Why are you unhappy today?

10,909 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, swimmer said:

Banging headache, nausea, diarrhoea (which at leasts beats the alternative) and all.  Quick to get over in the usual ways and a very good excuse to poop to the sauna, but I thought I was OK on recovery - far more dehydrating, perhaps?

Well, that was my first reading.  So glad you've decided on a more socially-acceptable solution.

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22 hours ago, swimmer said:

I recently switched swim to cold bath day and the swim is fine, but, my goodness, the next day hangover :wacko:.  I may as well drink half a bottle of scotch and lots of beer.   Banging headache, nausea, diarrhoea and all.  Quick to get over in the usual ways and a very good excuse to pop to the sauna, but I thought I was OK on recovery - far more dehydrating, perhaps?

 

If you are not aware of other reasons, such as a change in your routine liquid intake:output ratio, to justify considering dehydration as a potential cause I would be more inclined to suspect circulatory changes to be the reason for your discomfort.

 

Unless a person is in continuing training so that their circulatory system is able to cope with it then spending 30 minutes in cold water will, for natural survival purposes, cause a rapid reduction (by stages in series) in blood flow capacities and blood pressure affecting the ability of the system to provide organs like muscles, the stomach and digestive tract with sufficient oxygenated blood.

 

The initial trigger to this natural survival process is signaled to, and initiated in, the hypothalmus due to cooling of the extremities (feet and hands*) the process being confirmed, intensified and accelerated by further signals from nerves along the lower legs and arms.

 

This is what people often suffer from when exposed to unusual (for them) cold temperatures in dry air too.

 

*For reference purposes at a core body temperature of 37°C in an ambient temperature of 20°C the average normal temperature measured at the hands or feet is 28°C.

 

Narrowing of the veins and arteries in the extremities first causes minor discomfort but, if someone disregards that signal for 15 minutes or more, the process continues undeterred in order to protect the most vital organs (brain, heart, lungs, kidneys).

 

Recovery from exposure is a relatively slow process and should not be expected to take less than some hours, even in the best of circumstances. I'm somewhat dubious about there being any benefits to be hoped for by going into a Sauna after spending more than 10 - 15 mins in cold water.

 

I don't actually know if such things as scuba boots or gloves are available but, if so and you were to use them, they may enable you to continue swimming for 30 minutes in cold water without triggering that natural survival circulatory shutdown process and all its associated after effects. 

 

Hopefully you will be able to continue as a(n all-temperature) @swimmer

 

2B

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This is really interesting and helpful, had not seen it in those terms, thanks for giving your time to explain it :).   Come to think about it, I was wondering why I feel nothing at 30 mins (and indeed it was more this time) when, in the warm, I got tired and felt "enough, time to get out".   (Sauna was 24+ hours after, btw, just to make me feel happier, and get out and moving etc). 

 

I have got some swimgloves that someone once gave me decades ago and I wondered when I could possibly ever need them.  But of course I still won`t: as I now must strictly go back to the warm bath day.   Some people seem to spend ages in the cold bath, just like milling around, no idea how they do that, perhaps they cannot move :wacko:.

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I have never come across a Hallenbad having cold water days.   Many have warm days, and not so warm days.  But no heating at all in winter?  Many have a cold water Tauschbecken, and of course outdoor pools can be nippy at the beginnng of the season if they rely on Solar and not very sunny.  Any links?

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4 hours ago, swimmer said:

Come to think about it, I was wondering why I feel nothing at 30 mins (and indeed it was more this time) when, in the warm, I got tired and felt "enough, time to get out".

 

I understand that, under certain critical circumstances, the hypothalmus proritizes the distribution of signals sent via the sympathic nervous system in such a way that lower priority signals are less likely to be responded to with the type of feedback which might make you aware of things like being in pain, tired or having a normal concept of the passing of time.

 

This, albeit different, is similar to what happens when people are exposed to a fight or flight situation and even those who are sedentary or untrained can suddenly achieve physical results which defy logic.

 

4 hours ago, swimmer said:

  Some people seem to spend ages in the cold bath, just like milling around, no idea how they do that, perhaps they cannot move 

 

Perhaps they feel 'comfortably numb'.

 

During WW I, in the trench warfare of France and Belgium, tens of thousands of men spent many days ankle deep in dirty cold water often being unaware of the fact that they were suffering from 'trench foot' or frostbite until they were returned to the rear where many of them had to undergo the immediate amputation of (dead) toes. Lots of them were unfortunately already infected by gangrene which resulted in having to have increasing numbers of amputations over the rest of their lives.

 

2B

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On 21.2.2019, 21:27:53, AnswerToLife42 said:

No reason to be unhappy, people who emigrated from Europe to America 100 years ago would never see their relatives again.

