What are you cooking today?

4,504 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, emkay said:

I’ll have a look for runny jam!

 

Here‘s the recipe...https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/viennese-whirls

 

The cream filling is a bit too much...half the amount would be enough. 

Yummy! I mix a bit of cornflour with water or apple juice and stir into jam. Heat and stir, then cool and use. That thickens it nicely.

Love the BBC good food site. Now have an easy German apple cake from the site-Rick Stein recipe.

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On 14/12/2020, 17:50:35, CincyInDE said:

 

Some people have a magnesium deficiency and like to eat dirt.  :-P

 

 

Known as PICA, it can also be a symptom of iron deficiency.  (I am slowly becoming an expert as daughter was found to be severely anaemic last year. No longer anaemic but still severely iron deficient.)  My daughter didn't eat dirt but loved ice.

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16 hours ago, sluzup said:

Known as PICA, it can also be a symptom of iron deficiency.  (I am slowly becoming an expert as daughter was found to be severely anaemic last year. No longer anaemic but still severely iron deficient.)  My daughter didn't eat dirt but loved ice.

I had this whilst pregnant and really wanted to start eating chalk and other powdery things. 😳😅

Went away as soon as I gave birth 

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I always add razor thin slices of jalapenos to my Italian recipes, albeit, just enough to give it a kick.  My Italiano comrades always ask.. "are you from calabria"?  and I say "I'm from Techsus, cabron!,  don't you remember"?

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I did a normal Sunday lunch thing.

In traditional style I managed to cook enough to last around 4 days...

 

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7 hours ago, cb6dba said:

I did a normal Sunday lunch thing.

In traditional style I managed to cook enough to last around 4 days...

 

 

That's always what happens for us. I had a beautiful short rib in the freezer, but with Christmas cooking coming up, we opted for sushi delivery and no leftovers clogging the fridge.

 

Christmas menu:

 

Christmas Eve - Lemon Salmon Florentine over pasta

First Christmas Day - Roast goose in a Port wine reduction sauce with rote kraut and Kloß (yes, I can walk you through making the sauce if you are interested)

Second Christmas Day - Goose Dum Biryani (because she wanted goose for Christmas and I am not living with leftovers forever)

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2 hours ago, AlexTr said:

Christmas menu:

 

Christmas Eve - Lemon Salmon Florentine over pasta

First Christmas Day - Roast goose in a Port wine reduction sauce with rote kraut and Kloß (yes, I can walk you through making the sauce if you are interested)

Second Christmas Day - Goose Dum Biryani (because she wanted goose for Christmas and I am not living with leftovers forever)

 

 

Christmas Eve: Luxurious Brotzeit; Cold cooked beef tongue with hot mustard, gravlax with dill-mustard-sauce (all self-made from scratch), Weißwurst with sweet mustard and Debreziner, white bread (Turkish Blumenbrot) and Brezeln. Beer. No self-made terrine this time. More than enough to eat for two...

First Christmas Day: Chinese hot pot in a divided deep pan for fish etc. and meat. No double-dipping, stuff gets cooked, taken out with small special sieves and be served.  Noodles (Korean or Chinese glass~, Japanese buck-wheat, udon, fetuchine - not all of them ;)), rice, veggies, stuff for dips. Feuerzangenbowle. We'll have one dear friend over. No worries, we meet quite often and are careful.

Second Christmas Day: Beef tongue in Madeira-Sauce with mashed potatoes. Or duck. Or leftovers. Most probably the latter... Curry from that maybe... ^_^

 

All ingredients but the bread are already here, but I can bake my own if need be. Plus we still need wine for the punch and enough fresh milk to last until next week.

 

 

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Just want to share Himself's current go to sauce. It's nice and make extra. Just as good later.

 

General Sauce Recipe

 

Saute some onion in butter and then sprinkle with powdered sugar.

 

Splash in some vinegar of your choice.

 

Add some red wine and some port (or sherry or whatever).

 

Reduce.

 

Add a little broth or fond or fertig Sosse.

 

Thicken with corn starch. (Mondamin)

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It took me a while looking for the currants in your recipe, @fraufruit, but no success. I'll have to search elsewhere. :D :D :D 

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2 hours ago, emkay said:

Really getting into vegan cooking since my daughter changed her diet.  Enjoying cooking with her over Christmas.  Made this yesterday...very easy and tasted great!

