To the Australians: Why are you here in Germany?

191 posts in this topic

And may I ask at what cost to the environment? Have you seen or heard of the state of China´s (not just China either) environment?

 

Wow this post really has stirred up alot of emotions!! I think everwhere has it´s positives and negatives, it´s up to the individual!! No one can ever say or compare other countries, because every where is unique in it´s own way...that´s why we travel, work or live abroad..thats the best thing about living!!

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Shanghai has a Blade Runner like haze, so??? Money talks and everything else will walk. Ask your leader John Howard, he totally flipped when Condoleeza Rice said that China's economic progress must be contained.

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Australia's once white policy is going to be Asian only real soon. About ten percent of Muslims worldwide subscribe to extremist ideology( Kill all White people etc.) so there are 27 million potential suicide bombers living just North of Darwin.

You're talking out of your ass and you're taking this thread off topic. Quit it.

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I lived in Munich for five years but have been back in Oz for almost four. Since then, I have managed to find excuses to revisit Europe for a few reasons.

 

The type of people, for one. I made so many genuine friends from so many different countries whilst living in Europe. People are also so much more open (as stated in the forum). In Germany, I not only had female friends but male friends who had partners and I could happily hang out with those male, attached friends on their own, without their other halves feeling jealous. A couple of years ago I went out and had a drink and a chat with a German guy who had just moved to Aussie (he had an Aussie girlfriend who knew about our rendezvous). When he got home after our meetup, he found a note from her saying that she had left him(they sorted it out later). But she didn't understand his homesickness and his need to mix with others who he had something in common with (ie: lots of stuff relating to Germany). This kind of thing happens a lot here, i have found.

 

When I moved back to Australia I spent my first few years on the Gold Coast-chalk and cheese when compared with Munich. The majority of "Gold Coastians" in my opinion, are uncultured bogans or superficial and extremely insular. If you mention that you know a few European languages and have travelled throughout Europe, more than likely you will watch as their eyes glaze over signifying boredom and disinterest. That's because they are so caught up in their little worlds and many have never stepped foot outside the state let alone the country! And as mentioned in the forum, only talk about their cars and the footy. After three years on the Gold Coast I managed to make friends - with a couple who had just emmigrated from the UK - go figure!

 

I have recently moved to Brisbane and find a more interesting calibre of people here (you still get the bogans and ferals) but still long for the wonderful friendships and fun lifestyle I had in Germany.

 

Another thing is the "al fresco culture" of Europe. Europeans don't need much of an excuse to sit for hours chatting with their friends at an outdoor cafe-especially when that spring sun comes out- and enjoying the moment. Also, another BIG difference is the attitude to dining in Europe. Most (esp the Italians and French) see dining as an event. Here in Australia, many Aussies scoff down their food as if they are trying to break a world record. Diners got out to dinner between 6-8 and are well and truly out of the restaurant by 10 (the restaurant closing its doors soonafter, it seems). I miss the wining and dining and experiencing the finer things of life in Europe. All of that is commonplace and right at your fingertips - especially in Munich. Make the most of your time in Munich, you will cherish and miss it when you get back to Australia (if you ever do!).

:rolleyes: Sigh...had better book my ticket back soon before I slit my wrists... :rolleyes:

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I am an American-Canadian dual national, I am planning to migrate to Australia this December, I am staying in Germany from May until December, just wanted to see what life is like in Europe for a brief time. Honestly, I seriously doubt Indonesia would ever attack Australia, China along with India will stablize Asia including places like Indonesia over the coming decades. China, India, and the US have made substantial investments in Indonesia, and despite its large Muslim population Islamic extremism there is nothing like in Arab countries or Iran. China has major investments all over the Pacific region including Australia, so they would never allow Indonesia to start up trouble, anyway Indonesia is too wrapped up in its own problems. A more likely problem is that Australia could get flooded with illegal immigrants from Indonesia, like Mexicans in the USA.

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I think Australia is similar to Israel in some ways, except Israel is a much stronger and more resourceful country(my family is from Israel :)). We have a high tech nuclear equipped Army that could pretty much decimate Europe and the Middle East, Australia has a weak military and the biggest proof is in how its politicians behave towards corrupt Asian dictators. Mahathir Bin Mohmmed, Malaysian Jew Hater, was interviewed on Australian television and I could not believe how the Australian woman who interviewed him behaved towards this Anti-Semitic prick. Anyway threaten Israel and you might as well expect nuclear war, threaten Australia and no one gives a shit.

