What are you cooking today?

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12 hours ago, lisa13 said:

might I recommend you add some mirin to the rice vinegar next time?  you could go as high as 50-50 I'd guess

 

Thanks. I just looked it up. Seems it's a Japanese rice wine similar to sake. Could I just substitute it for the rice wine vinegar? I don't need too many little bottles of rarely used ingredients in my cabinet. I have been seeing it in a lot of recipes lately. Must be in.

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8 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Thanks. I just looked it up. Seems it's a Japanese rice wine similar to sake. Could I just substitute it for the rice wine vinegar? I don't need too many little bottles of rarely used ingredients in my cabinet. I have been seeing it in a lot of recipes lately. Must be in.

 

Not vinegar.   Something like sherry or even white wine sweetened with sugar.

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58 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

Not vinegar.   Something like sherry or even white wine sweetened with sugar.

 

Or just some good, pure apple juice.

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

 

Thanks. I just looked it up. Seems it's a Japanese rice wine similar to sake. Could I just substitute it for the rice wine vinegar? I don't need too many little bottles of rarely used ingredients in my cabinet. I have been seeing it in a lot of recipes lately. Must be in.

as snowingagain already points out, it's not a vinegar - it has no acidity to speak of so they are not interchangeable

 

but it's very very common to mix it with rice vinegar to cut the sour as it is a bit sweet (among other things). I find it's pretty essential for achieving a proper japanese flavor profile.  BUT if you can't find the "good" mirin = Hon mirin - just go with sugar and possibly sherry or sake instead.  the lesser styles of mirin contain a lot of corn syrup so they are really not up to snuff.

 

eta:  if the single bottle solution is a must, you could also go for premade sushi rice seasoning.  I don't like it but we are all different :)

 

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As I said, I saw it was a rice wine similar to Sake - not vinegar. I'll pick some up and do a mix next time. Himself isn't a rice fan so I don't make it very often. Yesterday he was all German with "Where's the sauce?" 

 

Surely they will have the good one at my Asian shop.

 

Thanks!

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19 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

As I said, I saw it was a rice wine similar to Sake - not vinegar. I'll pick some up and do a mix next time. Himself isn't a rice fan so I don't make it very often. Yesterday he was all German with "Where's the sauce?" 

 

Surely they will have the good one at my Asian shop.

 

Thanks!

 

Sake and Rice wine are similar but not to Mirin, Mirin is sweeter with 16% sugar and 6% Glucose, here's a bottle I have which @lisa13 was referring to.

 

Mirin1.jpg.a7609fcaf74c8d3b5bee44c14faa6

 

If you manage to find a bottle then your a quarter of the way there to making your own Teriyaki sauce, the recipe I use is to add equal amounts of Mirin, Sake and light Soy Sauce with some sugar to taste and you have a Teriyaki sauce, also a grest accompliment to your Salmon dish in place of Rice wine Vinegar.

In the summer you can make this sauce up to marinate chicken wings to grill on the BBQ which is always a great dish so the Mirin hasn't got to sit in the cupboard for the one recipe.

 

May I also suggest one thing on your original post, instead of cooking the Broccoli separate cook it all together without the use of oil to make it a healthy dish, take a sheet of baking parchment/paper and place all your ingredients in the middle, except toasted Sesame seeds, and make into a parcel by folding the sides over and stapling together, cook in oven as you did for circa 15 minutes. Saves time with no fuss and will taste a lot better.:D

 

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Thanks for the tips. I prefer the broccoli roasted (carmelized and yummy) and only use a tablespoon of olive oil for a whole broccoli. Healthy enough. Things tend to steam in parchment paper and I like it crunchy. The next time, I will cook it a little first before adding the salmon so the salmon isn't over-cooked. Last night I had to take the salmon out early and continue cooking the broccoli.

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I made Himself eat rice and crunchy broccoli yesterday. He has just informed me that he is making fried Leberkäs with Spiegeleier today.

 

Win - no win.

 

 

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Pizza. That picture was inspiring.

1-2 grams of fresh yeast for 500 grams of all-purpose flour are enough.

Ran the cycle "dough" of my breadmaker two times and had to push down the dough later several times.

One pizza from half the dough is already eaten (frutti di mare), we are pretty full now. ^_^

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double trouble - what a handsome pair!  I'm skipping the courgette as I don't have one but I don't think that will matter.  I'll also saute the spices with the onion/tomato mix before adding the liquid but overall it looks promising

 

 

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it doesn't need a long cook - if you soak the lentils it takes 30 minutes  (10 minutes of sauteing and about 20 on a simmer to cook the lentils)

 

of course I used butter instead of olive oil, added hot chilis and threw in some beef stock (I know!  I'm going to hell) that I needed to use up...ok my method is nothing like those guys' but the principle is similar. It's just so easy to make dahl "yours" and it's so so good.

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Mimi Sheraton's The German Cookbook has a recipe for sour lentils that is quick and delicious.  No soaking required. Cook lentils in beef bouillon or broth until tender; add onions sauteed in butter. Add flour to thicken.  Salt and pepper.  Add a teaspoon or more of vinegar to each bowl, to taste.

The book, written in English and full of good recipes, is available from Amazon.

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Succotash!

I'm suppose to eat more vegetables and less animal fats, so I left out the bacon.

Put in good olive oil and a dash of soy sauce for taste. Yum.

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50 minutes ago, Metall said:

Succotash!

I'm suppose to eat more vegetables and less animal fats, so I left out the bacon.

Put in good olive oil and a dash of soy sauce for taste. Yum.

 

Out of interest where did you get the Lima Beans or Butter Beans as I know them.

 

I have only ever seen them here in Berlin in the frozen section but I don't need a kilo at a time.

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30 minutes ago, Sir Percy B said:

Out of interest where did you get the Lima Beans or Butter Beans as I know them.

 

I have only ever seen them here in Berlin in the frozen section but I don't need a kilo at a time.

 

The green lima beans are available frozen at the Metro - in German they are called "Dicke Bohnen", sometimes "Butterbohnen". I've seen them in the freezers in Asian stores, too.

A good replacement are frozen green soybeans aka edamame (without the pods).

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On 2/10/2019, 9:40:00, Sir Percy B said:

 

Out of interest where did you get the Lima Beans or Butter Beans as I know them.

 

I have only ever seen them here in Berlin in the frozen section but I don't need a kilo at a time.

 

Try a Turkish market. I've seen them fresh in the pod yesterday.

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I've never seen fresh lima beans anywhere in Germany, not even at local Turkish markets which I visit pretty frequently as they have a great array of veg.  Lima pods are quite large and look more like a pea pod - the pod is rather thin and can be "zipped" open, then simply pop the beans out similar to shucking fresh peas. 

 

Most of the broad beans I see here are in the direction of favas - the pod looks more like a string bean - more round than flat (though somewhat flat of course) - and they often have a spongy material inside around the beans that makes shucking them more difficult.

 

IME favas and similar varieties are a lot more work to prepare...first shuck them, then blanch so you can remove the thick skins on each bean, then finally prepare what's left for your meal.  Lima beans have a much thinner skin on the bean itself so you can simply prepare them (or just eat them!) straight from the pod.

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Don't eat any raw beans, this can cause health problems in people with a genetic disposition towards favism.

We already talked abput that on an earlier thread.

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