Choosing to write "Nuremberg" vs. "Nürnberg"

24 posts in this topic

 

Why do Brits, Americans, Canadians etc who live in Germany still say & write Nuremburg??

It depends. There are different reasons for that. Its the English equivalent of 'Nürnberg' in the first place. Also, its better for the search and display, as the umlaut symbol might create problems when some web links are opened somewhere else, in a different country. Also, the umlaut symbol aint available on other keyboards.

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I dont really know the origin of that thingy, but here's something that I found :

 

Nuremberg

Usage: German

Derived from the name of a city in Germany. It was first spelled Nurnberger and then Nuremberger.

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It's a conspiracy to give you something to act stupidly smug about, and then we laugh behind your back when you do.

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you could also ask why Brits, Americans Canadians etc who live in Germany still write Munich, Hannover, Bavaria, Hesse etc.

 

The answer would be BECAUSE THAT IS HOW YOU WRITE IT ENGLISH.

 

:rolleyes:

 

grrr TT keeps changing the spelling of Ha.nover to Hannover.

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Actually, in English Hannover takes only one 'n' - but if you write it like that in a TT title, it gets (mis)corrected automatically. <_<

 

Edit: And in a post as well...

Edit 2: As OG has just discovered.

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you could also ask why Brits, Americans Canadians etc who live in Germany still write Munich

Hmm, you know I never thought of that :unsure: But it still annoys me.

 

 

We could always rename it Norisstadt after the nymph. Not every city gets named after a wet tart.

Is that what the racetrack is named after ~ A wet tart!

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Actually the English versions of German city names are often closer to the original version than the todays German version.

 

English: Nuremberg

German: Nürnberg

Original: Nuorenberc

 

English: Munich

German: München

Original: Munichen

 

English: Cologne

German: Köln

Original: Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium or short just Colonia

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Choosing to write "Germany", why do English-speakers in Deutschland keep on doing it?

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Well, why do foreigners in Italy still call "Firenze", Florence? Or "Roma", Rome? Or "Napoli", Naples? 'Cause there's an accepted English alternate spelling of these names, and calling them by their real names marks you as kind of pretentious. A pseud, if you like.

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I'm guilty and I think the reason is that when I'm speaking English I'll use the english pronunciation of Munich, but the German pronunciation of Nürnberg. No Nurembergs for me, sounds awful.

 

C'est la vie.

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I thinks it's for the same reason that Germans write Mailand and the Brits Milan for the city of Milano;

or (same order) Florenz, Florence, Firenze or moving into France,

Diedenhofen and Thionville, (the Brits have never heard of it)

or into Belgium;

Lüttich (D), Liege (F)* and Luik for all Flemish speakers (the Brits have heard of it but only because they got lost there on the way to somewhere else) ...

The list is long, the reason irrelevant.

 

* had to write that as writing a capital B in brackets produced a smilie. Why is it that some people write smilies when they mean . ...

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I think we call cities by whatever name we first became familiar with them. I'd never heard of Regensburg or Ratisbon before I took this job over here, so Regensburg it is. Even my co-workers who can barely order a beer in German call it "Regensburg" - and sound pretty credible doing it. Wuerzburg, on the other hand... "wers-berg".

 

I've slipped into calling Nuernberg by its German name even when talking to other Americans, because I discuss going there with my German fiance and other Germans. Plus, "Nuremberg" before I came over here only had negative connotations for me (Nuremberg Laws, then Nuremberg Trials). I pass that parade ground and building every time we drive into the city, but still can't wrap my brain around the great city we visit for fun being so intimately connected with Germany's darkest past.

 

Munich, on the other hand, will always be Munich. I'll say Muenchen when I'm speaking German, but it will always be "Munich" in my head.

 

Unless I feel like calling it "Minga" to annoy the Prussian I'm marrying ;)

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I think Nuremberg is the latinised version of the name, which is why you'll hear the speakers of modern latin based languages like French, Spanish, Italian, Portugese & Rumanian refer to the city as Nurembergo or Nuremberga etc.

 

Nürnberg is the Frankische version of the name, at least, that 's what I was told. I've seen old German maps with the name printed as Nuremberg too.

 

As for why the Frankische call it Nürnberg it's 'cos there was originally only 1 hill in it, nur ein berg.

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Reminds me of the story of how Canada got its name.

 

The land was discovered by a German explorer who described it as "Keiner da".

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