What are you cooking today?

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Catfish never tasted muddy to me. We used to catch them in old tires when I was a kid. We wired the inside of the tire closed and then cut a hole on the outside. The mama catfish would come in them to lay eggs. We just put them in the water at chest level (I was little so mine weren't very deep) and then went back the next day and poured them out. Big fish in every one. I cannot even imagine how environmentally unfriendly that would be now. 

 

Mama made a big catfish stew and we also fried them. In those days it was "no fishy, no eaty". We were really feeding our family.

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Reusing an old tire as a fish trap is not environmentally unfriendly IMHO, sounds like multi use, too. Dive schools used to build artificial reefs out of tires to get the corals and sea life going.

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10 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Mama made a big catfish stew and we also fried them. In those days it was "no fishy, no eaty". We were really feeding our family.

 

 

I think in Japan eels had a similar function as catfish in the South - not considered the highest grade fish, but easy to catch and good to eat, sustaining entire families. :)

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5 minutes ago, Metall said:

Reusing an old tire as a fish trap is not environmentally unfriendly IMHO

 

I was referring to catching the mamas before they had their babies. We reused the tires over and over and they were refuse to begin with.

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Well, eels are caught with old meat and all sorts of offal including cattle heads etc. in simple basket traps (so not just laying females). Not very pretty but works. I remember hearing catfish can be caught that way, too.

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I just popped a whopping meatloaf into the oven, made with ground beef and pork sausage.  What made it whopping was a couple of handfuls of oatmeal flakes softened in milk and a cup or two of cooked quinoa.  I don't do a lot of cooking anymore, so I choose to make a lot and freeze it.  But we're supposed to eat more protein and less red meat, and I do it by adding mixed grains.  My first time with quinoa; maybe sometime I'll use several varieties of cooked beans, mashed.  Peppers, onions, celery, smoked paprika added; salt & pepper; ketchup spread across the top.

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Not today, but end of last week: We gathered champignons from a friendly farmer's meadow, and made a wonderful mushroom ragout with Semmelknödel... so, so good!

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1 hour ago, the.frollein said:

Not today, but end of last week: We gathered champignons from a friendly farmer's meadow, and made a wonderful mushroom ragout with Semmelknödel... so, so good!

Reminder to self- make cream of mushroom soup!

 

I have a bag of parsnips- roasted, mashed and enough for soup. Spicy and sweet.

I also used cloves/ mixed spice in many recipes, including roast pork!

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Well, I know what I'm not cooking tomorrow: "Pork "noodles", piggy tea, mustards, kombu and shony", a dish by Alyn Williams.

 

 "This beguiling dish from Alyn Williams features noodles, but not as you might know them - using strips of compressed pork skin. An aromatic broth of seaweed and herbs adds even more interest to this pork skin noodles recipe."

 

 Why not, you may ask? Well, because it's a starter (appetizer) which takes 4 hrs plus 36 hrs for the pig skin noodles alone, and begins:

 

  "Begin by preparing the pig skin. Use a sharp knife to remove as much fat from the inside of the belly skin as possible. Turn over and use a blowtorch to burn off any hairs."

 

Oh. my.

 

https://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/pork-skin-noodles-recipe

 

 

 

 

 

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Zucchini/courgette with Fusilli and mince, topped with cheese.

 

Cook the Fusilli until al dente then drain and place into a lasagne dish.

 

Fry the mince, chopped zucchini/courgette with a little olive oil and garlic. Season with paprika, salt and pepper. Once the mince is brown stir in a can of spicy chopped tomatos.

 

Pour the mince and zucchini/courgette sauce over the Fusilli and stir until the mix is even.

 

Top with grated cheese. Place into the oven until cheese is crispy.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Anna66 said:

Zucchini/courgette with Fusilli and mince, topped with cheese.

 

Cook the Fusilli until al dente then drain and place into a lasagne dish.

 

Fry the mince, chopped zucchini/courgette with a little olive oil and garlic. Season with paprika, salt and pepper. Once the mince is brown stir in a can of spicy chopped tomatos.

 

Pour the mince and zucchini/courgette sauce over the Fusilli and stir until the mix is even.

 

Top with grated cheese. Place into the oven until cheese is crispy.

 

 

 

oh that reminds me of something I haven't made in a long time, but should

 

skip the pasta (or serve it on the side), scoop out the seedy area from the courgettes and make mince filled, cheese topped "boats" out of it.  You can cook the boats in chopped or pureed tomatoes for something saucy, or just use a bit of paste in the meat if you want the flavor but no sauce.

 

I had a friend who introduced me to goat-cheese stuffed courgettes - those are great too, and even simpler:  scoop out the courgette, fill with mounded goatcheese, bake, and serve drizzled with olive oil, lemon juice, and scattered with mint.  equally delish but better on warmer days

 

me?  I ate.  but nothing worth reporting.

 

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On 9/30/2019, 8:54:06, food mom said:

Fresh olives are to be had at markets now. Saw some beautiful ones, and bought a (very) large handful.

 

Other than brining ("pickling") them or putting them in oil, anyone have any new and different ideas on what to do with them? Or how to cook them? I've cooked them with chicken and a tomato sauce (eintopf), don't want anything with beef, but lamb is welcome. Anyone?

 

Saw this recipe for mediterranean olive chicken. I go almost every week to get the lemon marinated olives from the market so good.

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Today I cooked some over roasted (read: burnt) brussel sprouts (that I had to peel down after roasting to get the scorch off), steamed some cauliflower that's been in the fridge forever. Finally roasted the  pumpkin (that's been hanging out in the fridge with the cauliflower) with a little olive oil and nutmeg and cinnamon. Also had some grilled olives that I picked up at the farmer's market.

 

Will have a little Balvenie DoubleWood Whiskey  for dessert with notes of honey, nuts. vanilla, spices (cinnamon and nutmeg, and dried fruit.  :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image result for balvenie whiskey

 

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