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/spiced-aubergine-bake

 

 

 

 

If you want to add some umami to vegan dishes, try using roasted sesame oil in place of the fat component. It really adds flavor depth. I buy it on Amazon.

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17 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

 

If you want to add some umami to vegan dishes, try using roasted sesame oil in place of the fat component. It really adds flavor depth. I buy it on Amazon.

Thank you for the tip.  

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On 22.11.2020, 09:52:45, HEM said:

Yesterday I baked a Christmas cake.  Have not done this since moving from UK in the very early 1980s so searched for a recipe & found this:

Make & mature Christmas cake

 

Last Saturday the marzipan was applied & today the icing.

Unfortunately no mini-Santa to put on top so it got a pink unicorn (daughter insisted)...  Shudder...

 

mini-IMG_2215.jpg

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That's a very original festive touch @HEM, My youngest son has just insisted that the Easter Bunny figure (in fact, two of them) must be added to our cake or he'll feel left out.

 

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Hold onto your derrieres.  I have a long post, and I would like some assistance please.

 

I'm making a Thanksgiving-style turkey dinner for the currently permitted 2householdsInPrivateLessThan5People thing. 

 

All throughout my life there have always been others around who have been more keen than me to do the work to make turkey.  Those days are apparently over, for better or for worse, and none of those fuckers taught me how to make a turkey.  So here we are.  Not to mention, a turkey carcass makes WAAAYYYYY better soup than chicken.  Just sayin'.

 

I'm going to paste my cooking journal below, and I would really, really, really appreciate any pointers, tips, warnings, or "HOLY SHIT, YOU'RE NOT GOING TO DO THAT" kind of constructive criticism.  Really. 
 


 

Quote

 

ordered a 4kg turkey, got a 4.7 kg turkey == 10.3 lbs.
  -- no giblets but there is a neck (I'll simmer the neck all f-ing day for the gravy)

 

Dry Brine:
guideline: 1 tbsp salt / 4 lbs turkey
coat the whole outside as best as possible (oh yeah, feel it), and put in the fridge uncovered for 24 hours.  I will only be able to brine about 20 hours.

I ended up using:
2.5 tbsp salt + almost 1 additional tsp because it's super-super flaky not-very-dense salt
dry brine overnight (8:45PM into the fridge)

 

*** I am here in the process.  FYI.  

 

NEXT DAY'S PLAN

make foil hat to cover the breast meat
smear butter over the whole thing
stuff a few lemons, onions, parsley, thyme in the cavity

tie legs; tuck wings

bake raised up off the surface of the pan, breast up
celery, carrots, onion, white wine in the pan [might lose some browning in the drippings?]
fresh black pepper over the top
lowest rack level
450°F/230°C oven for 30 min.
remove turkey from oven; apply foil hat plus more foil over the leg-ends and return to 350°F/175°C oven for 12 min/lb. ==
10.3 lbs * 12 ~= 2 hours
so from fridge to carving it'll theoretically (haha) be:
initial 30 min. @450°F + 2 hr. @ 350°F + 30 min. rest == about 3 hours from fridge to table.

The actual end of cooking TBT by a meat thermometer.  I plan to go to 150°F/66°C.

 

 

THANK YOU, you filthy animals. 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, CincyInDE said:

THANK YOU, you filthy animals. 

 

 

and keep the change..

 

 

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5 minutes ago, CincyInDE said:

 

I'm making a Thanksgiving-style turkey dinner for the currently permitted 2householdsInPrivateLessThan10People thing.

 

5 plus children under 14 years old.

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Just now, Sannerl said:

 

 

Thanks, but you're focusing on the wrong part.  This is the cooking thread.  :) 

 

Regardless, we are going to be less than 5 total and no kids. 

 

 

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Quote

I'm going to paste my cooking journal below, and I would really, really, really appreciate any pointers, tips, warnings, or "HOLY SHIT, YOU'RE NOT GOING TO DO THAT" kind of constructive criticism.  Really. 
 

 

First of all, I just double checked my calendar. Are you planning turkey for the 23rd of December? Otherwise your timeline has totally confused me.

 

I usually also stuff butter very carefully under the skin. On the other hand I don't think I've dry brined before. 

 

Is there any step that you are particularly concerned about? Mixing different recipes/ methods is probably not a good idea.

 

BTW, you do need to be careful that your pan drippings don't become too salty to use for gravy (happened to a friend of mine with goose). 

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