You can hop on a plane fly to SA in 12 to 15hrs. 550 to 660€

That is much easier said than done.

It was just a sad feeling for missing out on something. I know that immigration now-a-days is much easier, but there are still going to be harder days, regardless of this fact. But I'm sure everyone on this forum knows this feeling. :)

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A German friend here, around 66 years old, was up in the hills walking his two dogs a couple of days ago and was confronted by a hunter with a pack of dogs. Our friend was probably a bit unfriendly as he shouted at the hunter´s dogs but anyway...the local guy was offended, took out his shotgun and ordered our friend to get on his knees and apologize THREE times..otherwise he would shoot him. He obeyed him....Jeez.

No, no point going to the cops...our friend is the foreigner here and the locals are clannish...

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My high school in Chicago had its unheated swimming pool in the basement.  One semester my PE class met at 8 AM, thus being the first group into the pool after the weekend.  It was winter, and that water was appallingly cold.  It also had so much chlorine in it, with a school population of almost 2000 to keep healthy, that my hair, then still a pale blonde, began to turn green.

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4 hours ago, katheliz said:

my hair, then still a pale blonde, began to turn green.

 

Reading that sent a chilling shiver through my embedded file of memories of early childhood.

 

It was a Sunday afternoon, maybe the second or third week we had our first rental black and white TV, in early 1957 and only BBC (Scotland) was on air at the time. I was about 3 (and a 1/4!!) :D so I was quite excited having just been told there was a childrens matinee film coming on.

 

The announcer said the 1948 film to be shown was a childrens fantasy comedy but, although my 6 year old sister and me were mesmerized and watched every second of it, I did not see anything to laugh about and yet...

 

it made a very deep impression on me although I had not learned enough words at the time to explain my feelings about it - even now, although the memory, impression and feelings from then remain as if it was yesterday,  I'd struggle to describe just how incredibly sad I felt for

The Boy With Green Hair

 

With Pat O'Brien, Barbara Hale (who we recognized from playing secretary to Perry Mason) and a very convincing 12 year old Dean Stockwell as the lead. If you haven't already seen it you'd probably appreciate the story in particular with relation to the time it was filmed.

 

Strangely, although almost everyone in the movie had a different explanation for the cause, I don't remember chlorine in the swimming pool being mentioned as a possibility! :rolleyes:

 

And I just now found out it was filmed in Technicolor! :wacko:

 

Thank goodness we kids had good imaginations in those days! :lol:

 

2B

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I'm sad because John's stories from Greece have started to take on an unhappy tone - the killing and abandonement of many pet animals, the clannish and violent locals, the corruption of local government...

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2 hours ago, Metall said:

...the clannish and violent locals, the corruption of local government...

... unfortunately, it ain't just Greece...

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45 minutes ago, optimista said:

... unfortunately, it ain't just Greece...

 

True, I saw a lot of that on Malta. We used to support the SPCA there, and the organization triggered the passing of local laws  punishing the dumping of pets.

That plus a spay and neuter program cut down on the hordes of starving sick cats and dogs within a few years.

The corruption however still abides.

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So my boys are 80, 85-ish. And they just can't do it any more. But nobody is saying what needs to be said that nobody wants to hear. It really is quite tragic.

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John - I'm not sure if you have heard of PAWS? People's Animal Welfare Society.

 

I was an active member in Saudi. I helped transport captured strays in my car to the vets who would spey/neuter them. I rescued two strays of my own (and transported them back to the UK on repat). We ran dinner dances (oiled with decent home brewed wine!) to raise money for it every month which I attended regularly. I also swam a sponsored swim for them. They are brilliant of they are near you.

 

Greece has them. Here:

 

https://www.paws.gr/

http://www.paws-peliongreece.com/

https://straypawsfromgreece.com/

 

Good luck. 

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Thanks, jeremy! Great work you did in Saudi!

http://takis-shelter.org/

A Cretan hero --an ex-dentist in our area. Gave it up and is now looking after over 300 dogs (and even a goat now ). Bloody hero.

I saw three new strays in our village area today..THREE. All looking bewildered...

They should bring in a law to chain the locals around their necks on one metre leashes in all weathers outside. 

 

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5 hours ago, john g. said:

I saw three new strays in our village area today..THREE. All looking bewildered...

 

*sigh*

So they were dumped in the village - kicked out of the car *zooms off*...

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Be careful what you post about flooding John, otherwise J² and Coolnesspersonified  will start posting nonsense about your house floating away too... 

 

Or maybe J² could hurry up and finish off that boat he has been building for the past 4 yrs or more... and donate it to John_gs ARSE. (Animal Rescue Service Enterprise)

 

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