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Czech / German border, a cultural no man's land

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On 7/23/2021, 10:09:16, Fietsrad said:

I imagine the comments from more than a dozen years ago are no longer valid, Czechia has caught up, even overtaken some places in the BRD.

 

But what about Poland? I hope to do some day trips there soon.

 

My experience is with the Czech areas bordering Saxony, not the Wessi-expat Bayern perspective.  :-) 

I think things have changed a lot in Czech Republic since 2004.  Yes, there are still junk shops along the border and there is still some gas & cigarette tourism from Germany, but everything is more pleasant and civilized than it was in 2004. 

 

As to the Polish border, Zgorzelec across from Görlitz still looks like East Germany but I don't feel any sense of chaos or poverty the way the OP described the Czech border in 2004. 

 

Bad Muskau and Leknica on the other side of the border: strikes me as different than the Czech border towns.  Leknica had a huge market for years catering to Germans after the Wende, it caused traffic trouble for tiny Bad Muskau for years.  Even now there is still a "Polenmarkt" catering to German day shoppers. Unlike what I have seen in Czech Republic (dominated by ethnic Vietnamese selling cigarettes, soda, knives, trinkets) the Leknica offerings include Poles selling fruit and baked goods - and a scary maze of containers dominated by ethnic Romanians selling all sorts of stuff.  That container market is a bit dodgy in broad daylight on a summer afternoon. 

 

 

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Roads and pavements look in excellent nick. No potholes or uneven surfaces - often an indicator of the state of a country's infrastructure.

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The best thing about living in Bavaria is how different one town is from the other and being able to explore Thuringia/Saxony/Hesse, the Czech Republic or Austria, depending where you're living. Bavaria itself is very varied, for example in some of its towns the buildings are made of stone, in others the regular painted brick, yet others have half-timbered houses like Forchheim (which is close to Nuremberg).

 

If you live near the Czech border, further east in the Czech Republic you get lovely Stribro link or link with its medieval bridge and nice mayor house and further south-east there is the fairy-tale-like Klatovy that looks like this (sorry for stock photo):611522639bf6f_47946157-black-tower-and-t

 

The best thing living close to a national border is being able to enjoy more than one culture and architecture styles. I don't understand people who do not explore, there are Americans who commute every day the same distance as from Nuremberg to Pilsen and I had a lady tell me it's too far to commute with a car from Amberg to Nuremberg, really? It takes more time to drive to go to work within Sofia and country roads along fields/villages > city driving any day. Even so, there's no excuse for ppl living in e.g. Nuremberg not exploring at least once a month the other towns/cities in the area.

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