Dual transmission of dubbed and undubbed TV shows

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I like nothing more than to restart a 5 year old thread. So, simply for the sake of repeating the question, why the bobbins doesn't German tv ever show anything in OV, i've found watching TV here has massively helped improve my German, but it would be nice to watch an interview with someone as eminent as Richard Dawkins without the same worn out sounding German voice over actor trying to keep up..

 

As has been said a few times, it's a rights issue. German broadcasters buy the rights for a german broadcast and, to put it in simple terms, they pay by how many audience members they can potentially reach. Those numbers are calculated by the german speaking audience. As german broadcasters broadcast free to air over the whole of europe, they'd have to pay a shitload more if they start buying english broadcasting rights.

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As has been said a few times, it's a rights issue. German broadcasters buy the rights for a german broadcast and, to put it in simple terms, they pay by how many audience members they can potentially reach. Those numbers are calculated by the german speaking audience. As german broadcasters broadcast free to air over the whole of europe, they'd have to pay a shitload more if they start buying english broadcasting rights.

 

Ok Bob Loblaw, (Arrested Development fan by any chance?)so what you're saying is that the dubbing is not only done to make it 'easier' for German speaking viewers to understand what they're watching but also to block out the original language for which they would have to pay more?

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Ok Bob Loblaw, (Arrested Development fan by any chance?)so what you're saying is that the dubbing is not only done to make it 'easier' for German speaking viewers to understand what they're watching but also to block out the original language for which they would have to pay more?

 

German channels broadcast their signal free-to-air over satellite. This is very convenient as Germans don't need any special decoding equipment to watch German TV by satellite. The downside to this is that the signal is also readily available to everyone else throughout Europe. As long as the German channels broadcast only in German, when negotiating with the rights holders, they can argue that even though their signal reaches all Europeans, their effective audience is just the German-speaking public, as hardly anyone will bother watching a movie in a language he can't understand. If German stations wanted to broadcast movies in other languages as well, then the rights holders would start asking for higher prices as the potential audience would be significantly larger.

 

Italian and Turkish TV stations, which also broadcast free-to-air across areas much larger than their national territory, follow the same policy: they only broadcast movies dubbed in the country's language. The BBC follows a slightly different approach: it broadcasts free-to-air (in English, of course), but uses special satellite transponders which are focused on the British Isles so as to limit the signal's reach (with a 1m dish, the signal can still be picked up as far away as Munich, though).

 

TV stations from countries like the Netherlands, Denmark, Finland, Greece which typically show movies in the original language with subtitles are not available in free-to-air form over satellite. The signals are encrypted, and you need to purchase special decoding equipment to receive them, which you can only get if you're a resident of the country - in theory, at least. This makes satellite TV a more expensive, more complicated, and consequently less attractive option in these countries compared to the alternatives (cable, digital terrestrial).

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It's quite straightforward. Let's say the broadcasters have to pay x€ to the rights holders to broadcast a movie in German. Its they were to simultran it in English they'd have to pay (x+y)€ where y is the additional licensing fee for the English original content. Given that a large proportion of their income is generated from advertising to their primary German speaking audience there is little incentive to pay the y€ for the English speakers who have little or no interest in the advertising they offer and therefore offer no commercial incentive for them to offer the second language.

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Well more Germans should speak facking English then shouldn't they? Inconsiderate feckers.

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Can you Imagine them translating Hausmeister Kraus into English??

 

Its not even remotely funny in German!

 

MrBean with Subtitles and translated??? :lol:

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theres plenty of english language stuff on german channels if youre prepared to pay a few euro for it.

 

Channels like Fox, TNT Series, TNT Movies Syfy, 13th street, National geographic, History Channel to mention just a few that have english original audio on the second audio option for no extra cost (over the cost of getting the channel in the first place), at least if you order it via sky.

 

And sky movies various channels along with TNT movies also has english language.

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but this is cable, and the reason these channels have english adio, is because most of them is english language originally.

 

I am in germany for a few weeks on business and the place i am sleeping has sky subscription, sky is probably a subcompany from bskyb, which is in the news lately in the U.S., which is how i now it. TNT and so on probably already own the rights to the originals, so broadcasting in english doesn't require purchasing new licenses, so the only costs are for the german version.

