German language courses in Munich

366 posts in this topic

Does anyone have any recommendations on a school that offers Deutsch für die Beruf? in an evening course.

 

I have been attending Klartext evening courses and I have to say that it is challenging to stay motivated based on the topics that the teacher and book focuses on. I have studied at Klartext in the past and I would highly recommend it, but unfortunately they do not offer a Deutsch für Beruf.

 

I read that TANDEM München offers this class, but it is quite expensive. Does anyone on TT have a personal experience (a) at TANDEM in general and (B) possibly with this class?

 

I have the experience of registering and paying at a school, only to find out it and their teachers are rubbish. Thus, any feedback is greatly appreciated.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to improve my German language skills. I am looking to take classes that will help me to not only speak fluent German, but also to fully understand the news, (whether reading a newspaper or watching television) and business conversations (particulary office talk). In the past, I took German language classes. The classes primarily focused on German grammar, (Nominativ, Akkusativ, Dativ und Genitiv). Although I finished in the top 5 of my classes, I did not have many opportunities to actually speak the language. I speak German with my German friends, but most of the times they are interested in speaking English since they have not spoken the language in many years. I watch German movies, news and even listen to the German radio programs. I understand some of the words, but not all of the words. When I look in a German Wörterbuch to translate words that I do not understand, I may or may not find the word. Sometimes, it gets a bit confusing and frustrating. Also, whenever I have an interview with a German firm, I would like to be able to fully understand what is being said to me so that I can appropriately answer the questions.

 

If you can provide me with some good recommendations, not sarcasm, please respond at your convenience.

 

Thanking you in advance for your assistance.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Self study by reading newspapers and online sources like sueddeutsche.de, spiegel.de, focus.de ... seems to be a good way to improve reading and writing skills in a foreign language (and achieve a better overall grasp of the language). You could start with short news items, look up unknown words, write them down in a vocabulary book and try to write summaries. I use the dict.cc Wörterbuch for English-German and German-English translation. The advantage of this tool is that it gives results even when you don't type in the basic form (i.e. nominative singular of a noun, infinitive of a verb etc.)

 

For language courses, I can generally recommend the Volkshochschule. The quality of courses obviously varies depending on the teacher and the mix of students, but it would be an affordable route to refreshing your knowledge. I took a class to prepare for an English certificate and it helped me quite a bit. They offer preliminary assessments via computer tests (Einstufungstests). Check out Programm » Deutsch, Migration und Integration » Deutsch als Fremdsprache/Deutsch als Zweitsprache » Service on the website.

 

For the costs, I would try and see if the Arbeitsagentur (assuming from your other thread about the job search that you are registered as unemployed) will pay for it. Make an appointment and then explain that you feel better German is crucial for the job hunt. On a side note, the Arbeitsagentur also offers Bewerbungstraining (short course which should include tips for job search, revision of CV, preparation for job interviews), this might be of use for you. Should the Arbeitsagentur decline to fund the Deutschkurs, you can get a reduction if you receive Arbeitslosengeld II and have a Münchencard.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rainydays is so right.

 

I have learned so many words from the newspaper - whether that's Bild or the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

 

The only thing is that, just like in English language newspapers, you sometimes only get to learn 'journalese', and not how people REALLY speak.

 

I mean, try explaining "Wir Sind Papst" to your English speaking friend... or a German one for that matter(!)

 

http://www.spiegel.de/img/0,1020,461486,00.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone here taken the Business German course at Inlingua? How much does it cost? it sounds like an interesting course and would perhaps better my chances at getting a job here afterwards. Their Intensive 20 Plus course seems interesting too as it combines 20 group lessons with 10 private lessons..anyone have experience with this as well?

 

I have some basic knowledge of German (level probably around A1-A2), as I took an intro course at uni and also did a few months of private tutoring before coming over.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks,

 

I'm looking to take some night courses. I took German 1 in the spring in the States but didn't get a lot of practice in, until about 3 weeks ago when I moved here.

 

Any experiences with schools, very positive or negative?

 

Danke schön,

TJ

 

Topics merged by admin

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took a course at the Goethe Institute when I first came here and wasn´t impressed with the teaching at all.

following that I went to the VHS, where I had a superb teacher who was also able to explain German grammar to us in English, which was a great help to me as grammar wasn´t taught in the school I went to!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"try explaining "Wir Sind Papst" to your English speaking friend... "

 

To be grammatically right it should read: Wir sind die Paepste! But since there is only one Papst at the time it is not right either since all the other Paepste died.

Another question I have for 'de Herglaufana' how can you learn German in Bayern? de redn hoid alle boarisch da,oda komisch nach der Schrift:-)

und when you can pronounce 'Brotloabidoag' or 'Oachkatzlschwoaf' you are a three quarter Bavarian. Then you have to learn the der, die, das and to which noun they belong. Good luck with it ;-) One easy rule: most verbs in German which have a 't' at the end, in English they have an 's'.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I´m currently studying at Tandem. They aren´t the cheapest, but they are friendly, the teaching is effective and it´s an easy spot to get to - number 27 tram drops outside, number 12 and 53 bus literally around the corner.

