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Federweisser and Zwiebelkuchen

34 posts in this topic

 

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Autumn is the time for apples, conkers, the mushroom harvest, of cold mornings and sunny walks kicking up piles of leaves in mellow light. It's also an opportunity to take part in one of Germany's more refined methods of carnage.

 

Bit flat post-Oktoberfest? Pining for Glühwein (Pots of Evil) or the ski season?

 

Bridge that gap with the season's new wine - Federweisser.

 

Federweisser is the most popular type of new wine which has just started fermenting. Made from pressed white grape varieties, it contains yeast cells which produce the distinctive fizz. Federweisser can be used to describe wine from first production to nearly finished wine, can be like fizzy lemonade or smoother like a sparkling wine. It can be sweeter or more sour, that depends on age and type. Unfortunately, the sweetness hides the effect - it is potent stuff.

 

In Germany, Federweisser must contain at least 4% alcohol - it then ferments in the bottle, changing the sugar into alcohol until reaching about 11% alcohol. Don't store the stuff too long, it can actually explode - which is why bottles are not airtight and is also why it is most popular close to wine regions. Don't shake the bottle either! It is serious stuff and not to be taken lightly. On sale in Germany until about the end of October, in Austria from 1st August until 31st December (must contain at least 1% alcohol).

 

So what is the perfect thing to go with Federweisser? In the Pfalz, Saumagen would be served, which tastes better than it sounds and a great one can be had in Munich's Pfalzerweinstube im Residenz.

In Franken, Zwiebelkuchen (onion tart) is served. Or check out this lot in Rüdesheim.

 

Now does anyone have a recipe for me? The one I have here looks plain old dubious so any tips gratefully received. Flammkuchen and other onion-y recipes also welcome.

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Don't store the stuff too long, it can actually explode - which is why bottles are not airtight and is also why it is most popular close to wine regions. Don't shake the bottle either! It is serious stuff and not to be taken lightly.

A lot of brands actually have a hole punched in the middle of the screw top. ALWAYS carry Federweisse upright!

 

Every year my neighborhood Tengelmann puts a display of Federweisse right at the entrance of the store, and every year you can follow the spillage all the way to the cashier. You'd think they would put up a notice that care should be taken when transporting it, but no.

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Why does anybody drink this stuff. I tried it once, what a joke. I put it down to the chidish Germans who just can't wait for the wine to be made and have to taste it.

 

Like you do as a child when you lick out mums mixing bowl.

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Bloody hell Norfolk, the sooner you get back to UK the better !

 

Your continued hatred of Germany and all things German is really starting to wear thin now <_<

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I'm currently down in Markgräflerland - South of Schwarzwald and right on the borders of France and Switzerland.

This is a fine wine region, but most vineyards are quite small and the best wines tend not to leave this region.

One particularly nice red is "Feuerbacher" - anyone else heard of this one?

Anyway, at the moment wherever you go, whether pub, restaurant or just along the streets, "Neuer Süßer" is on offer with Zwiebelküchen and most people seem to be enjoying this.

Not exactly my own taste, but why decry it?

This is very Autumnal, it's almost like celebrating the new harvest and gives people a reason to enjoy what could be the last few days of sunshine before the Wintry weather sets in and drives them inside.

 

MT

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Feuerbach is a western suburb of Stuttgart (so not quite the region of Baden), and "Feuerbacher" wine is merely wine produced there. Mostly Trollinger probably, it's what they like to grow there.

But if it's red then most likely a Spätburgunder (pinot noir?)

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I would have thought that any wine coming from a wine gut would have acheived that standard yellow colour, lack body and have a rather pungent aroma ? I'm not prepared to comment on the smoothness.

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Federweisse I'm not too fussed about, but the Zwiebelkuchen is great. It's basically what we know as quiche, and this is the only time of the year when you can easily buy it in Germany.

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To me Federweisse is just like Egg Nog. It a special drink associated with a particular time of year. You have a glass or 2 each season and then don't think about it again until the next year.

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Now does anyone have a recipe for me? The one I have here looks plain old dubious so any tips gratefully received. Flammkuchen and other onion-y recipes also welcome.

Here you go, have made this many a time:

Schwäbischer Zwiebelkuchen

-Yeast dough (300 g flour, 20 to 30g yeast, 200ml water, salt, oil)

-1 to 1.5 kg onions

-butter

-6 tbsp flour

-2 to 4 eggs

-300 to 400 g sour cream

-salt

-caraway seeds

-bacon (Schinken) in cubes

 

1.Make the yeast dough then roll it out into a round form.

2.Peel onions, cut, and simmer in butter

3.Mix flour with eggs and sour cream, then add to onions

4.Season with salt and caraway

5.Spread out over dough and add the bacon (Schinken) cubes.

6.Bake in oven till golden brown

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Some areas call this, or a variation, "Sturm". I saw this first in Passau, then in Bad Tölz. There were plenty of bars posting "Stumwarnung"s , and recommending that you take shelter inside the bar ;)

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Cheers Lupo, I'll give that a whirl. Has to be a perfect one as it brings together bacon, butter, cream and onions together, covering nearly all the food groups. The missing food group appears in a glass mug alongside.

As an exchange, here's my very easy dish:

 

Lazy Flammkuchen

 

Take one pack of ready-made puff pastry, remove packaging and place on a lined baking tray. Prick the surface with a fork and then spread the surface thinly with either crème fraîche (naughty) or quark (slightly more saintly). Sprinkle over a generous amount of slivered onion and diced bacon lardons. Bake for about 20mins at 200°C until the pastry is crisp and topping cooked. It's a cheat, but a good one.

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Jeeves;

Feuerbach is (also) an extremely small village just outside Kandern where the Feuerbach river (stream size!) runs through.

 

This is the wine I was referring to.

MT

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What, two Feuerbachs that produce wine? ;)

Okey dokey, in that case I haven't tried it, no.

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Love it. How to take sub-standard grapes that will just make very crap wine and come up with a way to sell the stuff to the unsuspecting public by turning it into a "must have"... Fermenting grape juice with high brix and a yeasty taste. Well, should suit the Blue Nun and Liebfraumilch drinkers of the world when they run out of babycham

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These recipes sound heavenly...but currently lacking an oven, I would just love to find a high quality supplier of Zwiebelkuchen... for personal use only of course.

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kicking up piles of leaves in mellow light

:D I do that! And everyone looks at me strangely :(

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