Where to buy homebrew ingredients

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Good point Mr '6.

 

Having breweed my own in Saudi very often, both beer and wine I might recommend wine here. Berr no. Waste oif tiem.

 

sorry for the crap typingits feredrweisen.

 

if you find wine makeing stuff here let me know.

 

Jeremy

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The equipment isn't expensive.. in fact, you could do it with a plastic garbage bin if you knew what you were doing.

 

I do agree that with beer so good and so cheap here there is absoultely no reason to do it though..

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Again - why would you want to do this when you are Bavaria. My God man you have Augusteiner Helles there -the nectar of the Gods - and its cheap. I'm in dublin where you gotta pay 5euro for a minging pint of shite larger.

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we did it at university and i guess it worked out at not much cheaper than buying a case of beer here. it is fun producing your own but i don't think you'll produce an augustiner rival!

 

however, we also tried one where we followed the instructions on the amount of sugar you add. 1 bag (2lb) for 4%, 2 bags for 8% and 3 for 12%. well, you know what we did. pretty foul stuff but as students, two halves of that before we went out gave you a pretty substantial head start!

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It's only worth doing for a laugh, but thats true of loads of shit. I wanted to make a load this year, but my hops crop did not go as expected. I know of a few hops growing wild, so hopefully next year I'll have enough. I bet it will taste like utter shite though.

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where does one buy hops seed. any suggestions for planting? i just accuired myself a garden, thought it would be nice to have hops growing in it. (usage later might also be cool)

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@ iain, try a garden centre. the botanical name is Humulus lupulus and I've seen growing plants for sale during spring and summer. Now's not really the time, so wait until Spring again as this is a perennial climber and will come back each year once you cut it back in late summer for your harvest!! There's an attractive golden version, H. l. 'Aureus' if you want it as a decorative and functional plant but I'm not sure how the yield is affected by creating this cultivar.

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Does anyone have any information on this type a thing? Im going to attempt it. The craic will be ninety on keg opening night in the distant distant future

Well, I´d recommend the following book by Dave Miller:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/088266905...283155&v=glance

 

and although I haven´t read the following, it looks good as well (in German):

http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3405...4873670-2969617

 

 

Why would you want to do this? - to do it properly the equipment is expensive, and the results mediocre to say the least. If we were in Saudi, or even UK, where beer is restricted or prices are high, I could understand it, but here in the beer capital of Europe (the world?) where a pint/half litre of good beer costs 50cents, and crap beer can be had for 30cents or less what does it bring you?...

 

YL6 (hic!)

Come on YL6! Haven´t you ever fiddled around with your computer before? or felt the satisfaction/wonder/respect for a great home-cooked meal? Same applies to homebrewing. In addition, if you brew at home, you don´t have to follow the Reinheitsgebot. So you can experiment with Belgian lambics, or Wit beers, or American style beer etc. Why not try putting Vanilla, Curacao, or Cinnammon in the beer? The variations are endless.

 

 

@ iain, try a garden centre. the botanical name is Humulus lupulus and I've seen growing plants for sale during spring and summer. Now's not really the time, so wait until Spring again as this is a perennial climber and will come back each year once you cut it back in late summer for your harvest!! There's an attractive golden version, H. l. 'Aureus' if you want it as a decorative and functional plant but I'm not sure how the yield is affected by creating this cultivar.

If you do plant, make sure you cultivate only the female plants - they´re the only valuable ones ref Lupulin (that´s what one uses, the Lupulin)

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I'm gonna brew some of my own... sure it is cheap right across the street, and delicious, but what better reference to have. and if you make it somewhat often, i dont think it's really that much more expensive. i live across the street from a brewery, and i love the smell of the beer cooking. i just hope the smell is not too intense and therefore a negative expereince doing it myself. besides, it will be fun to try to make a beer that tastes like a real "Helles". then start my own brewery, and get bought out by paulaner.

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Yes, YL6 is talking pants, homebrewing is easy and the results good. You pay careful attention to simple stuff like keeping everything clean and the barrel and everything that comes into contact with fermenting beer sanitised and the results are great. Sure the stuff you get here isn't bad beer, but you just can't get a good ale, or a bitter, or a porter - just lots of very similar, golden, fizzy stuff.

 

So, here's a short summary:

 

Here is a shop just outside Munich, they're friendly and you can get there easily:

http://www.brauexpress.de/

 

You need a big saucepan. Go into a shop in town and pay 150-300 euro or go to the hotel section on eBay

http://business.search.ebay.de/topf_Gastro...W0QQsacatZ11874

And get one for 20 euro. Look for one about 20 litres capacity with a 12mm base

 

This place has everything but the delivery can be slow and they're impossible to get on the phone:

http://www.promille.de/

The Kaiserbrauset 2 is a bit of an outlay but contains everything you need except the big saucepan.

 

Here you can get extracts at low prices:

http://www.selbstgebraut.de/

 

The best book about homebrewing is by Charlie Papazian -

Complete Joy of Homebrewing!. I've followed it extensively and never been disappointed. There's a simple 'let's make beer' section, then a complete guide to everything else.

