Tips for passing a practical driving test

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Hi @radions

 

It is very useful post. I'm facing some problem with my driving exam. would be if we contribute a more on this post to improve. e.g Kreisverkehr = round about

 

umkehren = turn back, reverse

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On 1/29/2017, 11:19:37, sas05 said:

Hi @radions

 

It is very useful post. I'm facing some problem with my driving exam. would be if we contribute a more on this post to improve. e.g Kreisverkehr = round about

 

umkehren = turn back, reverse


 

 

 

Most of what you need to know are already explained earlier in this forum. The rules at roundabout are very simple:

1. Give priority to the vehicles which are inside the roundabout already, and you also have priority when inside

2. You dont signal when entering (since it has only one direction anyway), but you must signal when you are leaving.

3. Deduce your speed to traffic situation. It is not advisable not enter with lower gears 4,5,6 since you need to slow down anyway. I once entered with gear 3 because there was no traffic but my instructor shouted on me.

 

Good luck

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Hello all,

I have been following this topic for one year as i failed my test three times .Every time the tips in this forum is so important .Just one tip from me Go and give the test when your perfect .perfect is when you know each and every situation how to react.

         My experiences :

            1) Always do the shoulder blicks correctly and be confident.

            2) Also don't listen to the conversion done by your instructors and the prüfer concentrate on your driving.

            3) changing lanes at signals always think before when is says right or left to change lanes

             4) when you cannot do somethings like to turn left or right dont panic make sure you tell him i was not able to turn In my case i was confused 

              while entering the autobahn so i took the exit and told him i was not able to maintain enough speed so exited he said fine and made to take the next autobahn so he just want to test if you know driving well.

Thanks all the best

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Hi, I’ve benefited from this forum in the preparation for my test. Thanks to all who have contributed! Here are some of my tips for future test-takers.

One piece of information I couldn't find online was where the test would start & end. After having taken the test, I realise there are a few possibilities:

  1. If you’re having the test early in the morning, it’s possible to start from TÜV and end at either the driving school or TÜV
  2. If you’re having the test in the middle of the day, chances are you will start from the driving school and end there as well
  3. The other possibility is to start from the driving school and end at TÜV

I wanted to know the start and end points so that I could familiarise myself with the possible routes.

Steps I took:

  1. Use google maps to determine possible routes between the driving school and TÜV and pay close attention to the ones which require the use of an Autobahn
  2. Print out screenshots of the map; you need a certain level of granularity so do zoom in (I used a total of 15 A4 sized papers to print different parts of the map and pieced them together using scotch tape)
  3. Pay attention during your driving lessons and mark out on the map things you need to take note of: 2-lane roads (so that you can keep right & not cut into someone else’s lane), junctions where you need to give priority to the right, speed limits, entrance points, roads with more than 1 lane (so that you can plan ahead which lane to take for a smoother drive), roads/junctions where you have to ask ‘rechts oder links’
  4. You can also use the “browse street view” function on google maps to familiarise yourself with the roads
  5. Do take note of the quieter areas around the driving school and TÜV as well since that’s where you’ll be doing your parking and get tested on giving priority to the right etc.

Before the test day, I knew I would be starting from the driving school but I didn’t know where the test would end (my instructor didn’t know either). We were only told on the day itself by the examiner that the test would end at TÜV. That didn’t put me off guard as in my head, I knew how to get there and what to look out for.

Another thing I did before the test was to run the different traffic scenarios in my head. I.e. what to do when:

  1. You see a yield/ stop sign and you need to go straight/ turn right/ left
  2. You see a priority sign and you need to go straight/ turn right/ left
  3. There’s no traffic sign at the junction and you need to go straight/ turn right/ left
  4. You need to turn right/ left at a traffic junction
  5. There is a roundabout
  6. There is an ambulance nearby
  7. You’re entering/ exiting the Autobahn
  8. You’re changing lane
  9. You need to u-turn
  10. You need to enter a traffic-calming zone
  11. You need to do an emergency brake
  12. You need to parallel park/ park perpendicularly

The day before the test, my husband drove me around the driving school and onto the Autobahn so that I could refresh my memory.

I did prepare for the technical questions on the car but the examiner didn’t ask.

On the day itself, I took my time to set up the car seat and mirrors. The examiner was friendly and my instructor was very chatty. The two of them just chatted happily during the test. I think that helped calm nerves and I was not nervous at all, which was great. I understand basic German but the examiner was very kind and used English. I think this is examiner-dependent though. So do learn the German driving words and phrases.

