What are you cooking today?

4,347 posts in this topic

38 minutes ago, slammer said:

I had to do the google, seems that kosher salt is "flakier" if that can be applied to salt and there is no iodine added to it. However it may not be the best choice in south Germany, as well as parts of Austria and CH where people tend to suffer from iodine deficiency.

 

The amount of iodine salt you'd have to consume to prevent iodine deficiency would kill you pretty fast, and since all kinds of sea-fish, seafood and algae are available even in those backwater parts nowadays (fresh, frozen, dried or canned), that's not a problem anymore. Plus there's medication.

 

Kosher salt seems to be good old German fine "Steinsalz" without additives. I prefer sea-salt of the same structure. Better for making kimchi.

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1 minute ago, Sannerl said:

The amount of iodine salt you'd have to consume to prevent iodine deficiency would kill you pretty fast,

 

Yes, if that was your only source of iodine which you clearly explained that it is not.

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1 minute ago, fraufruit said:

 

Yes, if that was your only source of iodine which you clearly explained that it is not.

 

I was referring to slammer's post.

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2 minutes ago, Sannerl said:

 

I was referring to slammer's post.

slammer sanner sheesh

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10 hours ago, Sannerl said:

 

The amount of iodine salt you'd have to consume to prevent iodine deficiency would kill you pretty fast, and since all kinds of sea-fish, seafood and algae are available even in those backwater parts nowadays (fresh, frozen, dried or canned), that's not a problem anymore. Plus there's medication.

 

Kosher salt seems to be good old German fine "Steinsalz" without additives. I prefer sea-salt of the same structure. Better for making kimchi.

Seems people get only two thirds of the recommended amount of iodine in the mentioned areas, and some people don´t like fish.

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17 hours ago, Sannerl said:

 

The amount of iodine salt you'd have to consume to prevent iodine deficiency would kill you pretty fast, and since all kinds of sea-fish, seafood and algae are available even in those backwater parts nowadays (fresh, frozen, dried or canned), that's not a problem anymore. Plus there's medication.

 

Kosher salt seems to be good old German fine "Steinsalz" without additives. I prefer sea-salt of the same structure. Better for making kimchi.

This is not correct.  Iodized salt contains between 15 and 25 mg/kg Iodine.  If you take the average, 20 mg/kg, then to get the EU RDI of 120 micrograms, you need only 7.5g salt per day.  Most people consume around 9g of salt per day, recommended is max 6g.  As food manufacturers have been encouraged to use iodized salt in their foodstuffs, it is not just the use of iodized salt at home that contributes to iodine intake.  Of course, the reason that salt is chosen for fortification is that it is a foodstuff that people are not likely to consume in excess and therefore the risk of getting too much iodine is reduced.  It is also mandatory for its use to be labelled so that, e.g., those with an overactive thyroid, can avoid it.

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The ubiquitous Coq au Vin - by popular demand (of one).

Done it many times but not recently.  First disect your Coq (this one was from Lidl) start to fry it, throw in peeled & quartered onions, shallots, sliced carrots & a few crushed cloves of garlic.  Drown under Aldi Melot & cook.  Later add spring onions.

Thicken sauce shortly before serving.

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Crispy Oven Wings


2 tbsp aluminum-free baking powder
1 tbsp salt
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp black pepper

 

^^^^ mix this up and toss the raw wings in the powder
Bake at 220°C on baking paper for about 50 minutes
when the wings are done, pull them out of the oven,
and let them rest 5-10 minutes;
this will help them release from the paper

 

Sauce
1 tbsp flour
1/2 cup butter
(make a roux then add the rest, and bring to simmer)
1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (to taste)
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
2/3 cup Honest Ron's hot sauce (original recipe called for Frank's)

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I bought 1kg of still-connected tipless chicken wings at Rewe for 5€, and I just used a knife to separate them. 

 

I only had 100 ml of hot sauce, so I reduced all the other sauce amounts proportionately (which was a pain the the ass).  with that much sauce it was just enough for 1kg.  The baking powder mix was just enough. 

 

pictures here

 

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On 8.11.2020, 23:01:28, CincyInDE said:

Crispy Oven Wings
2 tbsp aluminum-free baking powder
1 tbsp salt
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp black pepper

 

^^^^ mix this up and toss the raw wings in the powder
Bake at 220°C on baking paper for about 50 minutes

[...]

 

Ah, what's the baking powder for if there is no flour involved?

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On 11/8/2020, 11:01:28, CincyInDE said:

2 tbsp aluminum-free baking powder

 

In my kitchen, baking powder is sodium bicarbonate. Where's the alu in 'other' baking powder?

 

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4 hours ago, Metall said:

Ah, what's the baking powder for if there is no flour involved?

 

Methinks that it may be the secret to getting crispy wings from the oven. Mine were always soggy. Will try it.

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9 hours ago, Metall said:

 

Ah, what's the baking powder for if there is no flour involved?

 

My favorite cookbook (The Food Lab by Kenji Lopez) often provides answers to such questions, as the author takes a "scientific" approach to trying things out (head to head comparison of various methods...). Luckily he also has a blog describing why baking powder works wonders on chicken wings:

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2010/02/the-best-baked-buffalo-chicken-wings-in-oven-not-fried-appetizers.html

 

In there he also describes why baking soda (or the sodium bicarbonate from @HH_Sailor) does not work as well as baking powder (which includes a powdered acid, sometimes as an aluminum salt). 

I love cookbooks and have several, but I usually end up with a recipe from the Food Lab as a basis... If you like watching Alton Brown, you will like this book. 

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