Climate change

2,141 posts in this topic

18 minutes ago, john_b said:

My advice: go outside, talk a walk and get some fresh air聽馃ぁ

Excellent.聽 馃憤

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I did take a walk Saturday and look what I found:

150557021_420020312542126_10487727331014

Note an igloo is NOT proof that climate change isn't happening.

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Last week people were walking around in shorts and t-shirts, a short while ago it was snowing and some kids were having a snowball fight. It's also snowed over the last 2 nights. When I think back to my Easter holidays from school, it was always warm and sunny. Scouts bob-a-job week was always during the Easter holidays.

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4 minutes ago, Wulfrun said:

聽When I think back to my Easter holidays from school, it was always warm and sunny.聽

Don't know where you were....

But in the 1980's my diving club always went to Brixham for Easter - the first diving of the year.

All dives kept to 15 minutes max due to temperature (but 15 mins is a qualifying dive).

Most time in the pub afterwards.

Easter in Brixham definately not "warm and sunny"

:o

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34 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

Don't know where you were...

It was back in the '60s, I was either at home in Birmingham or at my grandparents in Norfolk, which was sometimes quite chilly being on the east coast.

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Why is it so cold?

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Many parts of the UK and mainland Europe woke up to a frosty start this morning - with snow in some places.

As lockdown restrictions across the UK ease, people in England can now visit a pub or restaurant to sit outside, but will still need those winter layers for now.

BBC Weather presenter, Owain Wyn Evans, explains the April cold snap and whether things are going to warm up any time soon.

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Wait a minute. Are they fertilizing the vegetable gardens with HIV poop?

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The biogas digester also produces a slurry by-product that is used as an organic fertiliser on the small farm at the prison, which is helping to boost the production of vegetables. The hope is that this will reduce levels of malnutrition among inmates, particularly for those living with HIV.

Sounds strange.

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Bit of good news:

"Food giants respond to worries over packaging"

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When Rebecca Prince-Ruiz recalls how her eco-friendly movement Plastic Free July has progressed over the years, she can't help but smile. What began in 2011 as 40 people committing to going plastic-free one month a year has gained momentum to 326 million people pledging to adopt this practice today.

...

Since 2000, the plastics industry has manufactured as much plastic as all the preceding years combined, a World Wildlife Fund report in 2019 found. "The production of virgin plastic has increased 200-fold since 1950, and has grown at a rate of 4% a year since 2000," the report says.

This has spurred companies to replace single-use plastic with biodegradable and compostable packaging designed to dramatically reduce the toxic footprint plastics leave behind.

In March, Mars Wrigley and Danimer Scientific announced a new two-year partnership to develop compostable packaging for Skittles in the US, estimated to be on shelves by early 2022.

It involves a type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) that will look and feel the same as plastic, but can be thrown into the compost where it will break down, unlike regular plastic that takes anywhere from 20 to 450 years to fully decompose.

Danimer Scientific's polymer product is made from canola oil, and it acts similarly to wood, meaning it breaks down when bacteria interact with it. "PHA goes away naturally and is still a very strong material for all types of products," says Stephen Croskrey, chief executive of Danimer Scientific, based in the US state of Georgia.

Alastair Child, Mars Wrigley vice-president for global sustainability, says: "Our vision is to support a circular economy where packaging never becomes waste and by 2025 we plan to reduce our virgin plastic use by 25% and for 100% of our plastic packaging to be reusable, recyclable or compostable."

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56770732

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"Court orders Shell to slash CO2 emissions in landmark climate ruling"

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London (CNN Business)A Dutch court has ruled that Royal Dutch Shell must dramatically reduce its carbon emissions in a landmark climate decision that could have far reaching consequences for oil companies.

The company must slash its CO2 emissions by 45% by 2030 from 2019 levels, according to a judgment from a district court in The Hague on Wednesday. That includes emissions from its own operations and from the energy products it sells.


This is the first time that a court has ruled a company needs to reduce its emissions in line with global climate goals, according to Friends of the Earth Netherlands, an environmental campaigning group that brought the case against Shell (RDSA).


The verdict could pave the way for similar cases to be brought in other countries, holding oil companies liable for greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels.

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1 hour ago, Janx Spirit said:

The company must slash its CO2 emissions by 45% by 2030 from 2019 levels, according to a judgment from a district court in The Hague on Wednesday. That includes emissions from its own operations and from the energy products it sells.

