The German phonetic alphabet (Funkalphabet)

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Übermut has been a lifesaver for me as I have an 'Ü' in my last name and to this day, I can't pronounce it very well. :ph34r:

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I had to call IT support recently to get a new password for my laptop's encryption software, and the support guy read me off a string of random numbers and characters (at least 50) using this alphabet -- would've been very handy to have this reference as I sometimes found it difficult to process which letter he meant quickly enough!

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I can't roll the 'r' like a German does, which leads to all kinds of confusion because my surname starts with that letter. I think this may be a solution!

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For some reason, I always thought it was "Adam" for A, what with Adam being the first man and all. And "Johann" for J. Anyway, I use those guys cos I've no idea who Anton and Julius are, and it always works fine. Good to know the names for Q and X though - I always get stuck on those two.

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In the interest of joining the world, Lets all use the standard international english Phonetic Alphabet (alpha, bravo, charlie, etc, ...) It used in Avation and Maritime navigation...

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I've no idea who Anton and Julius are,

Anton is aus Tirol and Julius is orange. :D

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"doppel-fow"

 

Never heard that before. "vay" for W, "fow" (as in fowl) for V

Me neither, is this new or have I been living under a rock this whole time?

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In the interest of joining the world, Lets all use the standard international english Phonetic Alphabet (alpha, bravo, charlie, etc, ...) It used in Avation and Maritime navigation...

A silly idea since letter sounds are pronounced differently in different languages.

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i've been here 10 years and of course speak german fluently enough but this first-letter bingo stuff still throws me, especially after i've been yakking on the phone for a while and all of a sudden they come out with emil and ludwig in rapid-fire succession. I find it jarring, all the more because if I were speaking english I wouldn't switch into Marine Mode and suddenly start spelling out foxtrot unicorn charlie etc etc.

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But others do. Since moving to England, I've had a number of people on the phone spell things out with "F as in Foxtrot". Normally not names, but random letters in a reference number. I'm actually considering using it, as these southerners often seem to have as much difficulty spelling out my last name as the Germans did.

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"Dann schicken Sie mir das Paket doch einfach zu"

"OK, wohin genau?"

"An die Firma Dangaard. Ich buchstabiere ..."

:lol:

post-1812-1182177748_thumb.jpg

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In the interest of international standards and worldwide common useage, Let's use the International Phoentic Alphabet, which is the proper Alpha, Beta, Charlie, Delta, ... used in international Avation, Navagation, and Telcoms.

 

A few more things thant need to be standardized. An Engineer looks at the international world. My One Shoe Size plan for World Peace.

 

Everyone could speak the same second language.

Everyone drive on the same side of the road.

Everyone use the metric system.

Everyone could use the same voltage and frequency.

Everyone could use the same plugs and pinouts.

Everyone could use the same paper sizes.

Everyone could use the same shoe sizes. Yes, Look in your shoe, there are four of them.

Same for clothing sizes.

Same date format of dd/mm/yyyy.

Same currency.

Same telephone number format.

Same address format.

 

There are probably many more things and could be made international, but lets start with the proper phoenetic alphabet. Oscar, Kilo? (OK?)

 

On a second note, what about the umlauts? Solution, use the proper phonetic alphabet plus the additional umlauts. Easly

 

When the German technical support starts ratteling their obsolete funkalphabet at me I just repeat it back to them in the proper phoenetic alphabet. Germany used a beautiful but unreadable Gothic script/font up unitl 1940.

 

...

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In the interest of international standards and worldwide common useage, Let's use the International Phoentic Alphabet, which is the proper Alpha, Beta, Charlie, Delta, ... used in international Avation, Navagation, and Telcoms.

Bollocks!

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By the way, if any of you visit east London, you should use this version:

 

A for Horses

B for Mutton

C for Miles

D for Kate

E for Brick

F for Lump

G for Police

H for Consent

I for Novello

J for Nice Time

K for Restaurant

L for Leather

M for Cream

N for Lope

O for the Rainbow

P for Relief

Q for the Loos

R for Mo

S for you (you can take it in the other room)

T for Gums

U for Me

V for Espana

W for a Quid, guvnor?

X for Breakfast

Y for Mistress

Zee for Moiles (works best in Somerset)

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