Opinions on MMR vaccinations for children

1,235 posts in this topic

Yeah, flu shots are big in the U.S. for kids, but not here. I don't think I am going to go for it this year.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our blind faith in an establishment that has a vested interest in maximising profits astounds me.

 

If these industries were free of the profit motive then maybe, just maybe i could understand this nearly religious aspect in the mindset of many.

 

The medical establishment is far from all knowing and should be treated as such!

 

Does your local doctor have his/her practice there to serve the community purely on the basis of health or are we for the most part experiencing a quick 3-10 minute superficial exam of our issues only to be moved on to make room for the next patient/customer... there are always exceptions, but what is the reality here?

 

Is the producer of the product that we inject into our bodies concerned only for the health and well being of the general population or is there a profit motive perhaps slightly distorting these possible good intentions?

 

Where the need for maximising profit exists, it can not be assumed that your best interests are at heart.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to believe that the quality/reliability of drugs has improved a lot since we were children ... and we all survived ok (?).

 

A few months ago my son had his MMRV jab (I didn't even know there was a 'V'!). I did try researching on the Internet but there is a lot of rubbish out there and you can find some argument somewhere to back up every opinion possible.

At the end of the day I'm not a doctor, so I have little choice other than to trust the specialists in that field.

 

My son seems to have survived the experience ok so far. It was my call that the benefits far outweighed the risks and I wouldn't hesitate to make the same decision again.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because someone is making a profit, doesn't mean that they are ripping you off or giving you bad advice.

 

Immunization programs are probably the most successful medical invention/discovery in history. They have saved lives and prevented suffering on an immense scale. The people that don't get their kids immunized are either scared off by those in homeopathic type industries (who are also into it for the profit by the way) or are simply poorly informed.

 

Kids that are not immunized are not only at risk themselves, but put others kids are already immunized at risk because they give these viruses (which killed millions in their time) a chance to mutate.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A few months ago my son had his MMRV jab (I didn't even know there was a 'V'!).

the V is for the chickenpox vaccination. It isn't a standard one in the UK, I don't think, and might be because vaccination is supposed to increase the risk of shingles in adulthood, which is far more dangerous than a simple dose of chickenpox as a child.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is such a hot topic these days. I think people who don't vaccinate their children are doing a great disservice to the rest of the population. The autism explosion just begin about 5-10 years ago, haven't vaccines been around much longer? Why don't people look at other potential causes?

 

I do think that we are making ourselves sick generally, and that we have to be more careful about what we ingest and inject and whatever else, don't get me wrong, but I also tend to be suspicious of this particular anti-vaccine/autism movement, and I believe many of these cases will later be found to be attributable to something parents ingested decades before conceiving, and that many more will later be found not to have been autism at all.

 

Incidentally I heard a whisper that Obama's potential pick for the EPA is an anti-vaccinationist.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

because vaccination is supposed to increase the risk of shingles in adulthood, which is far more dangerous than a simple dose of chickenpox as a child

My wife had both chickenpox as a child and also shingles a few years ago (Guertelrose I think they called it).

Not very pleasant, but it hasn't left any serious/lasting damage except some scarring which is now fading.

 

Faced with these experiences/knowledge, my wife also didn't think twice about allowing my son to have MMRV. Ultimately I guess it was her call rather than my call ...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had shingles last year too, and had normal chicken pox as a kid. Shingles is very painful!! That was my first question regarding the pox vaccine... will my kid have more or less chance of shingles as an adult? Only time will tell...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shingles is the re-activation of the chicken pox virus - hence you can get it if you had chciken pox as a kid. Chicken pox in kids is not dangerous and as people have mentioned you just get a few spots and it goes away. Adult chicken pox is in comparison much riskier and can lead to more complications.

 

The supposed reason behind not using the vaccine in the UK is that its not a hundred percent effective. Which in turn means you are more likely to suffer chicken pox in later life (which as mentioned before is not very nice in adults).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no, Rich, i think you are wrong on the reasoning for not using the vaccine. Yes shingles is the reactivation of the chickenpox virus but it is more likely to occur when someone hasn't been repeatedly exposed thereby boosting their antibodies. It is feared that widespread vaccination will reduce re-exposure of adults and therefore shingles cases will increase rapidly, even amongst those who have been vaccinated. Shingels cases are lowest amongst adults who have been exposed (due to children etc) to chickenpox. Shingles can be very nasty (my grandfather had it repeatedly and was in a lot of pain) and can have complications.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@OG

 

You appear to be right - according to wikipedia anyway.

