Experiences learning the Bavarian dialect

61 posts in this topic

Thanks for offering your thoughts and experience regarding my questons. I think it's clear that a good start in Hochdeutsch is very important,...and I'm not going to think about it too much and hope that over the years I can learn to understand my group of Bavarians a bit more when they're talking with each other.

 

Sue87,...what you said really hit a personal cord with me:

 

"They're capable of understanding the "Tagesschau" or reading the newspaper, after all, right? I think they're just afraid of looking stupid when it turns out that they would have to concentrate real hard to speak proper German. Which is kind of unfair, they should really think about the poor people that have to learn a difficult language like German in the first place. The least they could do if they have a non-German in their family is go a little bit out of their way to communicate. "

 

How could they possibly look stupid infront of a person who is learning German as a second langauge and still hasn't quite got a grip of Dativ and Akkusativ yet? I could maybe understand that fear infront of other Germans,...but not a foreigner. For me the hardest thing I've found as a second langauge learner of Hochdeutsch socialising with Bavarians is that they show me that they can speak hochdeutsch, but when they're all together and chatting in 5th grear in Bavarian no one stops to translate what was so funny about that joke,...or to help me understand what theme the group is getting so annimated about. I try really hard not to get upset about this when it happens, but that's not easy to accomplish when you've been a spectator for the last 2 hours and you're lost and no-one's even noticed that you're lost. I do ask them what was so funny, or what we're talking about,...and that that point someone will translate for me in Hochdeutsch,...but unless I ask, I'm kind of left in dark. Sometimes they even seem to be frustrated with my questions and need for translation,...it kind of effects the flow of conversation. I guess this is why I asked how possible it is to learn Bavarian because my motive is to be involved and included.

 

Maybe I just need to keep asking 'What was so funny?' or 'what are we talking about now?' and maybe after a while my new group of friends will start to innitaite more translation and assistance.

 

Sarabyrd,...I think this very method has helped me learn the limited Bayersich that I do have. So yes,...I agree and will continue to do this:

 

"Do your shopping in the bakery and butcher's instead of a supermarket, speak to the people in Hochdeutsch, they will answer is dialect, possibly repeating what you had said. Twist your tongue to make similar sounds. Stick to it, that's how you learn."

 

Once again,...thanks

Mel

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I think Bavarian is unfortunately a dying language. My eldest grandson Max as a child spoke so thick Bavarian, picked up from his other Granny that even I who have been living here in Aubing for 36 years had problems understanding him. Now 16 years later he speaks only "Hoch Deutsch " as apparently it's not "in " at High school

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I'll give it a crack, but it's been years since i've even HEARD Bayrisch, so forgive me if its wrong, but...

I've had enough of them , the (reichdeitschn? maybe Prussian...) they come from everywhere, can't even get any peace at home.

Once again, a thousand apologies if thats wrong.

SebAus

you have nothing to apologize for you did fairly well. Most of the Reichsdeitschn(Prussians) wouldn't have had a clue...

Here is the closest translation in to english:

I'm so fed up with those (northern) germans I can't take it anymore! They are coming/going everywhere! Not even at home I get any peace (of mind)!

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Sorry, which real Bavarian? Only there were 19 different real Bavarian dialects last time I counted.

Zwo, zwe, zwa *shakes head at Landshuters

I doubt 19 is enough after we have allready two diffrent dialects in our town. The garmisch version and the Partenkirchen version.

We pronounce it: Zwoa

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Little surprise since the Bavarians were Reichsdeutsche themselves from day one of the German Empire ... one can hear the term "Reichsdeutsche" occasionally in Austria, which was not part of the then (1871) newly founded "Kleindeutschland" as opposed to the Großdeutschland envisioned by Austria before the "German War" of 1866

Well till about 20 years ago they were called Reichsdeitsche around here. (Sau)Preissn is more common our days. But worse then them are the Dunkeldeitschn (it has nothing to do with the skincolor of a person)

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I`ve been here on and off since 93 and speak ober-intall bavarian/ mild tyrolean . I have never had any teaching , and just submerged myself in the language here , my best 2 bavarian friends , Loddärr and Schnäckki decided after 2 weeks it would be better for me ( as a tradesman ) to learn the heimat dialect as opposed to high german , and they were absolutely right . learn bavarian and you can understand german , learn german you wont understand bavarian . Would you expect Geordies or Aberdonians to speak " Oxford " or the Queens english when socialising , I never speak this equivalent of "high English " . When I have an english conversation with 2 irish friends we all speak our own dialects , and understand each other ( I have lived in Ireland and use many Irish idioms ) and we never tone it down for Germans . Hope this helps !

