Favourite German words

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Some German words are just way more powerful than their English counterparts. "Hass" and "Liebe" are great examples. In English, the daughter can yell, "I hate you!" and run off crying, when she actually doesn't hate her mother/father at all. In German. If you "hass" someone, you basically want them dead. Many Americans, myself included, say "Love ya, bro", when what we really mean is that we like him and it would matter to us if the dude died.

 

Another great example is the German word "geniessen". I like that so much better than the English counterparts "enjoy" or "savor". It just means so much more, in my opinion. To geniess something is to want to enjoy it with every fiber of your being. That may apply to anything from food to people. "this steak is just so good, I want to experience this taste and this beautiful aroma for the rest of my life". "Ich will dich geniessen". We don't say I want to savor you. We may want to savor the experience, but in German, you can express your desire to savor someone, to enjoy their very being and not just enjoy or savor the experience that you are sharing with them.

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When ever I go the the butcher and ask if they have some British beef I get reminded about the Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz

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@Nina: And in Dutch it can be used in a much wider range of situations than in German *evil grin*

 

In the Rheinland, too. Lecker Mädsche etc. Ok, you might argue that the Rheinland is somewhat dutch.

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... Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz

 

Grundstücksverkehrsgenehmigungszuständigkeitsübertragungsverordnung beats that by 4 letters and is rumoured to be the longest German word

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1) Dicksaft (syrup), always good for a chuckle (like a 13 year old), Dickjuice omg lol

 

2) any animal with -bär; there are tons. Try a search on leo.org. We love the washbear (racoon).

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"Mut" and "Wut". I assume that if you have courageous rage, it could be "Mutwut", by the properties of German compounding. Say it out loud, it's hilarious.

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Blutrausch

Lachkonserve

grenzdebil

Frühlingsgefühle

Blümerant

Gesocks

Prachtweib

Höhenrausch

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Might have said it before, my partner loves the word 'Techtelmechtel' and also 'fremdschaemen'

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My favourite has always been steuerrückzahlung

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As there seem to be quite a lot of topics about dating I would say people are having 'Fruehlingsgefuehle'

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can't speak or understand German, reply Achsoo! Everytime Germans talk to you ... and smile together ..

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Geschirrrueckgabe - describing something we don't have a word for in the UK because we don't do it! (except for in IKEA)

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I like the sound of Umgebung.

 

That's one that I keep misreading as OOM guh boong, rather than oom GAY boong...

 

And then there's the job ad I was sent asking me if I were interested in a job as a Bibelinkunabelforscher

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Wehleidig. For all those people who need to take off their scarves, stop drinking crazy types of tea and just plain old MAN UP!

 

Bummeln.

 

And for some reason I love the town name Wuppertal. The town itself is not that great, just the name :)

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Eichhörnchen (squirrel). Its just so weird to pronounce.

 

I used to always say Einhörnchen instead. I guess it is sort of a mythical creature half unicorn and half squirel :-)

 

My wife always had to correct me when I said Judenherberger instead of Jugendherberger :-0

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