Pregnancy, state help, and health insurance

25 posts in this topic

Hi all,

 

I hope someone can help me here, although my situation is complicated to say the least and quite a personal one, but I can't seem to find the right advice anywhere-kudos for any good advice.

So I have been studying a degree in the UK for 2 years, but had to leave due to suprise pregnancy and subsequently began full time work. My partner is a second year uni student, German national. Now of course, I want to bring up my child in a proper family, so decided the best thing to do was somehow pack up and move out there.

 

Since I have been studying full time for practically my whole life whilst working as much as possible, I haven't paid enough UK National Insurance contributions to qualify for contribution-based JSA, which effectively means that I can't even claim ALG for the temporary 3 month allowance. It seems, in fact, that I can't claim anything until the baby comes, at which point i can only claim elterngeld which I've been told is likely to be a poxy 300 euro per month. As a student, I am used to living on a shoestring, but this seems ridiculous for a mother and baby. Can anyone enlighten me on how anyone is supposed to pay Warmmiete AND support two humans on this? I've heard something about Hartz IV but I can't seem to get any clear info. Dear boyfriend is on the case, but people keep telling us different things here there and everywhere.

 

I will arrive in Germany about 3 months before the baby comes, I prepared myself for not being entitled to any help from the state and resign myself to having to live off the small savings I've managed to collect and decided I could manage, just, until the elterngeld appears. But now comes another concern...the worst yet. Health insurance-what do I do? I won't be employed, I won't be (registered) unemployed, where does this put me? I've been told that the figure is in the region of 146 euro (!!?*%$) per MONTH (!!??*%$) for AOK type insurance which there is no way I could afford in my wildest dreams right now, let alone when I 'pop'.

 

We've been delving into these issues for a while now and I am absolutely tearing my hair out about it. It seems like I can't get anything when I am too pregnant to work, a bare minimum as a new mother to a baby and on top of that I am expected to be afford extortionate healthcare costs. Now I would understand not being entitled to any money if, like some people, I just wanted to come over to bum around, have a great larf and claim off the state. But I don't. Please don't be too harsh on me, I dislike not being able to provide for myself as it is, I just want to raise my child with it's father and I think there should be some way of me possibly doing that until my partner finishes his degree, or until my child is old enough for me to pursue work. Sorry for the long post-is there anyone at all that can give me any advice on even one of the above issues? Thanks in advance for any help given.

Caz

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Not exactly an expert on it, but... once you get to Germany, take your partner and apply for ALG-II (Hartz IV). Asap.

 

Have someone from the job center, or a person involved in social law (ie a lawyer), help you in filing your application. Best have your partner call or visit the job center now to prepare such an application (asking exactly how you can become supported for example). Be ready to answer a whole lot of questions, and fill quite a number of forms. For example, it might become necessary to form a Bedarfsgemeinschaft for ALG-II with your partner (with him not receiving any due to being a student) in order to become applicable, by e.g. basing the reason for it around raising your child together. How old is the boyfriend? Above 25? Might play some role.

 

If your application is rejected - with proper reasons stated - absolutely apply for Sozialhilfe next.

 

Applying for ALG-II will automatically register you as unemployed btw, however i think you can dodge the then-mandatory work due to the pregnancy. ALG-II would also cover health insurance premiums and a number of additional costs related to your pregnancy.

 

Don't expect much money out of this though. Regular ALG-II payout is 345 Euro per month in addition to Warmmiete. This has to cover everything, you can't really get any extras for anything (you could on Sozialhilfe a couple years ago).

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I won't be employed, I won't be (registered) unemployed, where does this put me?

Theoretically, at least without adequate personal means of financial support, and adequate health insurance, even as an EU citizen you are not entitled to permanently live in Germany, so your battle to stay here may be harder than you think.

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Like YL6 says, if you cannot support yourself and if you'll only be a drain on the system, regardless of whether you are an EU citizen or not, you are not legally entitled to stay in Germany and you run a high risk of being deported.

 

Your boyfriend must have health insurance now if he is studying in Germany. As I see it, the easiest thing would be to get married, then you would be covered under his health insurance and you would be entitled to stay as well as receive further benefits from the state.

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Getting married to a German national solves lots of beaurocratic problems for many living over here. The one thing I would advise you to do would be to get married in England it is 100 time easier without all the German beaurocracy and then come here married! Fix und fertig as they say...all done and dusted!

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I agree with the getting married option. It solves a lot of problems, financial and otherwise.

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Think long and hard about where you want to have your baby. If the mother is British and the father is German it makes little difference to the child's nationality where s/he is born.

 

I don't know how good your German is but don't make the mistake of thinking all midwives speak perfect English, they don't.

