English-speaking dentists in Munich

241 posts in this topic

Hi chewy,

According to the DAAD site, it looks like you will have to pay the Praxisgebühr plus possibly smaller costs not covered by your "gesetzliche" insurance.

The main fees will be covered by your insurer directly and as long as you remember to show your insurance chip card from your Krankenkasse then you won't get a huge bill. People who are privately insured (i.e. not in a "gesetzliche Kasse") generally pay their bills and claim it back, this is not the prctice for the "gesetzlichen".

You can ask for an estimate too before any work is done and this is (generally) free.

Katrina

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@Katrina, thanks u soo much for ur help on this matter, ive emailed a few of the dentists to see what they say.

 

from the translation of the page i got i take it praxisgebühr is the practice fee, is that the fee for just looking at me? and any sort of idea of the price range im looking at? health comes b4 money etc, but it does make a difference atm (unfortunately) and i just need to be prepared.

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Hi

you're welcome! The Praxisgebühr is just the fee for setting foot in a doctor's/dentist's surgery frankly - people that are state-insured ("gesetzliche") have to pay 10€ per doctor per quarter (unless specific conditions apply which they probably won't in your case - sorry) that they use, whether it is for a new knee or a new prescription.

It is not a bill for treatment, just an up-front tax for going and is only paid the first time per quarter per doctor/dentist (I'm not phrasing this very well!).

So you make an appointment, you turn up, the receptionist says "10€ please" and you pay. Fair or not, that's just how things are currently and the doctor's surgery doesn't get any benefit from the 10€, it all goes to the Kasse.

Any treatment charges are billed to your Kasse - you get a list of the costs but do not pay them. If there are costs which are not covered, you will get a bill for those (such as teeth bleaching or v. posh glass ceramic inlays - normal ceramics are generally covered for example). So if you go, your first question is "does this dentist treat 'gesetzliche' patients?", if so make an appointment then you should be prepared for the 10€ charge. You should always ask for a estimate of work and costs. If you are not comfortable, choose someone else (but you'll pay the 10€ again).

General check-ups are free from the 10€ but if it looks like work needs to be done you might end up paying so take the 10€ with you but it might not be charged (or at least not at the first appointment).

I hope this helps and that I haven't made something complicated even more muddled! ;)

Katrina

PS One last thing! If you go in September, try and get all the work done in September as October counts as a new quarter and you'll get charged the 10€ *twice*.

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Nope that makes sense. Got a reply from one of the recommended english speaking ones, so gonna make an appointment tomorrow if its still bad. thanks

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This is almost cheaper than going to the dentist in the uk, i pay my health insurance so may as well use it!

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Hey Katrina, is this guy a dentist or orthodontist? So any private insurance should cover a visit with this guy? I haven't been to the dentist in probably 15 years, so I'd like to make an appointment and I'm sure I'll need at least one root canal. Is there any chance my insurance company will complain that I could have gone to someone cheaper?

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Hi

he does both and there should be no problem with the bill either - he charges according to the normal scales. It is up to you if you want extras such as bleaching (the DVDs are free though). Being a private patient means that you can shop around and get some quotes.

If you really need a lot of work done (or are having general anaesthetic which he offers too as the clinic is run together with an anaesthetic specialist), get a detailed quote and send it in to your insurer *before* the treatment and wait for their response before having treatment - it saves a lot of hassle later and will give you a good idea of the costs. And ask about direct billing to your insurer too. Sometimes this is possible. Last but not least, check the limits on your policy!

Katrina

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All dentists are sadistic bastards!!

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hey IPJ, how was your appt.? i am looking for a second opinion, so made an appt with him too. his website was so dazzly, I am a little intimidated! and with the t.v. show thing, if i can afford him?

 

i am missing a molar and it is time to get an implant. the upper tooth just keep growing and growing down and one day i am afraid i will start drilling into my jaw. i know i'll be stuck with the costs, but i don't want to end up like those old ladies with no back teeth and a sunk-in jaw. :o

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Actually, I liked him a lot, which is why I sort of defended him in this thread: Dental procedures: Dentistry costs, insurance, etc.. His English is certainly good enough, though not anything to write home about. He will, however, definitely try for the most money he can get out of your insurance (i.e. opt for ceramic instead of cheaper materials), but I don't think he'd go so far as convincing you that you need work done that isn't necessary. He did suggest to replace some other fillings while he was replacing some due to cavities, but it was quite clear that it wasn't necessary and that it was my decision.

 

The office is very nice, his receptionist from Berlin is super friendly and loves speaking English (she lived in the UK for awhile), and I did see those little DVD-watching glasses sitting on the counter when I was there last (never seen 'em before - of course my last dentist appointment was before DVDs...). I haven't had the work done yet, but I'll let you know when I do. I do have a good feeling about it.

