German language courses in Munich

366 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

Hoping to get some more up-to-date advice on this topic since a lot of information here is a few years old.

 

I'm planning to move to Munich later this year because my partner has found a new job there. Unfortunately I do not speak German so will have trouble finding a job myself. I have quite a good career in finance which I don't want to give up! I've seen a lot of jobs advertised which require both English and German, so my plan is to dedicate myself full-time to learning German until I'm up to a good enough standard. I'm not a complete beginner - with school and a recent course, I would be starting at level A2 on the European language framework.

 

I have two questions!

(1) Can anyone recommend a particular school or course, or offer any advice in general? I'm prepared to treat this as a full-time job, 35 hours per week.

(2) What is a reasonable time-frame to achieve this, in your experience? 2 years? 5 years??

 

Thanks for your help.

Deirdre

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11 minutes ago, DeirdreNiD said:

Hoping to get some more up-to-date advice on this topic since a lot of information here is a few years old.

 

Read the entire thread, most of the info is still relevant.

 

11 minutes ago, DeirdreNiD said:

I'm planning to move to Munich later this year because my partner has found a new job there.

 

If you are not married, make sure to look into the obligations of EU citizens moving to Germany (especially w.r.t. to health insurance).

 

11 minutes ago, DeirdreNiD said:

I'm prepared to treat this as a full-time job, 35 hours per week.

 

Intensive courses are usually about 20 hours/week, however, to make the most of the courses you should plan time after the lessons for homework, reviewing, etc.

 

11 minutes ago, DeirdreNiD said:

(2) What is a reasonable time-frame to achieve this, in your experience? 2 years? 5 years??

 

If you are dedicated and work consistently at it, it should take you less than a year to learn the basics. How long it'll take before you can work in your field will depend on what exactly you do.

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I would the do the integration course, if it's still possible to do that privately. it's more in demand than when I did it.  That's 4 hours a day (100 hours a month).   It's 6 months to B1 with two months for each level and so it'd be four months if you start at A2.   It costs about 250-300 Euros a months, which is by far the cheapest way to do it.   It's about the only way you can get language training for 2.5 Euro an hour - a bargain.

 

Actually it's similar to me, I'm a finance professional and I did it starting from A2, so I did 4 months.   It was massively enjoyable, I loved it :D.   You'd go in the morning, get taught and nurtured (which is something many adults, especially women, do not get much of) and make a heap of new friends, and then go home and do three bits of homework and learn the vocab lists.  And then start again the next day.   More than a decade on,  a lot of us still see each other around, and many of the teachers and staff are still around.  So the benefits are much bigger than educational.   

 

You can also do the B1 qualification at the end if you want (I did).   Then I carried on to B2 and C1 (evening) but I think there's more daily intensive courses for that now, too, because more people have that need.  I got a C1 pass a couple of years after starting.

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Thanks Swimmer - that makes me feel a bit more optimistic! I would be really pleased if I could get to C1 after just a couple of years.

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Does anyone have experience with Alinguas? I see that they're highly rated on various review websites, but no one on Toytown has mentioned them.

 

Additionally, does anyone know how Alinguas compares to Tandem? Thank you.

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One of the best schools and for the price I would say the best, is the DKFA. It's a collaboration with the LMU university and the teachers are fully qualified to teach German as a foreign language, many with pHds in the field. They offer full-time and part-time intensive courses. 

 

However to give a fair balance on pros and cons. DKFA is strong on learning German quick, focussing on grammar and passing the certificate to be able to study a university. If you are more focused on just learning to speak, maybe Berlitz or other could be better. Furthermore, regarded as the gold standard but expensive, is the Goethe Institute.  

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