For the test itself, I did the following:

  1. Give priority to right a few times
  2. Enter a traffic calming zone
  3. Parallel park
  4. Do an emergency brake
  5. Ask ‘rechts order links’ (cause there was a no-entry sign)
  6. Enter/ exit the Autobahn

I think what you need to do depends on the examiner. Some people do more, some less. But once the examiner gets a good sense of how safe/ well you drive, he will end the test. Always check your blindspots, change the gear gently and don't drive too far above/ below the speed limit.

This video gives a good sense of how a test feels like: Gerd Moll Onlinefahrlehrer

I used this website a lot too: Getting Around Germany

Yup, so rest well before the test, remember to bring your identification card and drive safely!

Good luck :)

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Want to contribute to this thread as it helped me a lot. Passed my exam in my first attempt and the examiner was very impressed from the beginning. At the end he was saying to the instructor how good I drove.

 

I did it from scratch, which means didn't have any driving experience before. Following are some of the tips for preparing.

* Important things like shoulder blicks should be automatic and a habit. You should be in a position where you won't not have to think of doing them, and should automatically execute them on reflex while changing lane and turning.

* Right of way situation- The right of way signs are pretty intuitive and straightforward, but sometimes it's execution can complicated, specially with 10 cars behind you and others waiting at other streets of the junction. You should be able to deduce your priority in a fraction of a second by reflex and act appropriately. I realized that I was sometimes too caught of deducing my priority, which made me ignore other things like pedestrian crossing, signals from other drivers and made me do fatal mistakes. In reality when you drive a lot, everyday, for years, this gets in your reflex, but not really possible in 20 - 30 driving sessions. That is why I followed the advice of ES and run the different traffic scenarios in my head. There could be several permutation/combination of scenarios, but after a while you will realize it reduces only to a few parameters. You will have to then run them in the head and internalize.

* Research on things if you have any doubt. You should have zero confusion in the road. For example I was really confused how to enter autobahn when the right lane is not empty - I should yield to them, and at the same time not slow down and stop! I watched some videos, read some article (my instructor was a cunt, he won't explain anything clearly and would just shout on me) and realized that I'm supposed to match their speed and observe the other car's 'body language', create a gap and enter. These things helped in the exam.

 

My exam went like this:

---

* Initial questions - The examiner asked me about the different lights (learn to use them before by yourself, ask your instructor if he doesn't show by himself). Then asked, where is the handbrake? Then 'controliern Sie die Handbremse' (test the hand brake)! Thanks to the links in this thread (the youtube link by ES), I did it like a boss - show that the car does not move in the first gear with the handbrake on (my instructor never ever prepared me for these questions). The examiner was impressed and asked me to not be nervous and we took off. 

* Autobahn - He made me go to an autobahn. While entering, I realized that the right lane was completely occupied - also there were two slow moving trucks in the lane, slowing down the entire lane. I matched the speed of the traffic and found myself next to the trucks, and realized that entering between the trucks is not a good idea. So I stopped accelerating and 'created a gap' behind the second truck and moved in front of a car. The examiner was very impressed and said 'sehr gut gemacht!' several times. The examiner and the instructor started discussing themselves how difficult and risky the situation becomes with trucks. We took the next exit, and was in the autobahn for hardly 2-3 mins. 

* Parking - I had to adjust my car by moving forward and backward 1 - 2 times after the back tyre touched the curb, but it was OK.

* Emergency brake - I did a strong brake and everything flew inside. They started laughing and said that it was a strong, hardcore brake and was good.

* City driving and uncontrolled intersections with right before left. They were pretty straightforward. 

 

Overall it was a good experience. I was happy as I was always making some mistakes in the normal fahrstunde. The internalization of the situations in the head, and doing research etc. helped me being confident and driving good during the exam.

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Hi all,

 

This is a great and helpful thread. I passed my written test an am now taking drivers lessons to learn to drive manual transmission. I always wanted to learn and I think it's practical to know how to drive manuel when living and traveling in Europe. Before this, I drove automatic for years with a good driving record. 

 

Getting the hang of driving manual is taking longer than I had hoped. I'm sure I will get it, but I really need more practice than these hour-long (and expensive) lessons. Hopefully I can find someone in Berlin that would let me practice on their car.

