Notar / notaries / notary public

59 posts in this topic

Thought I would provide an update on using the American Consulate as a notary as I just went today. First you first have to make an appointment online--you CANNOT go to the consulate without an appointment. The people in front of us were turned away.

 

If there are two of you to sign the form you're getting notarized, you must make two appointments (although you end up doing the appointment together. I think the point is that they want to have the passport numbers of all those showing up there so they can be checked ahead of time, but I'm just guessing.) You do this online on their website (http://germany.usembassy.gov/acs/munichacs.html). On the right hand side it says "make an appointment." You click on this and follow the instructions from there. The time of the appt. is the time you have to arrive for the security screening.

 

You must bring your reservation sheet with you (you get it after you've made your appointment), along with your passport and the from you need to sign and have notarized. The appts. are daily (when there is availability) between 1-3pm (they stop notarizing at 4pm so the last appointment is usually around 3). You have to wait outside until they check your reservation, then you go through an airport-like security screening (there was no one else there so it took all of 1 minute). Then you go into the main building, give them your reservation, passport(s) and the papers you'll be signing (remember not to sign them first, as the point of the notary is to check that you are who you say you are (hence the passport) and to swear that they've seen you personally sign the document--but do fill in any dates/places etc.).

 

They ask you to go pay the cashier, you give them the receipt, they make you wait a few minutes while they "prepare" the papers (they typed in the date and stamped pertinent info on it). Then they'll ask if you've read and understand the document you're about to sign, and if you're signing it willingly. They are not allowed to explain it to you. You sign, they sign and stamp it with their seal. It took less than 1/2 hour from arrival at the gate to departure, and cost 30 Euros. Painless and easy, and no translations required (and comparatively cheap from what I've heard). Hope that's helpful!

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Contacted the Australian Embassy in Berlin, but I keep getting bounced around with no decent answer.

 

So,I thought someone on TT might have an idea. I need to get some documents notarised for the Australian government.

I am located in Munich. Where can I go to get this done?

 

I called the Visa section, who told me to call the consular section, who told me to call the visa section, who was too busy to answer my call.

If someone can give me a direction to go and end this bouncing around, I would be very thankful!

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OK. I gave up on Berlin and called the consulate in Frankfurt who was much more polite on the phone and gave indication she was actually listening to me.

 

FYI, for Aussies to get their documents notarised, you can send your original document and the copy over to the Frankfurt consulate, scroll down to the bottom of this page: http://www.germany.embassy.gov.au/belngerman/MarriageGer.html and download "credit card authorisation form" under the "Bank details for Frankfurt section.

 

Each document costs 19 Euros. You should send it by registered mail (for obvious reasons).

 

Better still, you should call them first before getting onto it as everyone's case might differ a little.

 

Hope this helps somebody else!

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Hi everyone, I am new here, just registered. I need help NOW. I am leaving the country next week and one of my passports is in the US Consulate. I wanted to leave my fiancé a notarized power of attorney so that he can pick up my passport in case they release it and I'm not here. I have no idea how things work here because I am from Venezuela, things are pretty different over there. I need to get this done by tomorrow or Monday at the latest. Can anyone help me out? I'm actually not sure if the US consulate allows someone else to pick it up or what the person would have to take, but I have called and wrote several emails and got no answer, so if anyone knows about this as well that would be Great!!

 

Thank you!!!

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Hello, I have searched the threads and dont see any info on this topic. I am hoping someone may help.

 

I have paid for a property via auction, to date I have a document from a notary in Berlin entitled "Verhandelt" which lists the property, the sellers and my name etc.

 

I now need to transfer the property to a friend for whom I bid on the auction. My question, if any of you know, are can I transfer the title just now? IE make a new Verhandelt before I have any other documents?

 

If so can anyone recommend a good notary which speaks English? The one who sent me the documents doesn't and is not too helpful.

 

many thanks to any forum member who may be able to help.

 

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

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For any Americans who need a notary that can do more than just certify that you are the person who signed a particular document (which is about all that the US Consulate will do) and who is willing* to pay more in travel than for the notary itself, there is a NY lawer/notary based in London.

 

He took care of what I needed, acting both as my attorney and the notary public for the same reasonable rate he would have charged just for the notary work (contact him, not me, for the rates).