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I'm from Australia and after being back there recently for a holiday I can say that I'm struggling to find anything that is better in Australia than in Germany.

 

It is so dry over there at the moment that you're not even allowed to use water outside the house or shower for longer than 3 minutes. You can't wash your car, or water the garden. As such everything is brown and dying. In Germany we get proper seasons, which I wouldn't trade for anything.

 

Interesting flora/fauna/wildlife is something that you get over very quickly, I can assure you. I'm not sure what you mean about great sporting opportunities but in Munich we're close to the Alps which opens up a lot of possibilities. You can partake in any sport you want in Germany, so I'm not sure I understand your point.

 

You're right about the beaches, but here we have the Alps, and I wouldn't trade them for the beach. If you want to go to the beach, you can get a cheap flight to Spain, or even drive to Italy in around 4 hours from Munich. If you live in the north of Germany, there are some really nice beaches up there. Not as good as in Australia thats for sure, but beaches none the less.

 

I can't see myself ever going back to Australia. The advantages of Germany/Europe are too great. Advantages that I see over here are:

 

* Being so close to other countries/cultures. Australia is so isolated that you have to get on a plane for 10 hours to get anywhere interesting

* Nice, compact historical cities. Australian cities, in which 90% of the population live, are sprawling and busy. There is virtually no public transport and people have to drive everywhere

* Wide open spaces on your doorstep. Yes, thats right. Its easier here in Germany to get into the countryside than for the majority of Australians. Most people in Australia live in the suburbs, which are surrounded by more suburbs. My parents live 45 minutes drive from Brisbane city, and on the drive in all you see are suburbs. You have to drive a long way from Brisbane city itself before you see any country side. Here in Munich there is farmland literally 10 minutes from town.

* Cost of living compared with wages. I don't know about for other fields, but I earn much more here than I could in Australia. Cost of living in Australia is now about the same as over here.

* Like I mentioned, the weather over here in my opinion is infinitely better. The weather in Brisbane is almost the same all year around - dry and hot. You might think that sounds good, but it gets very boring after a while. Some people like it that way - fair enough, but I don't.

* Proper mountains and proper beer

* Lack of bogans. Australia is really full of them - I put it down to the isolation of the place. I know a number of people over there that couldn't tell you where Europe or America is on the map. They are nice enough people, but there is only so much conversation you can have about utes, fishing and bundaberg rum. People in Europe are generally more worldly.

I am currently in Australia and am looking to come back to Germany. Most people think I'm crazy but I'm not into beaches and prefer/miss all the things Hutco B) mentions. Don't get me wrong I don't hate it here and I love the people but it's not enough. While there are things that bugged me about Germany (including the fact its difficult for me to get work...) I still prefer it to here. Just one question... is the beer still as good? :D

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Israelis rely on intelligence to thrive while Australians rely on dumb luck, despite that some of the most notable people in Australia just happen to be Jewish. Israelis practically own half of Bondi.

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InvestorClass QUIT it you are speaking crap!!! You don´t have a clue what is going on in Aus..I bet your relying on crap journalism from CNN for your resources...get your facts right before you open your mouth!!!

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DO I HAVE TO REPEAT MYSELF AGAIN PEOPLE? :unsure:

I´M SORRY BUT IT´S WRONG TO SAY THAT ANY COUNTRY OR CITY IS PERFECT TO LIVE IN..DON´T GO THINKING THEY´RE NO YOBBO´S OR BOGAN´S HERE BECAUSE TRUST ME THERE ARE! The grass is never greener on the other side and there is no bed of roses!

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Sooo, back on topic...

 

I originally moved over to Germany first of all to get away from big city life in Melbourne and live in a tiny little nook in Sauerland called Arnsberg. Beautiful place, and was very peaceful, friendly people on the whole, and countryside out of this world. Anyway, i was back and forth from Melbourne-Arnsberg, then Melbourne-Bonn, then evenually Melbourne-Munich, where I lived amongst you fine individuals for the better part of 2 years. Loved it in Munich, to me it was a colder, smaller and 'shorter' Melbourne. I could have lived there for years, decent job pending (not to mention a few more oxford scholars in my sky rocket...)..

