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Conspiracy theorists

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Rh-negative women and men have several "Unusual Traits" that Rh-positives don't:

 

* An EXTRA-Vertebra (a "Tail Bone")...some are born with a tail (called a "Cauda"). CAUDA EQUINA - The bundle of spinal nerve roots arising from the end of the spinal cord and filling the lower part of the spinal canal(from approximately the thoraco-lumbar junction down). Embryology : Caudally the tail region projects over the cloacal membrane.

* Lower than normal Body Temperature
* Lower than normal Blood Pressure
* Higher mental analytical abilities.
* Higher Negative-ion shielding (from positive "charged" virus/bacteria)around the body.
* High Sensitivity to EM and ELF Fields.
* Hyper Vision and other senses.

 

Another salient genetic feature is the the shape and sutures (bone joints) of cranial bones of Basques [The skull ridge].

 

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2 hours ago, jeremytwo said:

 

 

This is the original post; (my bold)

 

Sometimes I wish I had studied psychiatry. There is obviously a common theme among those who need to believe in outlandish and impossibly complex theories to explain otherwise straightforward events. The thing that really astounds me is that these people do not appear to have learning disabilities nor do they exhibit other signs of retardation, and yet they would rather believe that dozens or hundreds of coincidences all occurred simultaneously rather than accept far simpler explanations.

 

I bet they get that same feeling I do when I buy a lottery ticket when there's a huge jackpot: I just know deep down that I'm going to win, despite the fact that I'm more likely to be run over truck in my living room while waiting for the number drawing.

 

Obviously this is an exact science, and Trump is Rh Negative.

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Interesting article. Now what about the theorists themselves - the people who make them up? Why? I understand that is often for political gain but not always.

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46 minutes ago, onemark said:

See this link for an explanation as to why some people believe in conspiracy theories:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/talking-apes/201801/why-do-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories .

 

 

The desire to maintain a positive self-image:

Research shows that people who feel socially marginalized are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories. We all have a desire to maintain a positive self-image, which usually comes from the roles we play in life—our jobs and our relationships with family and friends. When we know we make a positive difference in the lives of others—as parent, spouse, friend, teacher or mentor—we see our own lives as worthwhile, and we feel good about ourselves.

But say Uncle Joe is on disability and hasn’t worked in years. He feels socially excluded. However, he does have plenty of time to surf the internet for information about conspiracy theories, and he can chat online with others who hold similar beliefs. Thus, belief in conspiracy theories gives Uncle Joe a sense of community.

Furthermore, his research into conspiracy theories has given him a sense that he is the holder of privileged knowledge.

 

This all sounds so very familiar. Right down to the initial.

 

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@cybil and @jeremytwo   if you are interested in distribution of traits, check out the genetic tests offered by 23andme or various other providers.   

 

The blogs and article incorporated into the site are very interesting and look at your recent history as well as speculating about features you are carrying from thousands of years ago. 

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1 minute ago, balticus said:

the genetic tests offered by 23andme

 

I never understood why any sane people would voluntarily surrender the most private part of themselves, DNA, to be distributed over the internet. On the other hand, they are catching a lot of criminals because of the databases.

 

As for the conspiracy theory believers, my own son who I love more than anything was falling into that trap when he thought of himself as a big, fat failure. I am happy to say that he saw the light and now just likes to joke around about the zombie apocalypse. 

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Just now, fraufruit said:

I never understood why any sane people would voluntarily surrender the most private part of themselves, DNA, to be distributed over the internet. On the other hand, they are catching a lot of criminals because of the databases.

 

I would guess that within 10 years, a DNA sample will be taken at birth, just like a blood sample or as part of the vaccination process.    Many people in Iceland have submitted samples and it has helped in scientific research. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, balticus said:

@cybil and @jeremytwo   if you are interested in distribution of traits, check out the genetic tests offered by 23andme or various other providers.   

 

Froots answered that before i could.

 

1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

I never understood why any sane people would voluntarily surrender the most private part of themselves, DNA, to be distributed over the internet. On the other hand, they are catching a lot of criminals because of the databases.