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i'm cross-referencing to the other dental service thread Dental procedures: Dentistry costs, insurance, etc cause i wanted to make an appointment with an english speaking dentist, Dr. Oppenberg. He only takes private patients and was out sick for 4 weeks. Next available appt. end of January.

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I work in a German Dental office, that everyone there can speak English, and the doctors regularily attend and give lecuters in English. Its a large Private office.

Zentrum für Zahnheilkunde

Rosenkavalierpl. 18

Arabellapark Ubahn,

 

We also have 4 TRAINED Dental Hygienists on staff! That is important, as in Germany there is no official training for DH's, but if anyone in the office does the cleaning beside the Doctor and its not a foreign trained DH, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO PAY!!! It is ILLEGAL, for anybody but the Dr. or the DH to charge certain fees, like the fees for a cleaning. This is a word of warning. If you are a Kassepatient, and want a cleaning then call, Beate Gatermann (trained in Chicago), and has her own office in Bogenhausen, 912442.

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Received by e-mail:

 

========================================

 

Dentist: David Casey - native English speaking (Irish)

Altheimer Eck 3, City Center

Tel. 089 26024250

 

Qualified in Birmingham, U.K., in 1991.

Worked in a private practice in Windsor, U.K., between 1991 and 2004.

 

Recently moved to Munich (October 2004). Is currently working under Dr. Hey.

In January 2005 he takes over the practice as his own.

 

========================================

 

Beate Gatermann, RDH, SDH

Veit-Pogner-Str. 23, near Arabellapark

Tel. 089 912442

gaterman@dentalhygienepraxis.de

www.dentalhygienepraxis.de

 

The only registered Dental Hygienist in Germany working without a dentist. Beate speaks fluent english and charges less than most offices (€100.- per hour). She is a professional and dedicated dental hygienist - this is different from most dental surgeries where the hygiene work is usually done by dental assistants with little education and no Diploma.

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Thanks Editor Bob for advertising Beate Gaterman, I spend so much time telling people, that there are hardly any trained Dental Hygienists working in Germany, I feel like I am running into a wall.

 

You will get a cleaning like you are used to, not a German 10 minute quick scrap and polish. The Assistants are NOT legally allowed to do these procedures, but you get billed for it.

 

So if you want a real dental cleaning call Beate (above number) or Carmen 9287840.

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i'm new to Munich and I'm looking for a good English speaking Dentist and Orthodontist - can anyone recommend one? i have public health insurance, so I'd also kinda like to find someone that won't give me a dirty look when I walk in the door...:)

 

What about a good eye doctor?

 

Topic merged by admin

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A good eye doctor definitely shouldn't give you a dirty look when you walk through the door. ;)

 

For a dentist I'd recommend using the search function and ultimately finding this link. Good luck.

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Claude, I cannot recommend highly enough the dentist in Untermenzing off of Von Kahr Strasse above the Tengelmann by Angelohe Strasse. I would go back to them anyday and may yet. Otherwise, I have found a very good dentist in Freimann with a big blue tooth outside the office. It is a tossup as I have only been to the new place once and the other place for several years. As for orthodontics, you have to go to a dentist first and get recommended. I went to a very nice orthodontist in Pasing and they seem to be very well liked according to many of my German friends. English speaking is a plus, but does not make the practitioner any better at their primary job. To be honest, I would rather that they know more about the job at hand than simply speak English. ;)

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I'm still working on finding a good dentist here myself (I pay on my own for private care not covered by the state scheme). And I was even engaged to a German dentist in the very distant past (maybe that's why I find it so difficult to trust them <_< )

 

As for eye care - if you need to check that your glasses are still ok or if you actually need them, and your eyes aren't giving you any other problems, then I would skip the Augenarzt and go to an Optiker. There is a really good one down the street from the Twisted Bavarian, Schwabrillion on Tengstrasse and the owner "Johnny" speaks English. I have known him for years, and trust him with my kid's glasses as well. No appointment necessary and he really takes his time with the examination.

 

For serious eye problems I could recommend Dr. Suess (seriously spellt with an Umlaut and sharp S, but not on this US laptop) near Bonnerplatz.

 

Good luck

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Dr. Suess

Now that is a name to live up too. ;) I may check out your friend "Johnny" as my eyes get tired to fast lately. I went to a neighborhood doc and she said my eyes suck, then I went to the clinic at the university and they said that I had perfest vision and that the reason my eyes sucked was because I was getting older. Ican no longer bounce back like I used too. Therefore, I need some funky glasses for working on the computer. Maybe, just maybe, I need a new job?

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