 

I found myself not homesick, but wanting to come back to Melbourne for the simple things in life. Friendly people is a huge thing - you could rarely, if ever, walk down the street anywhere in Munich and nod your head or give a quick 'hello' to a stranger walking towards you. I don;t think, anyway. You spend an extra 10 minutes in shops here in Melbourne, city or suburbs, because you;re talking football with the shopkeeper. I'm a beach person, yes, and though I live on the beach here, you drive roughly the same distance from Munich to the Alps from Melbourne and you hit the dividing range/goldfields. Seems also that Melbourne has that perfect link between big city life and small town life.

 

I know it shouldn't be a battle between cities, rather countries, but its just an example to get the thread back on topic.

 

Loved Munich/Germany, still do, but Melbourne/Australia in my opinion is more open, less rushy (Sydney excepted) and offers just about everything in terms of culture and scenery.

 

Cheaper too...!

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DO I HAVE TO REPEAT MYSELF AGAIN PEOPLE?

I´M SORRY BUT IT´S WRONG TO SAY THAT ANY COUNTRY OR CITY IS PERFECT TO LIVE IN..

No one is saying that Germany/Munich is perfect. They are listing reasons why they find one place better than the other. There is nothing wrong with that.

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Sooo, back on topic...

 

I originally moved over to Germany first of all to get away from big city life in Melbourne and live in a tiny little nook in Sauerland called Arnsberg. Beautiful place, and was very peaceful, friendly people on the whole, and countryside out of this world. Anyway, i was back and forth from Melbourne-Arnsberg, then Melbourne-Bonn, then evenually Melbourne-Munich, where I lived amongst you fine individuals for the better part of 2 years. Loved it in Munich, to me it was a colder, smaller and 'shorter' Melbourne. I could have lived there for years, decent job pending (not to mention a few more oxford scholars in my sky rocket...)..

 

I found myself not homesick, but wanting to come back to Melbourne for the simple things in life. Friendly people is a huge thing - you could rarely, if ever, walk down the street anywhere in Munich and nod your head or give a quick 'hello' to a stranger walking towards you. I don;t think, anyway. You spend an extra 10 minutes in shops here in Melbourne, city or suburbs, because you;re talking football with the shopkeeper. I'm a beach person, yes, and though I live on the beach here, you drive roughly the same distance from Munich to the Alps from Melbourne and you hit the dividing range/goldfields. Seems also that Melbourne has that perfect link between big city life and small town life.

 

I know it shouldn't be a battle between cities, rather countries, but its just an example to get the thread back on topic.

 

Loved Munich/Germany, still do, but Melbourne/Australia in my opinion is more open, less rushy (Sydney excepted) and offers just about everything in terms of culture and scenery.

 

Cheaper too...!

Mightypies love your attitude!! Munich is a lovely city..has a lot to offer...but Melbourne is still my home...Degraves lane, Brunswick street, great ocean road, yarra valley...love it all..and i loved been able to have a place in Hawthorn East...now I have just got accept that I will be living in a tiny expensive apartment in Munich until I win lotto, and take advantages of the beautiful resouces that Munich has to offer like the English Garden, the Isar and the old beautiful architecture... But needing some more stocks on Vegemite and Tim Tams :D

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In Germany, I not only had female friends but male friends who had partners and I could happily hang out with those male, attached friends on their own, without their other halves feeling jealous. A couple of years ago I went out and had a drink and a chat with a German guy who had just moved to Aussie (he had an Aussie girlfriend who knew about our rendezvous). When he got home after our meetup, he found a note from her saying that she had left him(they sorted it out later). But she didn't understand his homesickness and his need to mix with others who he had something in common with (ie: lots of stuff relating to Germany). This kind of thing happens a lot here, i have found.

An Australian friend of mine in Sydney went out with a German girl and she did not understand that he still kept in touch with his Ex and that they were still meeting up for coffee. So I guess what you just said also applies the other way around. It's about what a person will tolerate on an individual basis and nothing more.

 

When I moved back to Australia I spent my first few years on the Gold Coast-chalk and cheese when compared with Munich. The majority of "Gold Coastians" in my opinion, are uncultured bogans or superficial and extremely insular. If you mention that you know a few European languages and have travelled throughout Europe, more than likely you will watch as their eyes glaze over signifying boredom and disinterest. That's because they are so caught up in their little worlds and many have never stepped foot outside the state let alone the country! And as mentioned in the forum, only talk about their cars and the footy. After three years on the Gold Coast I managed to make friends - with a couple who had just emmigrated from the UK - go figure!