How should they control the emissions of the products they sell? That麓s in the hands of their customers, isn麓t it?

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Shell will provide with each gas purchase a little biogradable paper message attached to your receipt saying: if you drive at a steady 80km/h on the freeway, you'll get way better gas mileage.

Planet saved!

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15 hours ago, silty1 said:

Shell will provide with each gas purchase a little biogradable paper message attached to your receipt saying: if you drive at a steady 80km/h on the freeway, you'll get way better gas mileage.

Planet saved!

Typical big oil tactic: put the burden of "change" to the consumer. Same shit with anti-beef stances.

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"French oil giant Total rebrands in shift to renewables"

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Oil and gas giant Total will be rebranded as TotalEnergies as it shifts some of its focus towards renewable energy sources.

Shareholders voted overwhelmingly in favour of the move and approved the firm's environmental goals.

"We want to become a sort of green energy major," said chief executive Patrick Pouyann茅.

Big energy firms are coming under increasing pressure to adjust to a lower-carbon world.

On Wednesday, a small hedge fund investor succeeded in ousting two board members at Exxon in the US, in a bid to alter the firm's direction on climate change.

And a court in the Netherlands ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its emissions more quickly than the Anglo-Dutch oil firm had planned.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57282008

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"Why it's the end of the road for petrol stations"

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The big worry for most people thinking about buying an electric car is how to charge the thing.

But the real question you should be asking is how you're going to refuel your petrol or diesel vehicle if you don't go electric.

That's because electric cars are going to send the petrol station business into a death spiral over the next two decades, making electric vehicles the default option for all car owners.

Why? Because charging electric vehicles is going to become much more straightforward than refuelling petrol and diesel cars.

This isn't just because the government has banned the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030.

Imagine we were going the other way, replacing electric cars with fossil fuel power.

You are writing the risk assessment for a new petrol station. You want to dig a big hole in the ground in the middle of town, put in some tanks and fill them up with an enormous amount of highly flammable fuel.

Then you're proposing to attach a really powerful pump and invite in random members of the public.

They'll arrive in vehicles with hot engines. You'll hand them the really powerful pump that sprays the highly flammable liquid.

Without any supervision they'll use it to transfer large quantities of the highly flammable liquid into their hot vehicle, they'll pay you and drive off.

Are you OK to sign off on that? Do you think Health and Safety will give it the green light?

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Electricity, by contrast, is pretty much everywhere already. Where's your car now? Do you think it might be near an electricity cable? Exactly.

The only challenge is how to bring that electricity a few feet to the surface so you can start getting it into your battery.

And you don't need to be Thomas Edison to work that out.

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If you live in a flat or a house without a drive, don't worry. The aim is to have an electric vehicle (EV) charging point at virtually every parking place.

Erik Fairbairn's electric vehicle recharging company, Pod Point, wants to be part of this effort to rewire the UK.

"You'll get to a point where you barely ever think about energy flowing into your car again," he predicts.

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the decline of the (oil) industry could come surprisingly quickly. Think about it. As electric vehicles begin to edge out petrol and diesel there will be less refuelling business to go around. Those service stations on the edge of viability will begin to go to the wall.

That'll make it that little bit harder for petrol and diesel drivers to find a service station to fill up in and the remaining operators may also feel the need to up their prices to maintain profits.

So, fewer and quite possibly more expensive petrol stations. Meanwhile it will be getting easier and easier to charge your electric car. What's more, as the market scales up, electric vehicles will become cheaper to buy.

You see where this is going: the more petrol stations close, the more likely we all are to go electric. In turn, more petrol stations will be forced to close. And so on.

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And don't worry about where the electricity to power all these new cars will come from.

The National Grid says it won't have a problem charging all the electric vehicles that are going to come onto our roads.

In fact, it isn't expecting much of an increase in demand, just 10% when everyone is driving electric.

That's because we drive much less than we tend to imagine. The average car journey is just 8.4 miles, according to the Department for Transport.

And, explains Isabelle Haigh, the head of national control for the National Grid, there is already quite a lot of spare capacity built into the system.

More聽https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57416829

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Outside temperature reached 32掳C today, it's currently 29掳C in my apartment, my fridge is struggling to stay cool.

At least the beer is cool enough to drink...

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