 

And i don't think that there is a big audience in Germany for English language tv shows and movies, because germans aren't really proficient in the english language. On a short trip to the netherlands, they were much better with speaking english. I don't know much about other countries, but i think the average german doesn't really speak english. Another example are german tourist in the U.S., most of them barely get by. With this i mean tourist, not business visitors or other professionals.

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but this is cable, and the reason these channels have english adio, is because most of them is english language originally.

 

I am in germany for a few weeks on business and the place i am sleeping has sky subscription, sky is probably a subcompany from bskyb, which is in the news lately in the U.S., which is how i now it. TNT and so on probably already own the rights to the originals, so broadcasting in english doesn't require purchasing new licenses, so the only costs are for the german version.

 

And i don't think that there is a big audience in Germany for English language tv shows and movies, because germans aren't really proficient in the english language. On a short trip to the netherlands, they were much better with speaking english. I don't know much about other countries, but i think the average german doesn't really speak english. Another example are german tourist in the U.S., most of them barely get by. With this i mean tourist, not business visitors or other professionals.

 

One of the reasons why German's are not so good with English is because they dub their TV shows. Have a look at all the European countries which tend to be better in English and you will generally find that they don't dub.

 

Maybe countries like Germany who dub TV shows loose respect over time with recorded audio. Who knows where they will take it next... dubbing music? Afterall, if an actors voice (which is 90% of the acting) is not important enough to keep, why keep singers voices as well... Oh... already been there Germany... Milli Vanilli...

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One of the reasons why German's are not so good with English is because they dub their TV shows. Have a look at all the European countries which tend to be better in English and you will generally find that they don't dub.

 

Maybe countries like Germany who dub TV shows loose respect over time with recorded audio. Who knows where they will take it next... dubbing music? Afterall, if an actors voice (which is 90% of the acting) is not important enough to keep, why keep singers voices as well... Oh... already been there Germany... Milli Vanilli...

 

i don't use this term alot but in this case: LOL

 

I just found out that most movies that aren't for children aren't dubbed in the netherlands, they have subtitles but they aren't dubbed.

 

Germany probably makes alot of money from this industry.

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I have worked in film, television, and commercials since 2000 in the States. It is so strange that in Europe that they dub films and shows. But I do understand they generate money by having such a large voice-over industry. I would assume it is decent paying industry to be in.

 

But I think subtitles are better. Seeing actors perform is an art, and when you dub things it really takes away from that art form.

 

The sad thing is when I go to get a non-English film, I am lucky if it has English Subtitles here. I may miss out on several good films, because they are dubbed into German. That is sort of sad.

 

Of course when I lived in the US, I thought it was dumb that Spanish networks like Telemundo did not provide English subtitles. In the US most networks have Spanish and French subtitles. But the Spanish networks only have Spanish subtitles. They limit their audience.

 

IF ANYONE KNOWS WHERE TO STREAM OR DOWNLOAD SHOWS ONLINE MESSAGE ME!

 

And hopefully Hulu will eventually start streaming in Europe!

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i don't use this term alot but in this case: LOL

 

I just found out that most movies that aren't for children aren't dubbed in the netherlands, they have subtitles but they aren't dubbed.

 

Germany probably makes alot of money from this industry.

 

Maybe the German Language market( Switzerland, Austria, Germany) is a wee bit larger than the netherlands.

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Absolutely, MLD. Yet it is also one of the main reasons people from the Netherlands, Denmark and the Scandinavian countries are so much more fluent in English than those from larger countries: from the age one can read one gets exposure to how English sounds.

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Even though the English spoken in Germany is not always up to par concerning pronunciation I have not to date met a professional that could not discuss a business subject in (almost)fluent English. Now the French are a whole different ball game concerning terrible English :rolleyes:

 

Now if the Germans would get off this oxford English crap they would be doing themselves(and everyone else) a huge favour. Sounds like they have a stick up...

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Even though the English spoken in Germany is not always up to par concerning pronunciation I have not to date met a professional that could not discuss a business subject in (almost)fluent English. Now the French are a whole different ball game concerning terrible English

 

Twenty-three years ago I would have agreed with you, but then Germany doubled in size with half the population only having Russian as a second language. It's only now becoming more the norm as "new generation" reunited Germans come into the business market. I still meet many older professionals, at least outside of academia in Berlin, in the east, and relatively new in the west that struggle with English.

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