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Lactose-free products

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Hi all,

 

Just found out it's likely that I'm intolerant to lactose (something which has only happened since being in Germany!). The main problem for me is that I love cheese and creamy pasta sauces etc and now to be told I have to try to cut them out of my diet as much as possible is quite a daunting thought.

 

Does anyone know any good lactose-free products and where's best to get them- thinking along the lines of various cheeses (hard and soft), butter, ice cream, carbonara type pasta sauces...? (preferably shops in the Frankfurt area)

 

Also- what other products have lactose in them? Bread? Spreads? I really haven't thought about this! I'd probably manage in England and know where to go but not really too sure about the German take on it!

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Any of the Reformhaus coops would stock lactose-free products. Their shop assistants are supposed to be knowledgeable about their product range and its compatibility with the more common food intolerances and allergies (lactose, wheat, nut).

 

Just don't be convinced into trying the sauerkraut juice. It may be packed with healthy goodness and have a quadzillion health benefits (though I, personally, have my doubts), but it tastes... it tastes... Urrrghh!!!

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Frizzyjen, I use the Alpro soya products and you should be able to find them at most supermarkets in Frankfurt. I especially like their soy milk in the blue carton as it's fortified with calcium, B2, and B12 and is low in sugar. The flavored soymilks in this line have too much sugar for me. You can also get sauces in this line of products as well. You can also use the soy milk to make other dishes as a substitute for milk, I use it in my coffee, protein shakes,and to cook my oatmeal etc. I get lactose free cheese in a product called Minus-L you should be able to find that in your supermarket as well as I've seen it in a lot of stores here in my small town. I was at the reformhaus in my town the other day on a quest to find some soya cheese and I was told they didn't sell it and directed me to somewhere else that I haven't gone to check yet.

 

Btw, you asked me how did I cook the cabbage in another thread and I was not completely forthright with you. So I'm fessing up, I was actually braising it. It's those small thing in my life like not burning the cabbage (as I'm not a good cook) that sometimes bring me the biggest joy. So that's why I posted it in the Why are you happy today thread.

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Minus L is a German brand of Lactose Free products, I have used the milk, its just like regular milk without the lactose.

 

Aldi has its own line of Soya Milk, and Alpro Soya products have a cream substitute, I use that for sauces and soups.

 

Minus L and Alpro Products are avail at all larger grocery shops. Might not be at the corner Penny Markt, but Tengelmann, Rewe and Edeka carry them. They are much cheaper than Reformhauses.

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Thanks for all this guys... will definitely be having a look for these things!

 

I have tried soya-milk before but always found it had a sweet taste and so couldn't have it in hot drinks etc... is that all types of soya milk or just the stuff you get in the UK?

 

Have many people developed this type of intolerance since being in German and/or travelling?

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I am allergic not intolerant, so the Lactose tablets don't help me.

 

as an adult your body will produce less and less lactase to help digest the lactose, it affects everyone differently.

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what other products have lactose in them? Bread? Spreads?

 

 

Unfortunately you'd be surprised what other products have lactose in them, many breads, sausages / salami and cooking sauces include some form of milk. Factories tend to use a lot of milk based products as a thickening agent. Mayonaise is another one to check, as although it should include milk it depends on the brand. On the packets you can check for anything with Milch or Molke in the titel. It depends on how bad the alergy is, but a friend of mine is lactose intolerant and I have to check everything when she comes to stay because there can be traces of dairy in the most unexpected products.

You can still eat cheese if you eat goat's or ewe's milk as well as buffalo Mozzerella instead of cow's milk. I hope your doctor turns out to be worng, but it's definitely something you can get used to.

x

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It depends on how bad the alergy is, but a friend of mine is lactose intolerant

Lactose intolerance is not, technically, an allergic reaction. It's something that, pretty much and for our purposes, happens to us all. As we grow older, we produce less of the lactase enzyme which breaks down lactose sugar and if lactose starts to build up in the intestine, bad things happen.

 

Milk allergy is hypersensitivity to milk protein, sometimes labelled whey on food packaging. In this case, the body misrecognises the protein as an unwanted foreign intruder and activates its natural defence mechanism: the bad things which happen here are caused by the antibodies released by this inappropriate immune reaction.

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Uh, no worries. Really. My previous post wasn't aimed at you, or indeed, at anybody in particular. Lactose intolerance and milk allergies are easily and often confused, the symptoms are very similar, and, the basic message for a sufferer of either is, as you correctly pointed out, "avoid cow's milk".