I have recently moved to Brisbane and find a more interesting calibre of people here (you still get the bogans and ferals) but still long for the wonderful friendships and fun lifestyle I had in Germany.

And as for 2 cities being cheese and chalk, you'll probably find that this applies to the majority of cities around the world if you were to compare them to each other. To be honest, you get "bogans and ferals" in every country. Germany is the 5th country that I've lived in throughout my life and I can tell you that I've met "uncultured, superficial and insular" people in all 5 countries. But they tend to be in the minority compared to all the other people that I've met.

 

Another thing is the "al fresco culture" of Europe. Europeans don't need much of an excuse to sit for hours chatting with their friends at an outdoor cafe-especially when that spring sun comes out- and enjoying the moment. Also, another BIG difference is the attitude to dining in Europe. Most (esp the Italians and French) see dining as an event. Here in Australia, many Aussies scoff down their food as if they are trying to break a world record. Diners got out to dinner between 6-8 and are well and truly out of the restaurant by 10 (the restaurant closing its doors soonafter, it seems). I miss the wining and dining and experiencing the finer things of life in Europe. All of that is commonplace and right at your fingertips - especially in Munich. Make the most of your time in Munich, you will cherish and miss it when you get back to Australia (if you ever do!).

Sigh...had better book my ticket back soon before I slit my wrists...

And here's yet another point which I disagree with. I come from Sydney and I can tell you that wining and dining is one of the most enjoyable things that I used to do while living there. And hanging out with friends whether having coffee on a terrace somewhere or just going over to their place for dinner, brunch etc... I really believe that it's a matter of finding people with the same interests as you, no matter what country you live in. I've met people in London who said they could not afford to go out to diner and yet spent 30 quids on beer at the pub and then after closing time got a take-out curry or a Doner Kebab. It's not about the country but the people that you have met and it is unfair to make a generalised opinion based on those few you have met.

I love Sydney and I love Munich. In my perfect world, Australia would only be 4 hours away from Europe rather than 24 hours. :(

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I loved been able to have a place in Hawthorn East...now I have just got accept that I will be living in a tiny expensive apartment in Munich until I win lotto

Ok, I don't know this area well, but out of interest I did a search to see prices in Hawthorn East. It doesn't look all that much cheaper than Munich to be honest. For example, this is $2million (€1.21 million) for a 3 bed/2 bathroom townhouse. House prices in Australia now pretty expensive, and if you compare like to like (Munich to Sydney for example), I don't think you'll find all that much difference.

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In my perfect world, Australia would only be 4 hours away from Europe rather than 24 hours.

I share your sentiments.

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It's funny, because from reading this, EAnnR it kinda sounds like you say "the grass is never greener on the other side etc. etc." only when people state opinions based on their personal preference which goes against yours...however from the sound of your comments it does sound as though you do believe that the grass is greener, back in Melbourne... I think it's perfectly natural for everyone to have preferences and although you are right in saying that the grass is never greener and everyone logically knows that, people still tend to see things in idealist ways when leaving a home behind or when they have found something which really matches what they love, i.e. for some people that is Germany or a particular city in Germany and not Oz, for you perhaps it is the other way around (as for many others). It is a very personal thing. My cousins grew up in the suburbs of Brisbane (Eight Mile Plains) and whilst 1 of them stayed there all his life and hasn't left except for to travel, the other left at 19 to move to Germany and hasn't moved back since (this is now about 10 years ago), he misses it, of course - but something is keeping him here whereas something else is keeping my other cousin over there.

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Maybe I should say that I'm English (just to stir things up a little! :P ) and I still prefer the life in Germany. It reminds me of England about 20 years ago in a good way. I've lived in Bremen, Hamburg and Munich. I'm in Melbourne at the moment and don't find it stimulating or a 'smaller Munich' at all. But each to their own. Things are also pretty expensive here compared to other places I've lived. Yes if you want to live in Munich/London its expensive but outside of that seriously it's not that different.

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I share your sentiments.

i share your sentiments on sharing the sentiments of kimf. I keep telling myself that in a year or two I might try the six months Australia six months Munich option. Germany's ( and Europe's) biggest downside is the weather. Would love to avoid the long winters here

 

Neither is better or worse. I think most "thinking" people here, be they from Germany, Australia, the UK, the US, Italy, Timbuktu, would like to take all the elements from different lands and construct their one perfect place. There is no perfect place there are only perfect fleeting moments and they are had all over the world.

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