 

Anyway, thanks of the thread and I'll be coming back for more tips. Oh and Gerd Mall's video is also very helpful!

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11 hours ago, berlingoodman said:

Getting the hang of driving manual is taking longer than I had hoped. I'm sure I will get it, but I really need more practice than these hour-long (and expensive) lessons. Hopefully I can find someone in Berlin that would let me practice on their car.

I´d check whether there is a "Verkehrsübungsplatz" near you, rent a car (unless you can borrow from a friend), ask someone to drive it there and practise there safely. Will be cheaper.

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11 hours ago, jeba said:

I´d check whether there is a "Verkehrsübungsplatz" near you, rent a car (unless you can borrow from a friend), ask someone to drive it there and practise there safely. Will be cheaper.

Good idea! And in fact, I did find a fiend who will let me use his car.I'm in Friedrichshain. I'll take a look. Cheers.

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Couple things

1)

I had a little bad experiences with my first instructor and luckily when I failed my practical exam first time, I asked for a change of instructor from school, and they were considerate and assigned me an instructor who can speak English, and it worked out this time.

2) 

People who drove in other countries (especially India, taking example of India as I'm from there and drove over 200K Kms), you need to unlearn a lot before you drive in Germany.

 

I'm got my drivers licence this week. Specially many thanks to @radions and @ES. I used your tips to prepare for my exam. 

 

 

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thanks Guys for all your Posts. Passed my German Driving exam with little errors. I recommend watching  Gerd Moll Onlinefahrlehrer videos on youtube, together with knowing the basci driving rules, some practice with your driving school and some good night sleep

Cheers

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On 11/7/2017, 4:51:50, jeba said:

Hi all,

Hey all,

 

Further to this topic. After my last lesson, I started to get ambivalent about this whole process. My instructor couldn't give me an idea on how many more lessons I would need until I was ready to take the test. Now I'm starting to run out of money and, in fact, my motivation. :(

 

I'm thinking of postponing this for a while. My question is, are there are a certain amount of lesson hours I'm required to take before I can take the driving test? If so, do I have to re-do those hours after a certain amount of time has passed?

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There are the mandatory hours, including some in the Autobahn, some during the night, etc. You can Google that.

If your teacher thinks you are not ready he might be correct. The test is expensive, close to 300 EUR including everything and if you fail then you are required to take some extra hours before doing it again. I don't think anyone can tell you when you will be ready, not even your teacher can accurately predict it. When he sees it close he will tell you. Think what happens if you take the test and you fail, you will blame him and you will be down with 400 or 500 EUR.

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6 minutes ago, Krieg said:

There are the mandatory hours, including some in the Autobahn, some during the night, etc. You can Google that.

If your teacher thinks you are not ready he might be correct. The test is expensive, close to 300 EUR including everything and if you fail then you are required to take some extra hours before doing it again. I don't think anyone can tell you when you will be ready, not even your teacher can accurately predict it. When he sees it close he will tell you. Think what happens if you take the test and you fail, you will blame him and you will be down with 400 or 500 EUR.

My teacher definitely is correct. I'm not ready.

 

I gotta figure out if this is all worth it. But I've already come this far with applying, taking the written test etc...

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Do not give up. Having a license (even if you do not have your own car) open so many doors to new things.

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4 minutes ago, Krieg said:

Do not give up. Having a license (even if you do not have your own car) open so many doors to new things.

Thank you Krieg. I'm not a quitter. I'll manage it somehow!

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@berlingoodman Yes, giving up now would make no sense. I was in the same boat. Took a months pause, joined a new driving school and passed the test a few weeks later.

 

Good luck!

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1 minute ago, pmd said:

@berlingoodman Yes, giving up now would make no sense. I was in the same boat. Took a months pause, joined a new driving school and passed the test a few weeks later.

 

Good luck!

Thanks pmd. Maybe a new instructor is the key. But this one does it in English. That's important to me and a bit rare, even in Berlin. 

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Just now, berlingoodman said:

Thanks pmd. Maybe a new instructor is the key. But this one does it in English. That's important to me and a bit rare, even in Berlin. 

I think a new instructor is key. At this stage, you should know the mistakes you keep doing. With me, my instructor was extremely abrupt and had a short fuse. I just couldn't relax and began to dread lessons with him.

 

Changed school, younger more relaxed instructor and everything just clicked into place. You'll get it!

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