Climate change

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"The Scandinavian way to zero-carbon construction.

 

Cities like Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen are working to clean up one of the world's most high-emission industries."

 

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Quiet, clean and green are not words you would typically use to describe a construction site. But the site at Olav Vs gate, one of the busiest streets in the heart of Norway's capital city, Oslo, was special. In a first of its kind in the world, all the machinery used on site – excavators, diggers and loaders – were electric.

 

Work began on the site in September 2019, converting what was once a hectic turning zone for the city's taxis into a new pedestrianised area. Locals may have initially raised eyebrows at what appeared to be just another inconvenient construction site, but soon it was clear there something very different about it. In fact, this was a pilot project for the first zero-emission urban construction site in the world.

 

"When I visited the zero-emission construction site I was extremely impressed," says Mark Preston Aragonès, a policy advisor at environmental non-profit Bellona. "I was looking at these big excavators that you generally associate with fumes and noise and general annoyances, but on this site, when the operator turned it on you couldn't tell the difference between when it was on or off. It was really impressive to see such big machines make such little noise."

 

Using electric equipment in place of traditional diesel engines meant that everyone in the vicinity noticed a reduction in ambient noise and pollution. "We observed shops keeping their doors open towards the street, even when construction work was going on just outside on the pavement," says Philip Mortensen, a senior adviser at the City of Oslo's Climate Agency. "The workers also reported much better communication on site due to lower noise levels, and that as a consequence the working environment felt safer."

...

Norway has the rare benefit of an electricity grid with 98% renewable energy, most from hydropower, which makes Norway an ideal testing ground for zero-emission sites

 

More here: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210622-the-scandinavian-way-to-zero-carbon-construction

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My sisters in Tacoma WA are suffering and no one in the family group up there has A/C; my grandniece is cooking her meals out of doors - in the shade, of course; another relative is jumping through hoops to keep her daughter's gerbil alive. The critter fades away in temps over 22C, so it's in a shaded room with a damp towel over its cage, a wrapped frozen ice pack inside the cage, and a fan several feet away to keep the air moving without causing a draft. A digital oven thermometer is monitoring the temp, which keeps nudging 21C. In its natural habitat - Mongolia - it would burrow underground to keep cool.

The projected temp for today was 111F, but that's been lowered to 106F. That's still damned hot. 

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shit.  I hope my granny's OK.  That's dangerous-to-the-elderly kind of heat.  (Though I don't like to think of my granny as "elderly," after all, she is only 85.)

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2 hours ago, katheliz said:

My sisters in Tacoma WA are suffering and no one in the family group up there has A/C

 

When I lived in Canada they encouraged people to go to the mall during the heatwave to cool down.

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28 minutes ago, LeonG said:

When I lived in Canada they encouraged people to go to the mall during the heatwave to cool down.

Ah, that's why Dubai has more than 50 malls. Now, I understand.

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1 minute ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Ah, that's why Dubai has more than 50 malls. Now, I understand.

 

And in Canada in the winter, you can go there to warm up too :)

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15 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Ah, that's why Dubai has more than 50 malls. Now, I understand.

Hahaha. These days everyone in the Middle East has A/C, this is why heat is actually way more bearable in summer than in Europe. 

 

On the other hand, this is good advice from the point of view of reducing total energy consumption. Working from home during pandemic reduced pollution from commute but increased electricity consumption drastically. 1 office a/c is much better than thousands of home a/c-s. 

 

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Canada weather: Dozens dead as heatwave shatters records

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Dozens of people have died in Canada amid an unprecedented heatwave that has smashed temperature records.

 

Police in the Vancouver area have responded to more than 130 sudden deaths since Friday. Most were elderly or had underlying health conditions, with heat often a contributing factor.

 

Canada broke its temperature record for a third straight day on Tuesday, 49.5°C (121°F) in Lytton, British Columbia.

 

The US north-west has also seen record highs - and a number of fatalities.

 

Experts say climate change is expected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events, such as heatwaves. However, linking any single event to global warming is complicated.

 

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The Arctic Circle Reached 48°C On The First Day Of Summer

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Temperatures in the Arctic Circle reached 48°C (118.4°F) during the longest day of the year last week, as scientists warn the region is only set to get hotter this summer.

