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Hunting and trapping - the law in Germany

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No Cruiser is right, that one post has just changed my opinion of hunters and hunting completely.

 

Even hunters that I know personally and who are more interested in conservation and preservation than in self-gratification or trophy taking are obviously mudering bastards and perverts and sadists to boot.

 

Once again TT has set me on the right path.

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Not true, they're all mudering bastards and should be subjected to the same - or worse - treatment as the poor defenseless animals which they persecute for their own sadistic, perverted pleasure.

You do not seem to know much about hunting. Over here they eat what they shoot and as we all know, the Germans eat virtually every part of every animal. I do not see that shooting something and then eating it is a problem though if hunters just went round shooting everything they saw and left it to rot then I would have a problem with that.

 

Sometimes you need hunters. The wild boar situation in some parts of the country is completely out of control and as a result the local councils have held "open weeks" whereby hunters can go hunting for free. The problem, I am told, is that due to hunting being so controlled and expensive, not many people go hunting and the wild boar population in some areas has grown to unsustainable levels. The boars are destroying vast tracts of forest, wild vegetation (that other wild creatures depend upon for their own survival), crops and can present a very real danger to people during the season when they have their "litters". No-one wants the boars re-located (for obvious reasons) and there seems to be no alternative but to shoot and eat them.

 

If you could think of a viable alternative that we suit everyone and the boars then I am sure that your suggestions would be welcomed.

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Oh dear !

 

Seems that you may be a little uneducated in this matter.

There are many hunters that hunt not for self-gratification, but for extremely valid reasons.

There needs to be population control of wild animals, to enable long term survival of their species..

I could go on.. but fear that you already have an ill informed bias against the practice of hunting.

 

and b4 you ask.. No, im not a hunter, have never hunted, and never intend to hunt.

That's why I specifically wrote 'In the name of self-gratification'. I accept that there are valid reasons for animal population control etc in certain circumstances but I think these cases are in a very small minority compared with animal killings soley in the name of pleasure, especially here in Germany... am I wrong?

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Not true, they're all mudering bastards and should be subjected to the same - or worse - treatment as the poor defenseless animals which they persecute for their own sadistic, perverted pleasure.

So this is a classic internet posting deescalation ?

 

It starts off with all being mudering bastards, then it's only some and in a few more posts you'll be advocatoing compulsory hunting classes for everybody or something equally daft.

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I'd have a real problem thinking up something as daft as this comment!

Yet you did advocate the shooting of hunters ?

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That's why I specifically wrote 'In the name of self-gratification'. I accept that there are valid reasons for animal population control etc in certain circumstances but I think these cases are in a very small minority compared with animal killings soley in the name of pleasure, especially here in Germany... am I wrong?

I would most definitely say you are wrong. Hunting is strictly controlled in Germany. Areas of hunting ground are leased to the hunters and they hunt for as a way of making a living, or at least part of it. What they kill is eaten. One of the Restaurants in my village often has a sign outside advertising "Freshly shot venison" As an aside, if you run over a deer or boar it belongs to whoever has the hunting rights not you, so don't take it home! At least thats how it was explained to me.

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As an aside, if you run over a deer or boar it belongs to whoever has the hunting rights not you, so don't take it home! At least thats how it was explained to me.

Yep, that's right. Mr. ajohnson had a mishap with a deer a month or so back. Not only did the police have to come out to work the accident. The local hunter had to come out as well to take possession of the deer's remains.

 

In fact, it goes even farther than that. Apparently, the local hunter can be held liable for damage caused by the wild animals in his appointed area. He can be made to pay for or repair the damage under certain circumstances. The way it was explained to me, is that the damage (to crops, to personal property, etc.) in theory would not happen if the hunter had properly controlled the animal population. In our case, the damage to the car was paid out by the hunter's insurance, not our auto insurance.

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Hunting, when properly controllled and carried out, is also one of the few effective methods of integrating open sections of forestry with tillage.

