Elterngeld and Kindergeld (various info/advice)

585 posts in this topic

Way back, 30 years back, it was normal for a wife not to work. Then all those other women got educated, and got jobs ... and as a result things got more expensive in general. But that also means there is much more tax and it seems reasonable enough for some of that taxation to support lower income families, that struggle to make ends meet, have a family.

 

At this end of the income scale it is much cheaper to stay at home and get an extra 200e from the state and stretch that 200e far (home cooking, ebay etc) than it is to work in a low paying job which pays minimal tax AND then have to pay for child care, processed baby food, transportation ALL of which will be subsidised from the state anyway. Its just work for no reason, its completely non economic, but it makes the nasty people happy.

 

Go have a kid, its natural and its fun. The Government makes these benefits available for a reason, there needs to be a workforce in 30 years time to pay for the retirement of all the nasty people in Germany that you will come across because you so graciously make a sacrifice to maintain the population. And if you find a job in the mean time take it, every little bit of savings will help, then when the kids are a bit older perhaps you find a job and pay some tax to keep everyone happy :)

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She would get more with elterngeld. ANy hartz4 she received would be stipend based on the bf income, whereas elterngeld is not. SO what is the problem?

 

The German government has plenty of support for families without the use of Hartz4.

 

If she gets even a mini job she gets:

 

Mutterschutz

Kindergeld

Eltern geld

 

SHe can stay home up to 3 years and 14 months is paid in elterngeld. After that she can apply for landeserzeihungsgeld for the second year of life, assuming it is offered in that bundesland.

 

Even if she is unemployed without hartz 4 she gets

Eltern geld (if available landeserzeihungsgeld the 2 year as well)

kindergeld

 

If she gets hartz 4 she gets

A amount altered based on BF income

and kindergeld

No elterngeld

No mutterschutz

 

She get more the other way even with the minimum. And if she gets a good job she gets much more the minimum she gets 65% of her pay for that elterngeld.

 

If they are low income, she can get additional support from various means then the hartz4 which would disqualify her from many parental benefits.

 

If she takes hartz4 she is closing those doors.

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]

"Kids are actually cheap, specially in Germany."

 

Yes, when they're young. We were poor when our kids were little and made do on second-hand and cast-offs. But it was good that our income went up so that we could later pay for music lessons, class trips, sports club fees, the occasional cool itme of clothing, computer etc. Though now when they are both studying it wouldn't be bad to be poor again so they would get Bafög and we wouldn't have to pay everything.

 

I know people on low incomes who have brought up their children very successfully, but I think both parents and kids have to have a strong character.

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first of all, thanks for the answers..

and serenajean1..I dont want to explor the system..because i do know how that sucks..for everyone..

i am looking for work..but i didn't find one where my little understanding of german it's enought..not even in one the three cleaning companies that i went, i was accepted..and in other places that i went is the same thing except in one but i didn't have bus to go to work in that schedule..i seriously hope that when we finish up of dealing with all the papers i already have a job..but as the things are going i dont know if that will happen..and looking for a job was the main reason for me to join the forum..there is a job section here..and i am also looking for a baby sitting job..

and i am not planning a pregnancy, i just wanna be ready in case that happens...but we are avoing it..

i dont want to lay on the ystem, i really dont..that's why we waited two months before we go ask for help..

and i am asking this now because i do really want to me a mom..i want it since i remember..and i wanted to know what my chances are if i do get pregnant before i find a job..just that..

i didnt mean to ofend anyone..

:)

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Cathy,

No harm, no foul. As you can see Germany has an amazing social system in place, especially for parents. There are plenty of resources you can utilize, regardless of if you are employed at the time or not, without falling into the welfare system.

 

Good luck.

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I've been working full time for the last 2.5 years. If I were to get pregnant and subsequently leave my job I would get Elterngeld (67% of my monthly earnings). Elterngeld is paid by the Government, not by my employer. I would get that money for 1 year - then I would go back to work.

 

Am I understanding this right?

 

Kate

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Law changed, it is now 65% of pay.

 

The 65% is paid by the government for up to 12 months, 14 if dad takes at least 2 as well.

 

But you can take up to 3 years off with elternzeit, but the final 2 years are unpaid. Some states offer landeserziehungsgeld, but that is income regulated, and only the second year of life.

 

YOu can go back to work anytime in those 3 years, as your job will be secured. But you must notify your employer in advance of your intent.

 

This also does not apply to timed contracts, in which case you can take the time, but your job contract will likely not be renewed, they are not legally required to renew contracts. Only to hold posistion in unbefirstet contracts.

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I've been working full time for the last 2.5 years. If I were to get pregnant and subsequently leave my job I would get Elterngeld (67% of my monthly earnings). Elterngeld is paid by the Government, not by my employer. I would get that money for 1 year - then I would go back to work.

 

Am I understanding this right?

 

Kate

 

Not quite, but close.

 

Your year will be split into two time periods. Period one - 12 weeks after the birth you are in "Mutterschutz", and your pay is covered 100% by your employer and your health insurance. (minus 13 euro per day- or something like that). You also have Mutterschutz before the birth, 6 weeks I believe, that can be shifted to after the birth where necessary. Your health insurance will be very interested in all the dates and forms etc... which you will need from your employer.

