Do people at the "Ausländerbehörde" speak English?

113 posts in this topic

53 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

The ability to speak English is not a requirement to work at the ABH. 

 

 

Based on my professional experience, the ability to know the rules for health insurance is NOT a requirement to work there , either!

:lol::lol:

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AS others have noted- speaking English in a café,  shop is  not the same as official rules, visa applications at the Amt. It is too easy for misunderstanding, complications

when language breaks down on either side.    Try turning up at a UK/Canadian   office expecting them to speak your language. Translators are  the answer if your language is poor/non existent.  ( Now, you may find someone at the office who happens to speak some of your language, but   it may not be enough to explain to you).

 I have found the officials helpful here- some do speak some English but   all info is given in German. If they are not sure, they go and check with someone else, or phone to find out.

To Bob Morane, you do sound a tad arrogant and   entitled in your descriptions of Amt visits!^_^

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4 hours ago, Bridget in Berlin said:

I think the section you went on to quote is about the language which documents and business is intended to be conducted in at the ABH. Which, is a little different than English being part of the hiring criteria, as BadDoggie was indicating, (admittedly it would be very odd to make a language you are not allowed to use at work part of the hiring criteria but that does sort of sound like ABH logic tbh)

 

I have some friends in the various government (Bund) agencies that claim their lack of professional level English is a disadvantage for them career-wise. None of those people are client facing, and as far as I can tell, seems to be more about professional development opportunities.

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9 hours ago, Auswanderer said:

I have some friends in the various government (Bund) agencies that claim their lack of professional level English is a disadvantage for them career-wise. None of those people are client facing, and as far as I can tell, seems to be more about professional development opportunities.

 

This might be because of the EU. Lots of important decisions are taken on the EU level. You need English to communicate with your EU colleagues. Although with the departure of the UK France might try to change that 😂

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11 hours ago, Auswanderer said:

I have some friends in the various government (Bund) agencies that claim their lack of professional level English is a disadvantage for them career-wise. None of those people are client facing, and as far as I can tell, seems to be more about professional development opportunities.

 

On the other hand Bundesbehörden don't make language skills a priority when making hiring decisions (and it is easier to hire someone who already has the language skills than have employees acquire them.

 

1 hour ago, Namu said:

This might be because of the EU. Lots of important decisions are taken on the EU level. You need English to communicate with your EU colleagues. Although with the departure of the UK France might try to change that 😂

 

Don't forget that many EU institutions also discriminate against non EU citizens when making hiring decisions, which reduces the pool of candidates. 

 

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I think it comes down to a few aspects: Where you are and who you get and how their day has gone.

I took a German speaker with me when I went to the Ausländerbehörde in Potsdam. I was super early and the lady saw me earlier. She was really friendly and offered to speak English to me.

But I would always rather be prepared, because it really depends on the person who is helping you on the day.

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49 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Don't forget that many EU institutions also discriminate against non EU citizens when making hiring decisions, which reduces the pool of candidates. 

 

It is not discrimination, rather normal international relations, standard trade block.   Non-EU nationals moving for work are free to look for work in places they get priority (and free movement) because of their nation`s trade bloc membership, just the same.    Union institutions specifically also often have additional strategic and policy reasons to limit their work to their own nationals. 

 

I do assignments in other trade blocks and I currently contemplating a period of local employment in one.  But I know it is on the basis of special skills getting me a permit for something nobody else is available to do in that region.   This is not something we could possibly forget, I think?  We know before we move and it is a key factor in our decision-making.  (Also something that will change soon for UK nationals of course).   However, I do not see Belarus or Zambia etc as "discriminating" against me because citizens of Russia or Ethiopia or wherever get first pick on jobs, before me.    That is just normal international and political practice.    Most Unions do it.     

 

There are also usually routes to citizenship for non-Union members who hang around long enough and commit to their new location.  (Yes, I have checked that location I mentioned - five years).

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48 minutes ago, swimmer said:

 

It is not discrimination, rather normal international relations, normal in a trade block.   Non-EU nationals moving for work are free to look for work in places they get priority (and free movement) because of their nation`s trade bloc membership, just the same.    Union institutions specifically also often have additional strategic and policy reasons to limit their work to their own nationals. 

 

I do assignments in other trade blocks and I currently contemplating a period of local employment in one.  But I know it is on the basis of special skills getting me a permit for something nobody else is available to do in that region.   This is not something we could possibly forget, I think?  We know before we move and it is often a key factor in our decision-making.  

 

However, I do not see Belarus or Zambia etc as "discriminating" against me because citizens of Russia or Ethiopia or wherever get first pick on jobs, before me.    That is just normal international and political practice.    Most Unions do it.     

 

I'm not talking about requiring a work permit, I'm talking about requiring citizenship and discriminating against qualified foreigners who have valid work permits, but not citizenship.

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My memories of the Ausländerbehörde in Munich 20 years ago are of the most goppingly rude, unkind, unhelpful and obstructive staff I ever had the misfortune of coming across. If they had known English they were not likely to have gone to the effort of actually speaking it for you!

 

Times have changed. I hope.

 

 

 

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On 30.1.2019, 08:54:23, engelchen said:

 

On the other hand Bundesbehörden don't make language skills a priority when making hiring decisions (and it is easier to hire someone who already has the language skills than have employees acquire them.

 

 

Don't forget that many EU institutions also discriminate against non EU citizens when making hiring decisions, which reduces the pool of candidates. 

 

On 30.1.2019, 08:54:23, engelchen said:

 

 

 

That is correct. There are not many jobs for Non-Eu citizens in the EU.

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27 minutes ago, Namu said:

 

There are not many jobs for Non-Eu citizens in the EU.

As Brits are going to find out in the near future...

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On 30.1.2019, 10:02:29, optimista said:

My memories of the Ausländerbehörde in Munich 20 years ago are of the most goppingly rude, unkind, unhelpful and obstructive staff I ever had the misfortune of coming across. If they had known English they were not likely to have gone to the effort of actually speaking it for you!

 

Times have changed. I hope.

 

There are so very many ways that Germany is more difficult than it needs to be, but in my experience the Ausländeramt in Stuttgart has been a great exception.  The whole process for me was pretty straightforward, the Beamter mostly polite and professional, easy breezy.  Compare that to getting Permanent Resident status in Canada for my wife - holy cow what a difference.  The immigration process in Germany is orders of magnitude easier than it is in Canada.  Nobody at the Ausländeramt spoke English to me though...

 

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On 30.1.2019, 10:02:29, optimista said:

goppingly

 

off topic, but that is a word I have forgotten about for too long. Back it comes. Covers everything. Thank you.

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