 

The distinction becomes marginally more important if you're trying to be a little bit more sophisticated in your grocery shopping (or are just bored of soya), and, rather than a blanket avoidance of anything with milk in it, you attempt to specifically avoid lactose or milk proteins.

 

Also, with lactose intolerance, the body should, in most cases, still have some lactase and should still be breaking down lactose, just very slowly, so it's not vital to completely cut out milk. On the other hand, with allergies, it is possible that a trace amount can (but won't always) trigger an allergic reaction.

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A few years back, whenever I drank a glass of "Vollmilch" in the morning, I had a stomach upset and the associated trips to the toilet. I started drinking "Fettarm" and the problem went away... The funny thing is, in England, whenever I drink Full Fat milk, I'm fine...

 

I've never really given it much thought up until reading this post, but could it be that the milk in Germany is treated (or untreated) differently to that in England, and causing an adverse reaction?

 

I've not really noticed the problem in the last year TBH...

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Milk allergy is hypersensitivity to milk protein, sometimes labelled whey on food packaging. In this case, the body misrecognises the protein as an unwanted foreign intruder and activates its natural defence mechanism: the bad things which happen here are caused by the antibodies released by this inappropriate immune reaction.

i am allergic, but can still eat yougurt, seems the live culture in the yougurt helps in the digestion... but some yougurts don't have enough live culture and I end of with problems. I am bad sometimes and eat cheese, I know I will be sick for about 3 days afterwards and my skin goes all patchy, but certain cheese are okay for those with intolerances- the harder older cheeses have less lactose in them and they are much easier to digest.

I have to read package details, as alot of stuff has Whey in it which is a milk product too.

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I work (and learnt) in a Reformhaus in Wiesbaden... Many people suffer from Lactose intolerance and we're always happy to help! ;-)

 

We can also give you (usually) a bit of info / advice...

 

Phone / come see me if you want.

 

(Ask for Paul) ;-)

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Ok so last night went and attempted my first major lactose-free shop... went alright although am still amazed at some of the products that contain it e.g. Pringles! Anyway, managed to procure myself some milk, yoghurt/pudding things and some margarine but couldn't find any cheese anywhere...

 

I went to Aldi, Penny and 2 Rewes and nothing. I know Reformhaus was mentioned- can anyone tell me where there is one in Frankfurt/near Bockenheim (admetus maybe??? ;) ) I really love cheese and I think this will be one of the things I miss most... especially since I'm a fan of all different varieties!

 

And finally... any good brands of/places to buy bread... bought some that I thought was OK and have double checked the label and now see that it may contain 'some traces of milk products'!

 

Any advice would be most welcome as I'm off work sick yet again with what feels like the after-effects of having eaten something I shouldn't have!!!

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Hi Jen,

I guess cheese is the one really difficult thing. You can eat Feta (made with goat's milk) or buffalo mozzerella, plus any other cheeses that are made from any milk other than cow's. It may take a while to get used to, but chevroux for example is a not too strong spreadable goat's cheese. I'll try and wrack my brains to remeber the name of another Ewe's milk cheese which is a bit like brie... anyone know it? Roqufort is okay too (you like Stilton right?)

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Roqufort is okay too (you like Stilton right?)

No? Really??? I have a big lump of Roquefort in the fridge that I haven't wanted to touch since the doc told me to stay away from dairy... I love it as well- wish I'd known sooner!!!

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Plus also sells a lactose-free milk and a soya one too as part of their Viva Vital range - it is v. cheap too.

If your intolerance is quite high, watch lables regarding cheeses as some may have problems with cross-contamination from cow's milk products made on the same site (as stated on Plus' Viva Vital goat's cheeses).

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You can eat Feta (made with goat's milk) or buffalo mozzerella

I too found out that I was lactose intolerant only as I started getting stomach problems after moving to Germany. But anyway, onto more useful info - first the pedantic corrections that feta is made from sheep's milk. Watch out though, because sometimes feta can be made from cow's milk as I saw several times in supermarkets here and in England. Also my doctor said buffalo mozarella is still to avoid if you're not meant to have lactose from cow's milk.

 

Edit: useless info on shops in Munich removed ;) must read more carefully next time!

 

And yes, be REALLY careful with ready-made products. They put lactose in the strangest of things including snacks like crisps, as well as medication.

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THe doctor didn't specify which dairy, just gave me a generic don't eat 'milchprodukte' for the next few weeks and see if it helps, which it seemed to be doing until I went to Dublin this weekend and kind of 'forgot' the regime I was meant to be sticking to... I blame the Magners (or Bulmers, whichever you prefer!)

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Ah, in such a case either quickly ring your doctor's to check, or yes, avoid all dairy products.

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