 

The last thing I'd give away would be my DNA information to "researchers". I read recently that Watson (one half of the DNA discoverers) said that of the DNA nucleus, only 5% was taken as useful to science, the rest being deemed of no importance. Personally I find that dismissal of the 95% to be unusual. 

 

Back on topic. The label "conspiracy theorist" was immediately applied to anyone who questioned JFK's assassination. Surely in the case of one of the most tragic killings in the world to question the events leading up to that death and events thereafter is to me healthy. Anyone who accepts any government line on ánything needs their head examining. It was this blind acceptance which led to the Iraq War.

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1 hour ago, jeremytwo said:

The last thing I'd give away would be my DNA information to "researchers".

 

As with everything in life there are costs and benefits.  The benefits are mosty around geneology (family tree), genetic origins (hey Im x% chinese or whatever) and medical.  The costs are mostly around potential misuse by health insurance or you or relatives getting caught for your crimes.  

 

It isnt clear to me that its a good thing or a bad thing. you have to decide how interested you are in your genetics and whether you care that some companies have a dna profile.

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4 hours ago, jeremytwo said:

 

 Anyone who accepts any government line on ánything needs their head examining. It was this blind acceptance which led to the Iraq War.

 

Is there a "Sweeping statement of the year" thread? or just "Dumbest user"?

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1. People make up or adhere to conspiracy theories both for political gain and for the reasons in the article I cited above.

2. In this day and age I'd feel as happy to have my DNA recorded as I would my fingerprints - namely never. It's offensive.

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On 10.2.2019, 16:52:33, balticus said:

@cybil and @jeremytwo   if you are interested in distribution of traits, check out the genetic tests offered by 23andme or various other providers.   

 

The blogs and article incorporated into the site are very interesting and look at your recent history as well as speculating about features you are carrying from thousands of years ago. 

I ran across an online article, another conspiracy thing, that said Rh negative people are being monitored by the CIA and MI6 because of their supposed psychic abilities, etc. Oh no. It reminds me of that song by Michael Jackson 'Somebody's Watching Me.' Oh, maybe Michael was also Rh negative? :o Hahahaha. Oh no, I really had no idea how much hype surrounds Rh negative people. 

 

Enough. Wait, I think my cat might be an alien. Is there cat Rh negative and postive to go by? Hahahaha.

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, cybil said:

I ran across an online article, another conspiracy thing, that said Rh negative people are being monitored by the CIA and MI6 because of their supposed psychic abilities, etc. Oh no. It reminds me of that song by Michael Jackson 'Somebody's Watching Me.' Oh, maybe Michael was also Rh negative? :o Hahahaha. Oh no, I really had no idea how much hype surrounds Rh negative people. 

 

Enough. Wait, I think my cat might be an alien. Is there cat Rh negative and postive to go by? Hahahaha.

 

That's an entire can o'worms. The CIA and its counterpart did indulge in research to develop a "supersoldier" who could switch off and kill without problems, and hold intelligence inside even under torture. Thus the now declassified but failed MK Ultra programme which led to the invention of LSD. They did indeed undertake research in to the paranormal back then. I was listening to a podcast by a former News Intarnational (Murdoch media empire) News of the World Editor who claimed that many media figures in the UK were sent to the Priory for "counselling" better known as the notorious Tavistock Institute. The exact same exists in the US.

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On 09/02/2019, 20:18:48, cybil said:

...and France (I am at a loss to find an alien connection here, help me out people). 

 

 

Have you never noticed the similarity between the Eiffel Tower and a radio mast? Just who are they trying to contact with a mast that big?

 

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On 2/9/2019, 9:30:37, jeremytwo said:
3 hours ago, jeremytwo said:

 

That's an entire can o'worms. The CIA and its counterpart did indulge in research to develop a "supersoldier" who could switch off and kill without problems, and hold intelligence inside even under torture. Thus the now declassified but failed MK Ultra programme which led to the invention of LSD. They did indeed undertake research in to the paranormal back then. I was listening to a podcast by a former News Intarnational (Murdoch media empire) News of the World Editor who claimed that many media figures in the UK were sent to the Priory for "counselling" better known as the notorious Tavistock Institute. The exact same exists in the US.