 

Oh yes, they also accept payment by credit card, which some other schools don´t, and they have a healthy social programme for students and their language partners.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Robinson:

 

I've been considering attending Goethe for some time. What didn't you like about Goethe besides the teacher? How long was the course you took? Thanks.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all!! Im currently in Munich teaching English (so I have some knowledge of a few schools) and I took a few German classes as well. I would have to recommend Inlingua's German program. Ok, they are the CHEAPEST.. but the classes are ALL in German so it really pushes you along and speeds up the learning process. Plus, the classes focus on SPEAKING.. the hardest part of every language. You do learn grammar, but without the intense grammar lists and such you usually get in a university atmosphere. Generally the classes aren't too big and speaking time is high. They offer lots of different classes as well. The have intense classes, immigration classes, night classes, business classes, and also conversation classes! If anyone has any other questions... feel free to ask me. I know a bit aout a few other schools as well. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've been considering attending Goethe for some time. What didn't you like about Goethe besides the teacher?

Please don't think I'm being sarcastic, but what else really matters when learning a language? How comfy the chairs are?

 

I took two courses with different teachers at the Goethe in Berlin. The first teacher was good, but the second stunk the place out, and I asked to be moved classes. The chairs were nice, though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the last two posts:

 

Inlingua's boast about delivering classes in German is nothing special. That's how it's always done. It's obvious. People wanting to learn German in Germany don't just speak one other native tongue that a teacher can use to explain German to them.

 

Aside from the teaching, your fellow students certainly matter to most people. It's obviously much nicer if you get on well and a positive vibe tends to make progress easier. They are also part of the teaching process effectively - particularly for the speaking parts of course but also to discuss questions and check things, share homework, and generally encourage each other. The friendships you build are often helpful to newcomers as well and you can learn a heck of a lot about your new home town and country.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No idea how German teachers feel, but inlingua has a crap reputation amongst English teachers. For all the glossy stuff about worldwide presence blah blah, read one-size-fits-nobody teaching method. Same old same old materials used for anyone from Berlin businessmen through to Bangkok taxi drivers.

 

Agree about classmates. But the teacher has a big part to play in this too. A lot of German teachers either like the sound of their own voice too much or don’t have the balls to shut up and let students speak.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone...

I'm getting a bit confused. I recently moved to Munich for study abroad, and I get here 3 weeks before the start of school with the intent of doing as many hours of language school as humanly possible to fill in the gaping holes of my german knowledge (I've taken 2 university-level semesters), but I am having a hard time finding any intensive courses other than the Goethe Institute. Worst comes to worst I'll go there, but the program I'm on has given me 500 € towards this language school endeavor, and I'd like to keep the price under that if possible, where Goethe runs about 1200€ for a 2-week intensive.

 

any suggestions?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@hodd

 

If nothing matters besides getting a good teacher, it's useless to discuss schools. Do you have the names of any teachers you would recommend in Munich?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@jctex

 

Good teachers' names? There's me, but I only teach English. I say teach, I gave it up a few years ago. I did have an excellent German teacher in Berlin, but I never found anyone even half as good in Munich. Some teachers advertise on here, and I’ve no doubt they are very good, but they’re fully booked/don’t have times to suit.

 

I taught overseas for a few years at the highly-overrated British Council. I would class myself as OK to average in the classroom, but some of my colleagues truly sucked the big one. Their students paid the same for lessons as mine. If jctex would like to tell us what benefits these other students got, I’m all ears.

 

The glossy brochures from inlingua, Berlitz and other McSprachschule franchises are laughable, and I’m being kind. Insist on a demo lesson, speak to the teacher and ask about the course materials before handing over hundreds of euro. No decent teacher would work for long at the likes of inlingua.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And because the above's as helpful as haemorrhoids, I have it on reasonably good authority that ASL Sprachschule in Leopoldstrasse has decent teachers. They also offer free demo lessons, use normal books (as opposed to scraps of paper) and seem flexible. I'm sure their chairs are comfy too, but until I study there I just don't know, sorry. They offer semi-intensive (mornings) and maybe more too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently studying at Goethe here in Munich and have found them very to be very good. They are expensive but I think you get what you pay for.

 

I started as a complete novice and am currently on my third intensive course and my German has improved vastly. After only living here for 3 months I am feeling more confident in my language skills and everyone I speak to is really impressed on how far I have come in such a short time.

 

We have been using the Schritte International books from Hueber and they have worked for me but some classes use others so it is worth coming in and having a chat with the staff. I'm sure any class depends on the other students, the teacher and most importantly how much work you put in yourself - but if you are parting with hard earned cash and really want to make a go of life here in Germany that should be incentive enough!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now