 

After your Mutterschutz is over, you will go into Elternzeit, or back to work. Elternzeit can be up to 3 years from the date of your baby's birth. Elterngeld will be paid out for a period of max 12 months, but you need to check for each individual case. Elterngeld is based on a percentage of your average last 12 month's salary, to a max of 1800 euro (at least at the time I was in Elternzeit). You will need to provide paystubs as proof of your earnings. In my case, I received Mutterschutzgeld for 4 months, because my baby was a preemie, and Elterngeld for 8 months, for a total of 12 months. Now it's back to work...

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Hi,

 

My son was born 14.01.10. I am also taking paternity leave, so I will receive 2 months paid at 65% of my salary. I have already taken one month of paternity leave (14.07.10 to 13.08.10).

 

My question(s): Do I have to take my second month of paternity leave within the year he's born, i.e. 14.12.10 to 13.01.11) to still get 65% of my salary, or is it 14.02.11 to 13.03.11 (because I'm also taking leave and it's 14 months)?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

JumpmanPro

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Not quite, but close.

 

Your year will be split into two time periods. Period one - 12 weeks after the birth you are in "Mutterschutz", and your pay is covered 100% by your employer and your health insurance. (minus 13 euro per day- or something like that). You also have Mutterschutz before the birth, 6 weeks I believe, that can be shifted to after the birth where necessary. Your health insurance will be very interested in all the dates and forms etc... which you will need from your employer.

 

After your Mutterschutz is over, you will go into Elternzeit, or back to work. Elternzeit can be up to 3 years from the date of your baby's birth. Elterngeld will be paid out for a period of max 12 months, but you need to check for each individual case. Elterngeld is based on a percentage of your average last 12 month's salary, to a max of 1800 euro (at least at the time I was in Elternzeit). You will need to provide paystubs as proof of your earnings. In my case, I received Mutterschutzgeld for 4 months, because my baby was a preemie, and Elterngeld for 8 months, for a total of 12 months. Now it's back to work...

 

Good information, but slightly incorrect. In the case of a "normal birth" Mutterschutz is 6 weeks before birth and 8 weeks after: http://www.bmfsfj.de/BMFSFJ/gesetze,did=3264.html

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If you're privately insured, you do. If you're in the public system, the state does.

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Hi,

 

My son was born 14.01.10. I am also taking paternity leave, so I will receive 2 months paid at 65% of my salary. I have already taken one month of paternity leave (14.07.10 to 13.08.10).

 

My question(s): Do I have to take my second month of paternity leave within the year he's born, i.e. 14.12.10 to 13.01.11) to still get 65% of my salary, or is it 14.02.11 to 13.03.11 (because I'm also taking leave and it's 14 months)?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

JumpmanPro

 

Depends on what your wife/partner does while you're on Elternzeit. Elternzeit is a total of 14 months, between father and mother; this is not 14 calendar months. If your 2 months are taken simultaneously with your wife, then the total calendar duration is 12 months. If you both take Elternzeit at separate times (she 12 months then he 2 months), the total calendar duration is 14 months.

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I thought Elternzeit was up to 3yrs, and only 14months is actually paid. Normally only 12months is paid but if the father also takes time off then a total of 14months will be paid.

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I haven't read every post in this thread, so hopefully I'm not being redundant. But I just wanted to point out that figuring out whether you are entitled to Elterngeld during Elternzeit (or more importantly: how much $ you will get) really depends on 1. your visa/residence status and 2. if you are (or have been) paying taxes here. Some foreigners who move to Germany on studentships or scientific research fellowships are paid via 'tax free' stipends, and thus they will be entitled to *at most* ~300 Euro/month for the Elterngeld months (though they might be paid in full during the Mutterschutz period, which can only be taken by the mother). The rules are a bit hazy to follow since there are always exceptions, but basically, the government figures out (with help of your employer) how much Elterngeld you'll be paid by taking roughly 2/3 of the last 12 months of your TAXABLE income, and dividing by 12. The 12 months, I believe, are counted backwards starting from the last *full calendar month* that you worked which preceded the child's birth, even though Mutterschutz usually can start 6 weeks before the due date (but this info may not apply to all cases - you need to check). For people who have worked and been paying taxes in Germany for over a year, this doesn't matter but this small detail can make a difference in your Elterngeld paychecks if you were not paying into the system for the entire time, but say only part of the time.

In Munich, it's best to visit Bayerstr. 32 and talk to someone there, if you're not sure what your rights are for Elternzeit/Elterngeld.

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Just a remark: if you want to go to Munich, Bayerstr. 32, you will have to talk German.

I went there twice because I could not get helped on the phone to fill the forms. The first time was bad but I managed to get some information by insisting. The 2nd time I got (really) bad treated by a guy there, and had to stand a really aggressive man: I was there alone with a 1 month old baby. Really bad experience. So you'd better go there with a German speaking person...

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I am not sure why you would expect them to speak english. German law mandates that beamters must conduct all official business in German. It is the same no matter what office you go to. If by some chance you come across an english speaking beamter who will do business in English it is a rarity not the norm and nor should it be expected, you are living in Germany after all.

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