 

The ground temperature was recorded in Russia’s Arctic Siberia, exactly one year to the day after the region broke the record for the hottest air temperature recorded in the Arctic Circle.

 

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will melt permafrost
will release CH4
will rise temperature


will melt permafrost ...

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Europe should get ready for the Middle Eastern climate. 

 

Here is what you should expect:

1. No rivers in summer, only in winter they are getting filled with rainwater. 

Advantage: you can hike along the river basin. 

 

2. No need for car winter tires anymore.

 

3. Not enough freshwater, so seawater is getting desalinated to compensate for that. As a result, the salt concentration in the ocean will drastically increase, so all seas and oceans will gradually convert to the Dead Sea (btw, it will be completely dry by then). 

 

 4. The dream of every child will be to see the snow at least once in a lifetime. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, yourkeau said:

1. No rivers in summer, only in winter they are getting filled with rainwater. 

Advantage: you can hike along the river basin. 

Disadvantage:
No cooling water for atomic power plants

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So there are more fires in the Amazon this year than 2020. A rise of 2.6%.
https://www.zeit.de/wissen/2021-07/amazonas-gebiet-waldbraende-brasilien-regenwald-rekordhoch-juni-2007

Worst fire June since 2007. Parts of the Amazon are already a source of CO2, not a sink.

Due to chopping, farming.
Oh no no no.
The Canadian prime minster recently said something like,

'we want to become the world's leader in CO2 reduction' -

while they are happily burning oil sand to cook oil out of oil sand.
Oh no no no
The Germans build new more efficient coal fired power plants and when it comes to taking

coal fired power plants off the grid the new ones are first -

due to some legislative twerks that make this more profitable.
Oh no no no
The German car industry builds ever bigger, stronger cars, because there customers want than,

but most of all because they make more profit per unit doing so.
Creating unnecessary demand is part of economics -

it doesn't matter for them whether they need more commodities per unit,

or whether we'll need more windmills to charge them.

The first and the latter lead to more CO2 output.
Oh no no no
For the small sport club TSV Klein-Berkel-Wangelist a dream comes true.
Now after 13 years of planning they build a artificial turf pitch.

Turning a small patch of nature into a desert.

They do not care about the damage they do with their dream.

The production of artificial grass, the destruction of a CO2 sink.

It will give them an advantage against the other small clubs.

Guess what the others will do.
BTW of course the German government helps out with some money.
https://www.tsv-kleinberkel-wangelist.de/kunstrasenplatz-baubeginn-26-05-21/
Oh no no no


Meanwhile people in the south US consider to move to cooler places,
say Duluth, MN. They will need housing. Guess what.

I don't want to paint the future black. This an unnecessary effort.
Just another CO2 source.

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On 7/1/2021, 4:32:26, ooch said:

Disadvantage:
No cooling water for atomic power plants

This is less of a problem, one can use dry cooling. Water for drinking and agriculture supply is the major problem. 

 

P.S. It is now much hotter in southern Canada than in Israel. 

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Yes, once one is thirsty nothing else matters.

 

I was thinking of the mayhem.

I was thinking of existing ones.

'Ecologists warned yesterday that the ecosystems in France's rivers were at grave risk after the government's decision to relax environmental regulations governing the operation of nuclear stations in an attempt to avert power cuts caused by the heatwave.
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2003/aug/13/france.internationalnews
And will it be worth $$$  that?

Dry Cooling

...
'Dry cooling involves much greater cost for the cooling set-up and is less efficient than wet cooling towers that use the physics of evaporation. Large fans consume much power, and cooling solely by heat transfer is relatively inefficient.(9)'

https://world-nuclear.org/our-association/publications/position-statements/cooling-of-power-plants.aspx

 

 

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"Climate change: Planting extra trees will boost rainfall across Europe"

 

 

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Planting extra trees to combat climate change across Europe could also increase rainfall, research suggests.

 

A new study found that converting agricultural land to forest would boost summer rains by 7.6% on average.

 

The researchers also found that adding trees changed rainfall patterns far downwind of the new forests.

 

The authors believe that extra rain could partially offset the rise in dry conditions expected with climate change.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-57722879

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