What food do you miss as a Canadian or American?

524 posts in this topic

Sweet corn on the cob. The stuff here doesn't compare to the Midwestern stuff, both in taste and price.

 

Pies-- I have never been able to get a crust to come out right with local ingredients. If anyone has a good recipe using local ingredients, I'd love to try it. IKEA actually had a really great blueberry pie in their Schweden shop but they seem to have discontinued it- now when I go they seem to have some blueberry cake thing. In general I miss American-style desserts (I do make stuff like cheesecake here)-- I find that many of them in this part of the world are rather dry, although I do like Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte and those fruity cakes that are a white cake with fresh fruit and jam on tp- those are yummy! Never had a savoury/steak and cheese pie but it sounds really good, though!

 

Oh-- and can I add canned pumpkin to my list? I know there are fresh pumpkins here but I find that the canned stuff works better in terms of the consistency for baked goods like pumpkin bread. They have a pumpkin baby food so it's not like no one in this part of the world has thought of a prepared pumpkin product- so why no canned pumpkin? It seems like it would be useful for local recipes like Kurbissuppe. When they have canned pumpkin in the import shops, it's something like 4-5 euros/can, whereas in the U.S. I pay less than a dollar.

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I've not eaten midwestern corn, that I know of, but if it's anything like Kiwi corn, then I agree about the corn here-very expensive, small and not as much flavour

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Yeah, Good Eastern Sweet Corn on the Cob...ummmmmmm. You just can't find the stuff here. The corn here is so starchy, it's like eating soggy popcorn. Most of it's just feed-corn (animal feed) they are trying to pass off as the good stuff. You can eat quality sweet corn raw and it doesn't even seem starchy.

 

What else...

 

yes, canned pumpkin

bagels

good beef (i find the pork and chicken better here)

jiffy corn muffin mix and cornbread in general

sharp cheddar cheese (not the crap that looks and tastes like candle wax)

triscuits

brown suger (not sugar in the raw or just granulated brown sugar, but the moist stuff for baking)

an abundance of fresh veggies (yes, I know you can get just about anything at the Vikt markt but I mean at the local grocery store)

 

otherwise, most of the stuff can be found--even if it is outrageously expensive.

 

More importantly, what I miss is an oven that can accomodate (what for Americans are) normal sized pans or two pans at once! These damned Easy-bake ovens are just too frickin' small!

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I must have un-evolved or different bagel taste buds to all the yanks, cos I think the bagels here beat the pants off the ones I've had in the states

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errr, make that brown sugar...

I have found a pretty decent likeness to American brown sugar in Asian shops. It is made by Wang Kanai and it is called "Natural Brown Sugar". I have used it in my baked apples recipe and it works pretty well!

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I ask a French friend of mine to bring it when she can from northern France near Belgium. Looked in all sorts of Bio shops and just got blank stares...

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I got brown (soft) sugar in england, so I presume all english food stores can get it for you (tesco brown sugar)

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@perfumer,

Try that big Asian supermarket at Hohenzollnerplatz, they have a number of different brown sugar brands and some may make a good substitute.

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I have found a pretty decent likeness to American brown sugar in Asian shops. It is made by Wang Kanai and it is called "Natural Brown Sugar". I have used it in my baked apples recipe and it works pretty well!

 

@perfumer,

Try that big Asian supermarket at Hohenzollnerplatz, they have a number of different brown sugar brands and some may make a good substitute.

Thanks for the tip. When supplies run low, I'll check there.

cheers.

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oh damn...who said Dairy Queen, now I wont be able to sleep"ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh"

I had a DQ blizzard in Cambodia this fall, also had one last year in Peking. But cannot find one in Europe!

 

also had a Slurpee in Thailand too. had to take a picture of the machine too.

 

post-2166-1199639337.jpg

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There aren't any DQs in Europe, at least according to the international section on the DQ location search on the dairyqueen.com website.

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smoked meat sandwiches

poutine

dim sum

pumpkin pie

tourtierre

Roncesvalles Village standbys: Sue's phad thai, tofu samosas at Alternative Grounds, Bulgogi at Butler's Pantry

humpty dumpty BBQ chips

Smart Food (cheese popcorn)

hot & spicy Bloody Caesars

plump & juicy honey garlic chicken wings

A good Sunday morning brunch with a pile of newspapers

 

hmmm... I'm homesick!

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Can you explain to me the difference in the spiceyness between the Tex Mex you've found here and the 'original'? Is it simply that it's hotter or is the spice blend different, are there perhaps certain ingredients that are missing here? I'm interested if there's really something my pallet is lacking or if there's an element of the phychological influence in your perceptions.

As stated in my first post, the problem I find here is that the Tex-Mex tends to not only lack spice (heat) but is also sweet. Most basic tomato-based salsas don't include sugar. Obviously there are variations to every recipe. I don't care for the German variations of Tex-Mex that I've found so far. At this point, I'll just make it myself and not waste the money in a restaurant.

 

I understand that as a non-Texan, you would go to Anywhere, Texas and expect good Tex-Mex food, just as you'd expect to go to Anywhere, Germany and expect great beer. Unfortunatley, I've definitely come across a few stinkers in both places.

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Cheddar cheese

Quiznos Subs (or any kind of hot toasted sandwitches, like a pannini)

Bagels

Cheese spreads that aren't just flavored with Schnittlauch (although it is good, I want sun dried tomatoes etc, smoked salmon)

Good quality beef at reasonable prices

Beef Jerky

10ct wings at bars

Dollar Beers

Oregon Microbrews

Poutine

Fresh corn on the cob, 10 ears for a buck

Spitz sunflower seeds

Kettle chips

Frosties from Wendy's, with fries to dip!

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Dried cherries and blueberries-- these are the 2 dried fruits I've not found anywhere in this part of the world

On your next visit to Berlin, visit the KaDeWe's 6th floor. They have an excellent dried fruits counter, with plenty of the usual and more exotic fruits, like star fruit, watermelon (ew), dragonfruit (interesting, but once was enough), etc. A few Turkish nut stores also carry cherries and good ones at that, not too sweet or mushy, but I've only ever seen blueberries at KaDeWe.

 

I could use one of those big popcorn tins, the kind that you usually get from a deranged but fun relative for Christmas, filled with plain, cheese, and caramel popcorn. The tin would be very useful for storing pet food, but I've never seen one here; I presumed it was because popcorn just isn't a big love here.

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