 

A correctly controlled wildlife population is healthier and minimises damage to the forestry, the farmers crops and the wildlife population itself.

 

A hunter who interested in conversation (an integral part of the hunting courses here) will find that the majority of his kills will be the weaker or older animals, much the same as a natural predator will remove these animals from the population. Unfortunately these natural predators no longer exist in germany. There is very little self-gratification involved in long evenings spend waiting to shoot a injured or crippled deer but the hunter does know that the population of deer in his area will benefit from it. As will the forest itself.

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Thank you for this insight which makes good sense to me. Unfortunately these acts of caring conservation are not the whole story, not by a long way.

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I never claimed that they were the whole story, but I think that, based on hunters I know, the majority are deeply interested in wildlife and very much in touch with the interaction between all the lifeforms that exist together in habitats that they hunt.

 

There are black sheep and fools in every walk of life, there are hunters who select the wrong animals to kill, shoot badly, ignore following up on these botched kills thus allowing animals to bleed to death slowly or die painfully of infection or starvation.

 

Just as there are conservationists who are prepared to endanger human life in order to make a point about what they feel strongly about.

 

Unfortunately, for someone looking at the situation from outside these two exceptions to the majority are what attracts our attention and polarises arguments for and against.

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It's funny how the anti-hunting people only worry about "pretty" animals - seals, foxes etc.

 

Also not concerned by the fact that the "pretty" animals are not endangered or possibly a natural crop or even endangering other wildlife.

 

Very selective...

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Don't forget, the first qualification for becoming an "anti-hunt" person is living nowhere near the countryside, but claiming to have an "O" level in biology plus being a "monitor" at school biology pond. :P

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It's funny how the anti-hunting people only worry about "pretty" animals - seals, foxes etc.

 

Also not concerned by the fact that the "pretty" animals are not endangered or possibly a natural crop or even endangering other wildlife.

 

Very selective...

Don't forget, the first qualification for becoming an "anti-hunt" person is living nowhere near the countryside, but claiming to have an "O" level in biology plus being a "monitor" at school biology pond.

And Human's are the 'highest' form of animal life on this planet? Thank god for the compassionate people of this world who don't share the attitude expressed above.

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The compassionate people of the world only have the luxury of compassion because they belong to the group of superpredators.

 

This tends to be forgotten

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Just a little fun with selective quoting:

 

 

A hunter who interested in conversation ... There is very little self-gratification involved in long evenings ... but the hunter ... will benefit from it. As will the forest itself.

On to a serious topic:

 

 

And Human's are the 'highest' form of animal life on this planet? Thank god for the compassionate people of this world who don't share the attitude expressed above.

As compared other omnivore mammals on the planet, humans are probably the most civilized hunters. I've never seen a hunter sink his teeth into a deer still squirming with life. Do you know how animals kill each other? I'd much rather be shot through the chest with a high-powered rifle than have my throat ripped out or watch my flesh eaten while I slowly lost consciousness. Sorry for the graphic descriptions, but that's nature outside these protective bubbles of civilization.

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The compassionate people of the world only have the luxury of compassion because they belong to the group of superpredators.

 

This tends to be forgotten

Humans are now the superpredators. Guns (especially the new ones) changed the game. I would not want to go up against a lion, tiger, bear (especially a Polar Bear) with only a spear. If you look at Native American cultures (just for an example), they very healthly respect for animals.

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@Freiheit

 

Nature red in tooth and claw ?

 

@Cookie

 

We are the superpredators, but only as long as we have access to our technology and have the ability to use it.

 

A human, equipped only with his natural weapons, is a puny counterpart to a lion, tiger, wild boar or shark, in their natural environment.

 

We are slower, weaker, less attuned to the natural environment, and possibly more restrained through the conditioning of civilisation than they are.

 

I also can't see a maneating lion turning up a selfhelp group to deal with the aprobation of his peers because he has made off with another "victim" .

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