 

The method: Open 2 tins of extract, empty the contents into 5l of hot water, boil for an hour, adding hops if you like. Cool to approx 40C, sterilise your barrel using household bleach, rinse carefully with clean water, fill with 15l cold Munich tap water. Add your cooled boiled extract. Check temperture is not over 25C and add your yeast. Seal with fermentation lock that allows pressure out without letting air in. Wait 2 weeks. Drink.

 

Edit: And the reinheitsgebot is pants - it doesn't allow for the use of yeast. It's like a law describing how to build houses that prohibits the use of cement.

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ooh hellesangel! now i know it's not a nice pint of ale (oh i miss hook norton twelve days), but a good dunkeles weizen is a pleasure and a second, doubly so!

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By the way, I'm having a quiet night in, catching up on some jobs, but for company I've got 20 litres of beer very similar to Old Peculier that I made myself. It's bottle conditioned real ale, a bit lighter in alcohol than Old Pec but the same rich chocolate/nut taste and deep colour. And I'm in Munich and didn't have to import it myself, or pay any tax. There's another 25 litres of English bitter that's nearly ready, and I'm pondering how to improve the recipe for the next one.

 

If you're happy with Munich Helles then all power too you, but this, my friends, is my definition of heaven.

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i cant say i'm an expert, but i would doubt the claim that the reinheitsgebot doesnt include yeast. i am pretty sure yeast is one of the four primary, necessary ingredients. now if it is true, i think a lot of people could have a potential embarassment on their hands, and have had, for a few hundred years. i personally am going to look for the text right now, to try to verify (with my kindergarten Deutsch) your claim, Helles. oh, btw, does that brauexpress have a walk-in shop to buy stuff, or is only via internet?

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The reinheitsgebot was written before people knew of the existence of yeast. My memory is not serving me very well after the long weekend, but didn't we already have a discussion about the worthlessnes of that law?

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i skipped to the end, but there is a tiny little shop behind Hofbraü, on the same alley as ATOMIC CAFE, and I think they have all the fix'ns for home brew stuff. i remember rolling into a back-alley beer-fest of some sort last summer.

 

Might just be a Öko grain/bread maker supply, but i think they have all the stuff for cvarious beers/homebrews there.

 

Leme know, Id love to do my own as well. (Never tried, and I do like beer.)

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As Sam Adams ads used to call it, here's a bit from the Wikipedia article on the "ReinHEITSgeboot":

 

 

Interessanterweise ist bis hier nirgends von Hefe die Rede, obwohl sie für den Brauprozesses unabdingbar ist. Als Grund dafür wird häufig angenommen, dass die Existenz derartiger Mikroorganismen schlicht noch unbekannt war. Dies stimmt nur insofern, als nicht bekannt war, dass Hefe aus einer großen Menge von Mikroorganismen besteht, und wie die genaue Wirkungsweise der Hefe bei der alkoholischen Gärung ist. Hefe an sich war bekannt, Brauer gaben einfach das "Zeug" vom letzten Gärvorgang der neu zu vergärenden Bier-Würze zu. Im Münchner Bäcker- und Brauerstreit war es bereits 1481 darum gegangen, ob die Bäcker den Brauern deren bei der Gärung gebildete Überschusshefe nach altem Brauch abkaufen müssen. Streng genommen konnte und kann also Bier nicht nach dem bayerischen Reinheitsgebot gebraut werden und Weizen- oder Roggenbier sogar zweimal nicht.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinheitsgebot

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btw, one can aquire the equipment side of the wine/beer brewing hobby at samen-somthing-or-other on the Viktualienmarkt. it's near Nordsee and has tons of plants out front. upstairs there they have the containers, tubes, and measuring devices. i am still looking for somewhere local to buy the hops, yeast, and malt, and preferably not in the pre-combined kit form. oh well, i have enough to get started, but eventually one needs to start tinkering.

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Sure, people knew about yeast, it´s a rather obvious biomass that forms. I think though they thought it was just a byproduct of the beer making process. Some batches worked some didn´t, and those that did always had this strange biomass (either as sediment or floating on top.) It wasn´t thought of as essential, otherwise it´d have been put in the Reinheitsgebot. Even today, some beers are still made via a process called "spontaneous fermentation", whereby yeast is not artificially added. A brew is made and left in a special room whereupon naturally living yeast cells somehow get into the beer. I visited a brewery in Belgium where their spontaneous fermentation room was so special, that during a roof renovation, they left the old roof there and simply built a new one over it. The point was not to disturb the existing environment of the yeast. Yeast is/was known as the Geist i.e. spirit of the beer. The successful brewers of old knew how to create the right conditions and how to propagate them - hence their status as artisans. Brewing wasn´t just cookbook recipes, it was/is an art.

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ok, question for anyone who has some experience with this...

 

my lager is through the primary fermentation, but i am afraid it is contaminated. it has maybe two days left to ferment, but there is a dark mass on the edge of the foam. much of the top of the foam has those small gatherings of yeast, which are the same color i think yeast should be... i mean like what i always see in the bottom of my weißbier glass. but there is this other thing. darker, greyer, greener. the beer currently gives off a mild pungent odor, which i took as a bad sign, but another friend says not to worry about it.

 

details for anyone who cares...

..from hopped malt extract, fermenting with dry lager yeast.

 

thanks

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