Favourite German words

469 posts in this topic

No surprise, but mine is "Scheiße!".

Mostly because it's so common that even little kids use it around their parents. I heard a little girl (approx 10 yr) say it to her dad in a museum because her brother was acting like a jerk and she ended up getting in trouble for hitting him. I was hysterical!

 

It's just like "Coño" in Spain.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spelling may be dubious but what does "Schatsi" mean ? Is this a term you would use to friends or lovers ? ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Schatzi literally means little treasure - you'd say it to a lover/partner, with a tinge of affectionate irony if you're under the age of about 30 because it's not exactly cutting-edge (think sweetie-pie or honeybun). Mind you, what do English-speaking twenty- and thirtysomethings actually call their partners these days (asks Grandma)? Haven't called mine anything apart from "Hey you" for ages.

Bugger, now I can't get that dreadful German dirndl-pop song "Schatzilein, du musst nicht traurig sein" out of my head. How did that ever get stuck in the brain cells?

*off to find Damned CD*

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I discovered a few days ago the use of the word "Klammeraffe" to refer to @ (the "at-sign"). My colleague used it and I had to stop him to first have him explain the term to me, and then to have a laugh about it. It's a good word, though. Sounds better than at-sign.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Griabig, Sauber, drecksau, achso, meine Gutte, Depp.

 

favorite sentence: Ich bin ein sportive type. haha don't ask me why though.

 

and of course das stimmt nicht!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like "geh schleich Dich, Saupreiss Du englischer". Or "Zeitung" as most anglo speakers can't pronounce it. <_<

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how can someone be a Saupreiss and a English person? This is also an odd formulation can you really put it together like that? honest question my german being FAR from presentable.

 

I also thought Zeitung was fairly straightforward word which shouldn't pose much difficulty :blink: or does the 'z' cause more problems than I would have suspected?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok iain,

Most know that Bavarians call North Germans "Preussen". But jokingly they call all "foreigners" "Preissn" in their dialect.

The word Zeitung starts with a sharp short "ts" sound and not a soft "zet" as taught in English.

Aber das weisst Du doch, oder?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was more the formation of the sentence that had me thrown. Just doesn't really make much sense to me. Then again I'm definitely not Bavarian.

 

I knew their was a zed in english which is different from the german z (ts short sharp however you want to describe it) but I didn't realize converting to the german z would cause soo many people discomfort. :blink: I would of thought other problems would be much more noticeable.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scheibenkleister... what kids say instead of swearwords.

 

Ganz toll!... with my thumb in the air I look like a loser.

 

Staatsangehorigkeit... the first longish word I learnt.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the word I kind of "came up" with to call my hubby. He is an active guy and when he comes home smelling of sweat and tries to kiss me, I run off. One day I said to him "Stay away, Stinkermann!" And ever since, it has been his little nickname. His mother even jokes around and calls him that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our German language assistant at school taught us the three degrees of "geil" in increasing order of "geil"ness:

"geil", "affengeil" and "turboaffengeil".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It was more the formation of the sentence that had me thrown. Just doesn't really make much sense to me. Then again I'm definitely not Bavarian.

Don't understand it either, but then I'm from North Germany...must be v Bavarian.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now