 

I know shingles isn't pleasant I had it just before some exams when I was a student and could have killed for a good nights sleep.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Immunization programs are probably the most successful medical invention/discovery in history. They have saved lives and prevented suffering on an immense scale. The people that don't get their kids immunized are either scared off by those in homeopathic type industries (who are also into it for the profit by the way) or are simply poorly informed.

Personally, I'd vote for the provision of clean water and sewage systems as the most successful medication invention of all time, but then I'm an engineer and hence biased ;-)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The outcome of clean water is to improve health dramatically across the population, so arguably it does :) Just pointing out that advances in health are not always due to the work of doctors.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, but of the ones that are to do with doctors (scientists), immunization is probably up the top of the list of successes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Right now I'm involved in promoting community education and awareness of symptoms of autism so children with this disorder can be identified and diagnosed as soon as possible so they can receive early intervention services at an early age.

Autism has been around. Look how many centuries it took to find causes for epilepsy. Think of all the false causes attributed to it. We are just better now at identifiying certain diseases/disorders, but that doesn't mean we can jump at everything as the cause. They have been there all the time.

 

They do have a vaccination for shingles in the US but it is only typically given to Senior Citizens.

There is also a vaccine here for a tick borne encephelitis that I would recommend for anyone who is outdoors in the woods alot. The disease causes long term damage that will come back to haunt you. It is very sad. (You have to be over 4 years old)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

humm, haven't seen this thread for awhile. Agree with Binaural regarding clean water and sanitation as a MAJOR shift in public health.

 

As to the chickenpox (varicella) vaccine, here is a perfect example of how little we know about the long term consequences of vaccines. First please recognise that chickenpox was considered a benign childhood disease. It was sold by the pharmaceutical companies based on ECONOMICS. There were more studies done on the economic impact from working parents staying home with their kids, then there was on the long term studies of this vaccine.

 

100 people a year died in the U.S. from chickenpox (usually due to a rare encephalitis that can occur). Now, we have no idea how long the immunity lasts from the vaccine, because the studies just were not long enough. Therefore, it is quite possible that people will need repeat vaccinations later in life to stay protected ($$$). Much harder to get healthy adults to the docs and pay for titers or boosters, especially as currently we have no clear guidelines as to when, if at all, that should happen.

 

Therefore, like some other vaccine preventable diseases that were also considered normal childhood diseases, but as a result of immunization were "pushed" to adulthood (mumps, rubella, etc), there is a concern that in a few years, if the immunity wears off in this first wave to be immunized, there is a risk that we could see cases of chickenpox in much older people. The disease is far more serious and scarring in older teens/adults. Could this result in far greater than 100 deaths a year? Time will tell.

 

Personally I would not get MMMV. That is 4 live vaccines at one time, and the side effect profile increases over the MMR as separated from the Varicella.

 

Eurovol: Aluminum ingested is completely different from injected. The former is eliminated in the gut 99%, the later bypasses this mechanism. The levels of aluminum given per weight in vaccines often far exceeds the levels deemed safe by the WHO and other agencies. These studies are based on adults as there are no children based studies. And no, I still do not hold blindfaith the CDC is not influenced, and I do not always agree with their agenda. The FDA is not in the service of the people IMO and is highly influenced by business interests.

 

Just another quick point...just because you are vaccinated does not mean you are necessarily immune. No vaccine is 100% effective and most immunity wanes over time. That is why is is so hard to eliminate most diseases.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had chicken pox for the first time at 21 years old. It was torturous, and developed into a very serious case of pneumonia (common in adult cases of chicken pox) that resulted in me being hospitalized. I was out of commission for nearly 6 weeks altogether.

 

Because of this experience, and that my son's doctor said the chicken pox vaccine will wear off over time, I decided against having my son get the immunization. He had chicken pox at 4 years old and barely noticed it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OP was asking about a

 

 

unique Toytown view on the risks or not ... I've not found an unbias {web-site}.. everyone has an agenda one way or another

.

 

So, similar to the web, there is no unique Toytown view ... there are also many web-sites defending MMR (or, rather, against/discrediting the scare-mongering)

e.g. CDC Web-Site

and others supporting separating them BreakSpear Web-Site

The web is awash, you'll not get a definitive answer.

 

I chose to have the MMRV for my son ... and haven't lost any sleep over it, neither has he.

And even if it doesn't protect 100%, it does protect 95% which are pretty good odds in my opinion, and the second shot is expected to cover the remaining 5% - so for me it was worth it.

 

I wonder if there is more money to be made from individual shots or from MMR ... anyone know?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now