What are you cooking today?

4,521 posts in this topic

On 4/4/2021, 8:35:29, john g. said:

It’s expensive. Pork is cheaper.

And if I mention mint sauce to Germans, they grimace and think I’m talking about spearmint/ chewing gum etc!😂

 

 

Germans on the culinary scale eat like baby food. They can't imagine that there are other flavors other than Petersilie. 

 

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On 4/8/2021, 6:31:02, clickety6 said:

 

Made pizza in a normal oven with grill and pizza stone method. Used cold fermented dough that I fermented in the fridge for 4 days! Tastes great. Here's one I made earlier. Not very good at the shaping yet  - it was supposed to be circular.

 

 

 

That pizza looks great! There is a guy on Youtube, Adam Ragusa, (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=adam+ragusea+pizza) who experiments with all things pizza using just his home oven.  Maybe fun to compare notes. 

 

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My stepson and his wife are real foodies and, wait, they're German.

 

ETA - Himself has also gotten pretty creative in the kitchen since his retirement. Always trying new things.

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I know lots of great german cooks.  And you can get great local produce here especially at weekly markets.  OK, there are lots of rubbish places to eat out at, but also good ones. 

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Guys, relax I'm only kidding! There is plenty of good German food. 

 

btw, has anyone else experienced the difficulty in finding Koriander? It is sold but they stock so little of it in stores that they often run out of it before I get my hands on it, while petersilie is always in abundance. Clearly it is popular, but I don't see the stores reacting to the demand, and I can't believe it is that rare or hard to source.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, wien4ever said:

btw, has anyone else experienced the difficulty in finding Koriander? It is sold but they stock so little of it in stores that they often run out of it before I get my hands on it, while petersilie is always in abundance. Clearly it is popular, but I don't see the stores reacting to the demand, and I can't believe it is that rare or hard to source.

 

This is the type of question where your location within Germany actually makes a huge difference. I live in Berlin where a large part of the population are of Turkish descent. There are many Turkish grocery stores and they all carry fresh coriander in large bunches. Metro is also usually well stocked. 

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re cilantro (Korianderblätter)--to be found in the following places:

 

  • better mainstream/German grocery stores: sometimes (though not reliably) with the other potted herbs like basil and parsley.  The leaves are usually small and mild.
  • Asian grocery: always available, usually €200* for a handful of stalks, fine, delicate leaves, usually with the roots still on, and packed in plastic.  God knows why. Decent quality but expensive.  (*Not actually €200.)
  • Turkish or Arab grocery: almost always available, usually around €1-2 for a metric tonne of big gorgeous strong-tasting lovely beautiful soapy coriander, fresh green stems. 

 

I agree with engelchen that it will depend on where you are at in Germany, but from what I have seen the order always goes standard grocery store < Asian grocery < Arab grocery < Turkish grocery.  Luckily for me, as a huge cilantro addict, it is always to be found, in abundance, in my neighborhood. 

 

We have some Indian shops around here but the only one that carried fresh produce closed years ago.  The only thing I get from the Indian store nowadays is PG Tips.  Even curry paste is usually cheaper at the Asian grocery IME.  Turkish grocery carries every spice you could imagine too.

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I usually can find pathetically small packs of coriander leaves in REWE, in the cool cabinet with the various bags of salads. Horribly overpriced and it goes mushy if you don't eat it soon. Must try growing the stuff, I love it!

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22 hours ago, wien4ever said:

btw, has anyone else experienced the difficulty in finding Koriander? It is sold but they stock so little of it in stores that they often run out of it before I get my hands on it, while petersilie is always in abundance. Clearly it is popular, but I don't see the stores reacting to the demand, and I can't believe it is that rare or hard to source.

 

A local Turkish shop here stocks it and the Asian markets sometimes have some bunches - often with the roots although i've never tried to grow it on.   I tend to buy a few bunches when I see it, blanche and  then mince them and freeze it in a freezer bag as a  flat sheet so I can break off chunks as I need them for curries, etc. Not so good for garnishing though.  Adding some oil and freezing in ice cube trays also works. I've only once seen it growing in the fields here. Whenever I've tried to grow it, I only get tiny wispy leaves.

 

Strangely enough, nearly every time I buy it in the store, the guy makes sure I ow it's coriander and not parsley. I must admit to having to rub a leaf between my fingers and sniffing it sometimes as it's not always easy to tell.

 

 

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On 11/04/2021, 00:45:07, wien4ever said:

 

 

btw, has anyone else experienced the difficulty in finding Koriander?

 

 

I purchase mine at Aldi.

 

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12 hours ago, Feierabend said:

I usually can find pathetically small packs of coriander leaves in REWE, in the cool cabinet with the various bags of salads. Horribly overpriced and it goes mushy if you don't eat it soon. Must try growing the stuff, I love it!

 

Put it in a mug or glass with water in the fridge. You can easily get a month out of coriander this way. It goes to mush if you leave it in the package because water kills coriander leaves. The stems and branches still have use, though.

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4 hours ago, klingklang77 said:

 

Put it in a mug or glass with water in the fridge. You can easily get a month out of coriander this way. It goes to mush if you leave it in the package because water kills coriander leaves. The stems and branches still have use, though.

 

In the fridge in a container with water is great, the only thing I find is that the leaves tend to wilt faster than with my other method, but both are good.

 

I usually wash the coriander, then set the bundle in a glass of water for a couple hours to plump up the leaves.  After the tops are mostly dried again I shake most of the water out of the stems, then take airtight plastic container, line it with half a sheet of paper towel on the bottom, coriander in, another half sheet of paper towel on top and jam it in the fridge, definitely lasts at least a month!

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9 hours ago, robinson100 said:

 

I purchase mine at Aldi.

 

I purchase coriander, parsley and mint leaves from the local Turkish or Moroccan market. The bunch is much bigger and better quality than REWE. I cook a lot with parsley and coriander so the measly amounts sold in REWE and Aldi are not sufficient. 

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