 

 

Reminds me of this film,

 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099871/

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, jeremytwo said:

Thus the now declassified but failed MK Ultra programme which led to the invention of LSD.

 

As per your usual standard you've got the timeline bassackwards.

 

LSD was invented in 1938 by a Swiss chemist call Hofmann who first discovered its hallucintory effects in 1943.  The CIA did not exist at that time.

 

During the Korean War (1951 - 53) US POWs were believed to be subjected to brain-washing attempts by Korean, Chinese or Russian interrogators. Purportedly in a search for similar but more effective methods of extracting information from enemy captives and/or strengthening the resistance of US POWs to brain-washing tactics the director of the CIA approved the use of LSD in the MK Ultra programme. In 1953!

 

 

There was however already a high degree of paranoia within high level US political, military and intel communities since they were convinced that the only possible way the Soviet Union could have developed their own atomic weapon capability was due to Soviet moles having had access to US ULTRA SECRET (WWII classification) documents.

 

It is known that the military predecessor organization to the CIA, (you remeber the OSI in which George H. W. Bush played a key role), did recruit former Gestapo and SS interrogators immediately following the end of the war in Europe locating them at Uberrüssel near Frankfurt (formerly Luftwaffe Stalag D, renamed Camp King) and these interrogators who had already been experimenting with LSD for several months in 1944-45 continued to do so in 1945-47 using it on random US military, German and other displaced civilian subjects without their knowledge or consent.

 

Of course, as conspiracy theories go it's a perfect storm, with a handful of facts moved slightly out of their actual historical context and sprinkled with a significant bit of speculation, especially because it also involves several opportunities to mention the authoritarian right's favourite essential 'immoral' themes like the introduction of "sex, drugs and rock'n'roll!" and the "planned destruction of the US education system" (the 'British Invasion' of the early 1960s led by The Beatles and Rolling Stones being an Illuminati plot !! LOL!!) so it's no surprise that you bang this one out on your keyboard at every chance you get.

 

As for the supposed Tavistock Institute of Human Research connection well...

they may have been responsible for the design of the modern industrial HR recruiting, management personnel control and motivational systems (for which they may indeed deserve a deal of critisism), but that was unconnected to the well-known post-Tavistock Clinic activities of R.D. Laing at Glasgow University in the late '50s - early '70s.

 

In any case I doubt they'd have had any need to offer LSD, nor any other drugs, to any Skews of The World editor - their own reporters were constantly on the scene well ahead of the police!!

 

How dare you infer critisism of your beloved Murdoch media empire whose decrees you not only slavishly follow but promote unquestioningly at every opportunity???

 

DoubleDoofus!

 

2B

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1 hour ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

LSD was invented in 1938 by a Swiss chemist call Hofmann who first discovered its hallucintory effects in 1943.  The CIA did not exist at that time.

 

Indeed, but much of the content here is correct.

 

6 hours ago, jeremytwo said:

The CIA and its counterpart did indulge in research to develop a "supersoldier" who could switch off and kill without problems, and hold intelligence inside even under torture. Thus the now declassified but failed MK Ultra programme which led to the invention of LSD. They did indeed undertake research in to the paranormal back then.


Quite how seriously the Men in Black (for want of a better term) seriously looked at the paranormal I wouldnt want to argue, but there were programmes to do so. As I understand it with a budget into the billions, a couple of guys with tarot cards wasnt even noticable on the budget so they did some of that stuff just because the risk of the russians making it work and opening a magic gap (dont laugh) was too great when the costs were tiny.

 

Much of this stuff however isnt as conspiratorial as it might seem.  LSD as @2B_orNot2B pointed out was discovered innocuously enough and whilst has had some interesting uses wasnt much more than a chemical that happened to have some powerful effects.

 

Amphetamines were also used during WW2 to keep military awake, and indeed it is still widely reported (though I dont know if true) that us military pilots still routinely take amphetamines to stay awake.

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