 

http://www.dottedlineglobal.com/

 

*In my case, I just made a nice long-weekend with the wife in London out of it.

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That's interesting that he is able to notarize documents outside of the state in which he has been given the right to notarize documents. My understanding was that states don't allow that. I got whacked by the US Consulate in Frankfurt for 50 USD per copy. They justify the cost by saying it is a diplomatic notarization and not just some secretary in the US who has a notary public stamp. Although the result is the same, your signature is verified.

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Although the result is the same, your signature is verified.

 

The result was not the same for me. My case was complex and the Consulate refused to do it. My post is aimed at Americans in a situation in which the consulate was unable to do it.

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Dear Admin, I wondered why this post has been moved to the Munich thread, I am not presently in Munich and the property is in a different part of Germany.

 

Please update your location:

 

post-4788-13992846321709.png

 

The admins and mods have to rely on information provided by the forum members. Topics are moved or merged accordingly.

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You will need an appointment with the Consulate. The procedure itself is easy, bring the document, your passport and cash, leave everything else with the guards at the entry. They are not open for notarial services every day but you have to jump through lots of hoops until you get to the calendar.

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And do not bring a tablet with...otherwise you'll have to check it in at a nearby local market store. Found that one out the hard way.

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Thanks, guys. I deleted my post because I went online and got an appointment for Thur. afternoon for notorial stuff ez pz. At first, the appointment feature wasn't working and it kept saying try again later. That is why I inquired, in case they wouldn't do it anyway.

 

Couldn't have been easier. Now we'll see what happens when I get there - handylos.

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[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

 

Hi everyone!

 

I posted here assuming some of you might have passed through the same process. So we are in the process of applying for a visa reunion(My wife and son) and they requested an "agreement from a parent in Germany (that is me)" - stating that I agree that my child will be transfered to me. And this needs to be notarized. Do you have an experience with this? Can you recommend a notary service? Or maybe you have a draft of it?

Any advice is much appreciated.

 

Thanks!

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Hi good people of Toytown,

 

I need a notary to designate a POA (power of attorney) for the refinance of the house I own in the US. The consulate is not taking appointments for notarial services during COVID unless it is a emergency and don't think this qualifies.

The closing attorney for the bank indicated that a German notary should be acceptable.

If someone knows a helpful German notary in Munich that is happy to transact in English I would greatly appreciate the recommendation. It's a simple form but will be in English.I live near Rotzkreuzplatz, anywhere fairly central would be fine.

 

Thanks in advance!

Maureen

 

 

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Many U.S. states have introduced new rules for remote notarization.  Something unthinkable most places before March has now become reality.  Rules vary from state to state.  You might be able to do it from home with a U.S. notary public.

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https://www.nixonpeabody.com/en/ideas/blog/trusts-and-estates/2020/04/29/massachusetts-allows-virtual-notarization-during-the-covid-19-state-of-emergency

23 states have enacted a permanent "remote online notarization" law. These laws generally purport to allow a notary licensed in that state to notarize documents that are being signed by a person who is located in another state (or country). Several companies have sprung up to provide this service.

 

https://www.dlapiper.com/en/us/insights/publications/2020/03/coronavirus-federal-and-state-governments-work-quickly-to-enable-remote-online-notarization/

UPDATE [June 30] – On June 26, Colorado became the 26th state to enact remote notarization (SB20-096). The RON provisions of the bill take effect December 31, 2020. Notably the bill prohibits the use or sale of personal information of a remotely located individual by a remote notary and the provider of a remote notarization system except in limited circumstances.

The basic components of each state’s RON law are to:

  • Allows notarial acts to be completed using audio-video communication, including acts where the signer is located outside the state in which the notary is authorized to operate;

  • Require that the notary authenticate the person signing; and

  • Require recording of the audio-video communication.*

The state RON laws are very detailed and vary with respect to, among other things, authentication, journaling and retention periods. 

In states that have yet to enact RON or otherwise make their RON law effective, emergency short-term measures are being issued. The below chart reviews each state and any RON law and/or emergency order enacted in such state: ...

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See also Notarize.com  " While signers can be located abroad, Notarize only serves documents for use in the United States."

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