 

Use the search function and look through all the previous threads here about Elterngeld, Kindergeld, Health Insurance and also about giving birth in German hospitals. Good Luck

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Just a thought, if your child is born in Germany, wouldn't it become a German citizen? Wouldn't you be entitled to some form of "Grundsicherung" or ALG at least until your child is 3 years old, without any worry of being deported for draining the social system? Wouldn't that just be logical and fair? maybe you should try and contact your embassy or any other relevant authority and ask them about it.

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Hi Carla -

 

I don't know about any support you might get here as I've never sign up for it. But I will say - having your baby in England is going to be alot easier on you financially under NHS.

 

I've lived in Germany now since October, and I'm married to a British man. I've learned quite a bit of German and I still couldnt manage to work in a German office based on my level of speaking the language. It takes a while to really get fluent. Do you speak German ? have you ever visited Germany ?

 

The folks on here who are suggesting the two of you get married are giving you sound advice. The Auslander will even tell you to do this because it makes it easier for them. If the guy isn't willing to marry you then there is no point moving yourself over to Germany. That probably isn't what you want to hear, but finding work here as a non german speaker - for any kind of job that going to clear a decent wage every month simply isn't going to materialize for you.

 

Obviously he speaks English ;-), have you guys considered settling in England ?

 

Health Insurance is mandatory here and it isn't cheap - you cant be on his insurance unless you're married.

 

Taxes are high - higher than England.

 

Rents are a little cheaper - on the plus side.

 

Jobs - Germany overall has a high unemployment rate and they give preferance to Germans.

 

According to some friends who just found out they are having a baby (unmarried, but planned pregnancy) were told that there is some law in germany that states since they are unmarried the father will not have any legal rights to the baby unless the mother signs some kind of legal document. They were told its best for them so all parties can share legal rights to get married. I personally think thats screwed up but Germany is a catholic country so it isn't surprising. I think this will effect what kind of support you receive from the govt. here.

 

Sorry to be a party pooper but those are the breaks. I think its really honorable that you're having your baby and everything, but have you discussed this with the father ? What does he want ? I guess thats the side of the story we may never get.

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Just a thought, if your child is born in Germany, wouldn't it become a German citizen?

Citizenship isn't granted through being born in Germany. With a German father the child can have a German passport wherever s/he is born.

 

Marriage would solve a lot of the problems to do with claiming financial support and providing health cover and would make living here as a family much simpler.

But if it doesn't work out long term, and you want to move back to UK with your child, you would need the father's permission to take the child out of Germany.

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Hi Carla -

 

I don't know about any support you might get here as I've never sign up for it. But I will say - having your baby in England is going to be alot easier on you financially under NHS.

 

...

 

According to some friends who just found out they are having a baby (unmarried, but planned pregnancy) were told that there is some law in germany that states since they are unmarried the father will not have any legal rights to the baby unless the mother signs some kind of legal document. They were told its best for them so all parties can share legal rights to get married. I personally think thats screwed up but Germany is a catholic country so it isn't surprising. I think this will effect what kind of support you receive from the govt. here.

...

Mostly true, but Germany is NOT a Catholic country!!! It's also true about the father not having legal rights if he is not married, but the reason is a bit ore complicated than stated here. What happens is that the Jugendamt (Child Office?) takes on an Amtspflegschaft automatcally... that's a kind of care mandate, in which it acts as the child's father. If she wants the mother can refuse this... I had an illegitimate child and I refused it.

I personally would much prefer to give birth in Germany than in England. That;s because even though it is much easier from the financial side of things I just don;t like English hopsitals and the lack of choice patients have in England. I have just been through (and am still going through) a lot of stuff on behalf of my husband but in comparison the German hospital he is in now is like a luxury hospital compared to the NHS one he was in over here.

 

I had my second child in Germany; she was a home birth and I simply chose my own midwife. But it's certainly true that you can't be certain that your midwife will speak English.

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Midwife care is excellent in germany. They come to your home several times after you've had your baby and help you with a lot of things. If you are breastfeeding they come even weeks after the birth if you request it and it is all covered by insurance. To get back into shape after the birth you can do a "Rückbildungskurs" which is most often also run by a midwife.

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Exactly. And in England the situation for new mothers is getting worse and worse. For instance: they are even going to close down the maternity department in Eastbourne General hospital; pregnant women are going to have to go to Hastings to give birth in future...

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... Germany is a catholic country ...

 

 

Religious communities in Germany

 

Christianity is the largest religion in Germany with 62.448211 M (76.15%) adherents, with the Protestant Evangelical Church in Germany (particularly in the north and east) comprising 32.8 % of the population and Roman Catholics (particularly in the south and west) 31.4 %. In total 76.16 % of the people belong to a Christian denomination, although a lot of them take no part in church life except at such events as weddings and funerals. 4.7 % of the population are Orthodox Christians.

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Even if ALL Germans are Catholic, it does not make Germany a Catholic country... its laws are secular.

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