Why are you unhappy today?

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Another barbaric example of institutional, blind, box-crossing, unthinking procedure-following, inhumane failure.

 

How very, very sad for you White Rose. I feel (some of) your pain.

 

May your husband rest in peace.

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I'm sorry for your loss and stress, but I will take what might be the unpopular position and defend the first responders.  Having been an active law enforcement officer and regular first responder to life threatening events in the U.S., I have no doubt that their first reaction was to attempt to resuscitate or stabilize your husband if they did not know about the Patientverfügung.  They are not there to trot out all of their equipment and put on a show or try new techniques.  Without any information contrary to what they received when dispatched, their focus is on saving lives using all available tools, equipment, and training.  In most cases, time is not on the side of the patient, and the immediate appearance of death is not necessarily final, so don't blame the responders for doing their job.  I wasn't there, nor was I a party to the phone conversation, so I don't know what was said to the dispatcher or what was relayed by the dispatcher to the first responders.

 

I arrived at over a dozen 911 calls before the rescue squad or EMTs arrived, and my first duty is to the unresponsive person.  In only one call was I told about the Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order the patient had prior to arriving at the residence, and in two cases I learned about the DNR order after I arrived.  In each of these cases, I saw the DNR bracelet or pendant with the owner's name, so I was able to tell Dispatch to have the other responders slow their response.

 

The advice from @bramble is good and might help to prevent turning a stressful event into a nightmare.

 

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Deepest sympathies on your sad loss and the disturbing end. 

AS a RN, I can  see JG's well thought out point.  Without knowing to begin with if there is a DNR order, we are obliged to commence resuscitation   actions on an unresponsive person.  It is a distressing  procedure for family members to see this, and I can really empathise with the shock it causes.

Even in hospital,   a DNR order has to be clearly displayed and discussed with family and staff.

As JG said- the initial call  and the dispatcher's onward call may not have contained all info.

Bramble' suggestion is good, and  a med alert bracelet is wise.

I do hope your family and friends help to give you some comfort.

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I get it.

When Dear Relative passed away in the hospital with me present (a moving experience), the nurses came in and gently asked what to do even though there was a DNR statement. The professionals need to be careful.
In our case however, the question was swift but quiet.

 

All my respect to White Rose.

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12 minutes ago, Metall said:

I get it.

When Dear Relative passed away in the hospital with me present (a moving experience), the nurses came in and gently asked what to do even though there was a DNR statement. The professionals need to be careful.
In our case however, the question was swift but quiet.

 

All my respect to White Rose.

Yep.  Friends in similar in similar end of life situations had their devoted Hausarlzt involved. Not an ambulance..  Ambulance staff are ambulance staff.  They were not trying to be cruel, they were doing their thing.  Horrible for everyone all round.  

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8 hours ago, bramble said:

What a nightmare. You have my sympathy too. It's a warning to me to have copies of my Patientenverfügung displayed prominently on the inside of my front door - bedside table etc. Have to give it some thought. 

My HMO provided me with the equivalent form and said to print it on bright neon pink paper. I've put a copy in every room I'm likely to be found. People who live alone are especially recommended to have this form displayed for first responders - firemen, police, emergency medical technicians - and never to have it stored in a drawer or elsewhere. It has my signature, my doctor's signature, and my instructions for treatment.

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36 minutes ago, optimista said:

Couldn t they ask first ?

 

That type of information collection is not part of any first responder training that I know about and would only slow down the life-saving tasks.  It's the responsibility of the patient or the immediate family to ensure the emergency personnel have the relevant information they need to modify their response.  The same is true for any allergies or adverse reactions to medication. 

 

The first responders don't have the time or the obligation to interview bystanders when faced with an unconscious and unresponsive patient.  It's easy to dissect an incident second by second after the fact and propose alternate courses of action, and this helps keep some attorneys employed.

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Glad you got through it okay.

Now you have closure and the healing can begin.

My thoughts are with you.

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I got all tarted up for a business workshop this morning. I even combed my hair beforehand.

The destination: about 7 S -Bahn stops from Harburg, my area of Hamburg in the South. Start time of the workshop: 10 am.

Planned travel time:  about 30 minutes.

 

Got the ticket at my S-Bahn at 9 am, train came 7 minutes later and stopped after one station. " Because of track work, please all disembark and take the next train from the platform opposite."

 

So I waited about 25 minutes for the train and chatted to a woman who told me: " the train only goes to Hammerbrook anyway and then you have to get off and take a bus to the Hauptbahnof."

 

5 minutes later, I had had enough waiting.. A train came from the opposite direction and I took the one stop back to my local station.

 

It was now 10 o'clock.😟

The company phoned me a few minutes later. 

" I'm not coming. Too tiring and too late."

 

A reminder not to take the S-Bahn to the airport tomorrow with suitcase and dog. I'll probably not get there.  Taxi it is.

Cities are so tiring...

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On 9/1/2022, 11:46:28, john g. said:

 

 

It was now 10 o'clock.😟

The company phoned me a few minutes later. 

" I'm not coming. Too tiring and too late."

 

 

 

What was the seminar? you could have called me :)

 

yes, cities are tiring. 

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4 hours ago, tor said:

 

What was the seminar? you could have called me :)

 

yes, cities are tiring. 

You wouldn't have liked it😂

Insurance workshop! I wasn't THAT keen, either, one day before flying to Crete! Lovely at the beach today❤️

 

 

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Nicole had just finished feeding our three cats plus the homeless one abandoned by former neighbours last year. The latter cat jumped over the wall.

 

About five minutes later, I took Mandy out for a Pipirunde and found the dead body of the cat on the main road. It had just been run over. Instant death ( thank God ). At least it was a quick death.😟

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