Germans who think they speak perfect English

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Stanford, when you actually embrace the darkness and evil that is technical documentation then there is nothing that you will flinch from, bad translations won't even register on your moral compass.

 

Code on.

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Your English is pretty good - most people are lazy on forums and don't capitalise or punctuate properly, but you did ask ;)

Why is "If the Spanish ..., we would probably use Spanish ..." incorrect? Or did you think that "be using" more accurately conveys the meaning and both are grammatically correct?

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I'll never forget the discussion about 3 year's guarantee and the apostrophe...

Is the above correct, according to you?

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It's KRAUT.

Not to me it ain't. It's krout. Like snout and trout and not like taut. Always has been, always will be. I ain't bleedin' spelling it like what the krouts do.

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@ MichiS:

If the Spanish had come to Germany and occupied us... (no conditional form in the "if" clause).

And would be using is spot on (continuous form describing activity taking place at a specified point in time, i.e. now).

(Yes, there are exceptions to these rules, but let's keep things simple.)

 

And everyone knows that everything Don Riina says is right. Everything.

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And everyone knows that everything Don Riina says is right. Everything.

Glad the message is getting though. Quicker everyone learns that, the better.

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Quick on that one I might have been. I should have read the rest of the thread first before posting corrections that Kay posted hours and hours ago. Sorry.

Got something right, though.

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...the idea of committees of uninformed people spending, if not wasting, hours of company time discussing the finer details of what should be FILL IN YOUR JOB'S DECRIPTION HERE... and that said committee to boot being stacked with Germans with shaky grasps AND AGAIN HERE but never the less with an ego bigger than the Queen herself!!! ahhhhh

Stanford, welcome to the world of German Managment Structures...

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My German boss just informed me that 'jourfixe' is commonly used in English to mean 'regular appointment'. My thirty six years as a native speaker tells me he's incorrect, but he won't believe me. Who's right? Can I go and slap him for being an uninformed twat?

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Tell him he's wrong - if 'jourfixe' is used commonly in any language it would be French and not English. Never heard of it before arriving here either.

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gideon - if you do a search with 'jourfixe' you get three hits, two in German and one book re. something scientific in English. All in all, one result in English does not make a phrase 'commonly used'.

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I agree with Hams -- if it's used frequently in any language, then in French, not in English. My boss uses it, too, but until I started working for him, I'd never heard of it.

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I know some non germans who say that their German is perfect, and when I hear them speak I hear all sorts of errors, even though my German is far from perfect. I think it works the other way too.

Hmmm yes I find that too. You see my thing is that I am modest as well and always say my German is not that good (which I mean compared to a native it isn't). I am lucky as I have the accent pretty much sorted just lazy grammar habits let me down :(

 

 

In my experience it is not about believing you are fluent in another language it (what bugs) about how you will question or undermine a native speaker (on questions/points about their own language!). When I worked in a German company, they would ask us native speakers to correct their documents but when we changed stuff they would argue with us!!! Most of the time it was more to do with style than grammar...i.e. Germans writing in german style sentences that made document difficult if not impossible to read for a native reader!!!

Oh yes get that all the time to the extent where I now refuse to check work for people.

 

 

My German boss just informed me that 'jourfixe' is commonly used in English to mean 'regular appointment'. My thirty six years as a native speaker tells me he's incorrect, but he won't believe me. Who's right? Can I go and slap him for being an uninformed twat?

Would he believe google? My old boss always used to throw that at me!

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Don't argue with your bosses. Simply take them to a topless bar and get them loaded. After that take some photos of them in the bar acting all obnoxious and wasted. The next day your boss will agree to everything you say. :lol:

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