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Kinds of ketchup besides tomato

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I have noticed that ketchup labels very often say:

 

"Tomato Ketchup"

 

what else could it be? I've never heard of carrot ketchup or pineapple ketchup. I just don't get it. Maybe some ketchup expert can enlighten me.

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Two seconds on Google.

 

 

Ketchup started out as a general term for sauce, typically made of mushrooms or fish brine with herbs and spices. Mushroom ketchup is still available in some countries, such as the UK. Some popular early main ingredients include blueberry, anchovy, oyster, lobster, walnut, kidney bean, cucumber, cranberry, lemon, celery and grape.
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According to Oxford American Dictionary, the word ketchup probably originated in late 17th C. China, and the word, in Cantonese dialect, means tomato juice.

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I think that ketchup is so universally known as being made with tomatos (despite the quote Keydeck posted) that to specify that ketchup is "tomato" is odd.

I have shopped for groceries in 7 different countries at least and never seen any of the ketchups that the google search listed.

 

It's like saying, "lubricated condom", all condoms today have some form of lubrication on them. Specifying "extra lubrication" etc..makes sense but why specify the obvious?

 

As far as the blueberry or mushroom "ketchups" go, I would call those a paste or a sauce.

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Ketchup is a generic. Though if you're American its probably only available in tomaytoe.

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if your american its probably only available in tomaytoe.

exactly! ^_^

Only being from the South, it's tuh-may-da

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Looks good Gideon..If I was posting such a recipe or writing one down in my book at home, I would call that a paste though. OK, I'll stop now. I was just curious.

 

So when would you call a sauce a gravy or vice versa? The net might give one definition but I think it varies regionally. For me, gravy goes on meat or bisquits (southern style bisquits that is) but bernaise is a sauce and not a gravy even though it goes on meat (but definately NOT on bisquits).

 

I make a cheese sauce and a cheese gravy depending on what it's to be served with and how I make it.

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I am also not a big banana fan. I can eat them as long as they are not too ripe and hate banana flavoured foods but the ketchup was good.

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I think that ketchup is so universally known as being made with tomatos

I see. Because YOU say it's "universally known" it must be so.

 

> (despite the quote Keydeck posted)

Ignore what others have collaboratively written to the contrary. Check. Saint knows best.

 

> I have shopped for groceries in 7 different countries at least and never seen any of the ketchups...

Gotcha. Because you've never seen any, other ketchup/catsup/kachap can't possibly exist. After all, you've shopped at least once in almost 4% of the world's countries.

 

> It's like saying, "lubricated condom", all condoms today have some form of lubrication on them.

Do be a dear and let Durex know what they're doing wrong because clearly, they don't understand life in Saint's World. Also, please explain to the whores and college girls that here in a world which lives up to your beliefs, they're expected to get a full mouth of lube along with the lollipop.

 

> As far as the blueberry or mushroom "ketchups" go, I would call those a paste or a sauce.

Ah, OK. Because YOU would call them that, we must also do so. Right. I'll make a note. Could you please start a Saint's World thread to keep us up to date with all of our other misconceptions and the corrections therefor?

 

woof.

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So when would you call a sauce a gravy or vice versa?

If I rememeber correctly, and I'm quiet willing to be corrected by those who know better or can use google, a gravy is a specific sauce with the juices from a meat as the liquid. A sauce is any other liquid, and a ketchup is specificly with vinegar.

 

But that could all be rubbish.

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Gotcha. Because you've never seen any, other ketchup/catsup/kachap can't possibly exist.

I never said or implied that. I said I haven't seen it, that's all.

 

 

Saint knows best.

You're finally catching on.

 

 

Could you please start a Saint's World thread to keep us up to date with all of our other misconceptions and the corrections therefor?

You mean something similar to your "woe is me, no one I work with knows shit. I'm the only one with a brain around here", blog?

 

Gotcha ;)

 

Now I'm catching on too. It's taken me a while but I'm getting there. For fuck's sake BD, can't we have a conversation and state our observations without you getting personal?!

But thanks for the heads up about the condoms.

 

meow.

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If I rememeber correctly, and I'm quiet willing to be corrected by those who know better or can use google, a gravy is a specific sauce with the juices from a meat as the liquid. A sauce is any other liquid, and a ketchup is specificly with vinegar.

I used to think that, too, but then I met a bunch of Italians who called tomato sauce gravy, and rolled their eyes whenever anyone did otherwise. Maybe it all just got lost in translation.

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exactly, and the cheese gravy that my grandmother used to make wouldn't qualify as it has no drippings from meat.

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