High cholesterol level

89 posts in this topic

7 minutes ago, colincostello said:

A small number of eggs  per week is not going to do anyone any harm. It depresses me how so called expert opinion has been all over the place on this and other health issues.

It is truly mystifying. My overweight husband and underweight daughter both went to the same nutrition advisor at our Hausarzt. He was told to eat less pizza and chocolate….she was told to eat more of those! 
 

I think it’s helpful to stick to unprocessed/minimally processed foods as much as possible. Plenty of carbohydrates in vegetables and legumes without pasta or bread. Palm oil seems to be best avoided though contained in lots of processed foods.

 

Just find the right balance that feels right for you. Don’t forget that 20-30 minutes exercise, 3-4 times a week really helps. 
 

All the best.

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On 22/06/2022, 08:46:18, Tap said:

What about eggs?  I have been enjoying 2 poached eggs on wholemeal toast twice a week for the past couple of years.  I read an article this week saying that people with high cholesterol levels should avoid eggs.  I know this was the advice back in the 90s, then they changed their opinion and eggs, in moderation, were fine, but now I'm confused.  I want to keep eating eggs, if I can, because there's a chemical in eggs that helps prevent age related macular degeneration, something my Mother and my Grandfather suffered from and I'd like to avoid it, if I can.

 

My understanding is that generally cholesterol in the diet does not have a significant effect on cholesterol in the blood.  See the link for more info.

 

https://www.heartuk.org.uk/low-cholesterol-foods/can-i-eat-eggs

 

 

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I think it would be more helpful to understand how the body sees different foods.  What is a 'carrot' to your body?  When it breaks down a carrot how does it recognize the various components, vitamins and what does it do with them?  Some are needed, others not.  What makes that determination?  If, for example, you have high cholesterol, why would your body take in even more of the "fats" if it already has more than needed?  It apparently doesn't do that with vitamins.  Excessive vitamins are passed on to the waste stream.

 

We think the different vegetables or different meats or different dairy are different, but how does the body see them?  Are they just sorted into needed vs not needed by the gastrointestinal system?  If you only consumed the "needed", would you not poop?

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On 20/06/2022, 11:31:39, colincostello said:

I have even cut down on my choclate consumption. From one bar a day to about 3 a week.

 

 

Reducing from one bar a day to 3 a week is a really good start, but have you also thought of the content of the chocolate you are enjoying?

If you can also enjoy eating a high cocoa bar - 70%, for instance, then there is only room in the recipe for 30% of "naughty stuff" - sugar, milk, etc....

 

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On 6/24/2022, 5:03:25, sluzup said:

My understanding is that generally cholesterol in the diet does not have a significant effect on cholesterol in the blood.  See the link for more info.

 

https://www.heartuk.org.uk/low-cholesterol-foods/can-i-eat-eggs

 

The article is specific on eggs. Not on fat in the diet, in general.

Beyond cholesterol, sure there must be plenty of other reasons why fat consumption should remain modest...

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3 minutes ago, Gambatte said:

 

The article is specific on eggs. Not on fat in the diet, in general.

Beyond cholesterol, sure there must be plenty of other reasons why fat consumption should remain modest...

On 22/06/2022, 08:46:18, Tap said:

What about eggs?  I have been enjoying 2 poached eggs on wholemeal toast twice a week for the past couple of years.  I read an article this week saying that people with high cholesterol levels should avoid eggs.  I know this was the advice back in the 90s, then they changed their opinion and eggs, in moderation, were fine, but now I'm confused.  I want to keep eating eggs, if I can, because there's a chemical in eggs that helps prevent age related macular degeneration, something my Mother and my Grandfather suffered from and I'd like to avoid it, if I can.

 

Because the question was about eggs.

 

 

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On 22/06/2022, 08:46:18, Tap said:

What about eggs?  I have been enjoying 2 poached eggs on wholemeal toast twice a week for the past couple of years.  I read an article this week saying that people with high cholesterol levels should avoid eggs.  I know this was the advice back in the 90s, then they changed their opinion and eggs, in moderation, were fine, but now I'm confused.  I want to keep eating eggs, if I can, because there's a chemical in eggs that helps prevent age related macular degeneration, something my Mother and my Grandfather suffered from and I'd like to avoid it, if I can.

I find this fascinating - I'd never heard of a case where one food source alone is so strongly correlated to reduced degeneration. I suspect more studies are needed (even though there are very many already), but in the mean time it sounds like a very good idea for you to keep eating your poached eggs.

One obvious suggestion - but perhaps you do this already - leave your toast un-buttered and you will more than compensate for the additional saturated fats you consume in the egg yolks.

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On 26/06/2022, 07:49:59, robinson100 said:

If you can also enjoy eating a high cocoa bar - 70%, for instance, then there is only room in the recipe for 30% of "naughty stuff" - sugar, milk, etc...

 

Well sort of... After roasting, cocoa beans are ground and pressed which yields 50% solids and 50% fat (cocoa butter), sugar and milk are then mixed with the solids which is cooked to make chocolate powder (milk is excluded for dark chocolate) then cocoa butter is mixed back in at about 50-50 solids and fat to produce chocolate. This  is where the problem arises since with the addition of the milk and sugar the solids now considerably outweigh the cocoa butter derived from the beans, to overcome this lecithin  (a commercially manufactured substitute derived from plant seed oil) may be used to make up the difference. Typically the cheaper the chocolate the more lecithin is used but whatever it still contains 50% fat!

In the past soybean oil was the major constituent of lecithin but these days it could well be palm oil. (My sister back in the UK will not buy Cadberry chocolate because she says it contains palm oil though how wide its use in confectionery  is I don't know.

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