 

@taxidriver - dunkldeutsch = DDRler oder ?

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When you're talking to someone in a way you know they won't understand, where's the point in talking to them?

The word communication is derived from the latin word communis, which means "common".

I'd feel uncomfortable putting someone else in that dreadful "smile and nod" position.

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I've been here for 6 years and I will never learn it. Why? Because almost everyone that I speak with (colleagues, friends) are not originally from Munich. My husband (ick, hate that term) is from the Franconia part of Bavaria so he speaks this Franconian German. Others are from Hamburg, Frankfurt, Regensburg (have you ever heard that dialect - totally not understandable). So, you don't just 'pick it up'. And why would you want to anyway? It's OK to understand it, but to speak it?

The Regensburg dialect is beautifully pure Bayrisch, it's when you get north of the city that you hit the real Obapfäyza. Wou!

@ taxidriver: dia Reichsdeitschn? dia? Please explain. d'Reichsdeitschn or de Reichsdeitschn, great, but dia?

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@ taxidriver: dia Reichsdeitschn? dia? Please explain. d'Reichsdeitschn or de Reichsdeitschn, great, but dia?

Regional pronounziation like: dia Oaschlächer (all those assholes) or dia Reichsdeitschn, a little mix in of the tyrolean pronounziation after they are just 10km away...

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Aw, hell, I can't be bothered to read three pages of posts at this late hour, so if this has already been said, I apologize.

 

I married into a Bavarian family, and my in-laws have been my best teachers. Unfortunately, they don't speak Hochdeutsch, though they can understand it. I seem to be learning Boarisch and Hochdeutsch side-by-side. I think the fact that you are highly social is a huge advantage. I've been here six years, and I probably understand about half of what whizzes past me, but I'm not social - I think you'll learn faster, because you probably talk more than I do (everybody talks more than I do).

 

You might ask your friends to slow down a bit, or ask your husband to update you from time to time on what everyone's talking about. Watch Austrian TV, listen to Austrian radio if you can - it's not Bavarian, but it's closer, and I find it much easier to understand. Keep studying the hochdeutsch (do Bavarian classes and study materials even exist? I doubt it), and let the Bavarian wash over you. It'll come. Good luck.

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the difference between a Preiß and a Saupreiß:

 

the last one try to stay here. the otherones go home after a while!

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SebAus

you have nothing to apologize for you did fairly well. Most of the Reichsdeitschn(Prussians) wouldn't have had a clue...

Here is the closest translation in to english:

I'm so fed up with those (northern) germans I can't take it anymore! They are coming/going everywhere! Not even at home I get any peace (of mind)!

Dank di recht sche.

 

I actually have been living in Australia since I was 5, so 21 years now, but still speak Bayrisch with my parents whenever I get the chance, though not for practice, just the way I learnt the language and was brought up on it. Surprised it has still stuck after all these years.

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My uncle immigrate to OZ in 53 and he still speaks Bayrisch like nothing has changed... and he never came back to bavaria for a visit either.

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Surely there must be a cure somewhere in the world?

Who would want to cure that? :D

 

It's a beautiful dialect IMHO.

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Very true, anybody wants to have a go on to translate this: De hoab i da scho' g'fressn, dia Reichsdeitschn! Ibaroi kemma's hi! Ned amoi dåhoam håt ma sei Ruah!

There are some slight grammar differences and some strictly Bavarian vocabulary and phrases, but this just goes to prove my point that it's MOSTLY about pronunciation.

 

Bairisch: De hoab i da scho' g'fressn, dia Reichsdeitschn! Ibaroi kemma's hi! Ned amoi dåhoam håt ma sei Ruah!

Hochdeutsch: Die habe ich da schon gefressen (ich bin satt), die Reichsdeutschen! Überall kommen sie hin! Nicht einmal daheim hat man seine Ruhe!

English: I'm fed up with them, the (former DDRers). They are coming/going everywhere. Even at home I don't (one doesn't) get any peace!

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while finishing my degree, I was working as a night clerk at a hotel and got to meet people from all over Germany.

 

While talking to a guy from Berlin, I kept thinking, "why does this guy keep on going on about Jews (Jude)?".

 

I eventually asked. In "Ist ja jud" jud is the dialect for good and not for Jews. :D

 

*Oops, I searched for dialect and missed the Bavarian part on this thread. I was in Bavaria at the time, though. :P

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I've also heard that one (in Bavaria); of course, coming from people from somewhere else. Sounds more like "jut" to me, though.

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