Notar / notaries / notary public

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I need to get some UK legal paperwork signed and notarised over here in Munich. The question is, can anyone tell me who can help with this task? I always prefer to take personal recommendations and experience over pot luck in choosing somewhere.

 

Thanks in advance!

Pootle

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There's a place which is at Elisenhof 3 just near the Hauptbahnhof. I can't remember the guys name but it's on the sign. Think they're up on the fifth floor. Anyways, I've been there a couple of times to get stuff notarised and there's never a problem

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Twice I've gotten things notarised in Munich.

 

I had passport copies notarised in the American consulate (Königinstrasse, Lehel) for something to do with American/offshore tax relations.

 

And I went to the French consulate to sign a power of attorney for a French flat I'm buying. Actually the legal assistant recommended I don't sign it, but to give limited power of attorney for the action namely closing the sale.

 

So Irish didn't ask for but got good advice from the French consulate.

 

Ring the British consulate (Bürkleinstrasse, Lehel) and explain your problem, thats free and the answer is that probably only they can notarise. And you might get some good advice from a bored consulare official.

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Notars tend to be pretty well educated but in general they won't read through the contract in English. This is more for legal reasons than anything else - the contract must be read out loud in german.

 

You need to get a translator to translate what the notar says - and not just a friend who speaks good english/german - the language in a contract is full of legal terms that need an expert's help.

 

Maybe someone on the forum can recommend someone?

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Yes, a contract MUST be read aloud in German, but if the notary is fluent enough in a foreign lingo, he or she will read it out in that as well - more for convenience than anything else. A signed contract may also include a translation of the German text, but it will include a clause that states that in case of doubt the German version shall prevail.

 

And to clear it up - I'm a Notary under English law, and therefore can't practice here in Munich - my boss however is a German national, qualified and admitted in Bavaria - she speaks German (obviously) and French and English as well.

 

I can't EVER offer a discount as fees are set by law. I am also bound by client confidentiality - I cannot and will not discuss anything with anybody if you do come and see me. Or at least not when you're about.

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And just one more time ALL notaries charge the same - our fees are fixed by law so you'll never see more than a couple of Euros difference between different Notariats. You will also NEVER find any Notaries advertising, as this is also forbidden.

So there you have it fact fans.

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Thanks for the info! Called the British Counsel and they can do it. I just need photocopies of my birth cert and passport certified, so no need for a translation or anything. They charge E25 for minimum five copies just for your info.

 

And it is "FORBIDDEN for notaries to advertise"? How bizarre. Does that mean they aren't in the yellow pages?

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British Consulate is the other way - and if they do five separate documents for €25 they're a fair bit cheaper than us. If they bundle them altogether as one compelete document (and this document should be sewn together with string and be sealed with a 'wax' seal), then they're a little bit more expensive than us.

 

And yes, it's forbidden to advertise - we're in the phone book, but you won't find any large 'boxed' adverts or such like - just a list of notaries.

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Yeah, the British Consulate will give me five certified copies of my passport and birth certificate for E25.00. You think that's reasonable? I thought it was a bit much coz all they have to do is look at my passport and the photocopy and say: yup, that's you and sign away...oder?

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Believe me - that's reasonable. In London I'd charge somewhere between 60 and 100 pounds depending on whether you want them separate or not.

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I too need to find a US notary. Really must get some docs notarized Monday, only to find that US Consulate is open from 1-4 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays only (for notarial services). Now that's service.

 

Shouldn't they be willing to do it anytime they're open? A US notary doesn't do much other than watch you sign, check your ID, emboss and sign and send you on your way. Two minutes max.

 

Anyway, if anyone here is or knows a notary, I am willing to pay well for the service and come to you.

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It can only be done at the Consulate for an Official Seal. Oh and it costs a bundle for each document.

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I was afraid of that, but really don't understand why a regular US notary living here couldn't do it. And the prices are indeed very high compared to the average stateside (although perhaps lower than countries where the notaries have to do more or be more qualified).

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Notaries are the realm of the individual states. So, only persons who meet the definition of "notarizing officer" may notarize documents at a U.S. embassy or consulate where the term "notarizing officer" at a U.S. embassy or consulate includes consular officers, officers of the Foreign Service who are secretaries of embassy or legation under 22 U.S.C. 4221 and such U.S. citizen employees as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Overseas Citizens Services may designate for the purpose of performing notarial acts overseas pursuant to the Foreign Relations Authorization Act.

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A German notary is perfectly acceptable - they will charge you though, and will charge according to the value of the transaction. What are you doing - house purchase/sale perhaps?

 

EDIT: A German notary does have an official seal, as will any notary anywhere in the world. If you use a German notary you MIGHT need the documents to be apostilled. That's fairly unlikely though I'd say. (btw, I'm a notary, but I'm in London - use the TT wiki for more info on notaries).

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Hi everybody, and thanks for taking the time to read this boring dross... If anybody knows where I can find a list of English/French-speaking notaries in Munich, I'd be very grateful. We're busy buying a house and narrowly avoided a major catastrophe, when we realized at the Notar's last wednesday that the developers were selling us offices whilst letting us believe it was a flat. Now they say they're busy changing the land registry but we don't really trust their notary anymore, as he never pointed out that the premises (at the time) could only be used as offices and therefore weren't habitable, which we believe would have been his duty.

 

Any info would be welcome.

Thanks

Laure and Phil

 

Topics merged by admin

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...we don't really trust their notary anymore, as he never pointed out that the premises (at the time) could only be used as offices and therefore weren't habitable, which we believe would have been his duty.

There is no such thing as a "their notary" as a notary does not take sides. It's up to the notary to make sure you understand what you are signing; it's not up to him to advise you, or point out any pitfalls. You should have the contract independantly checked prior to visiting the notary, so you KNOW what you are signing before you sign it.

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thanks for your comment, we know he wasn't really "theirs", it's just that they chose him and send a lot of business his way year in year out. Our translator told us that he couldn't get any straight answers out of him and got increasingly nervous. We weren't asking for advice, just whether we'd be able to live in our home unimpeded... He wasn't necessarily crooked, but we'd rather have a notary who isn't the seller's buddy and is willing to speak at least a few words of English.

 

There must be a website somewhere with a list of multilingual notaries on it but we can't find it.

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We're thinking of buying 2 appartments and uniting them to have one large apartment, would this raise any special tax issues that anybody would be aware of ? Would a notary be the right kind of person to ask about any tax implications ?

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