What happens if Scotland gains independence?

825 posts in this topic

 

If Yes wins, it will be on the back of anti-English hatred and nationalism, there has been no sound economic or financial reasoning behind the Yes campaign. Devolution I agree with, giving the Scots the power to get rid of Faslane I agree with, but doing away with what is one of the most successful Unions between two nations in the history of civilisation for the sake of notions of romanticised battles of the past is insane.

 

That's a valid position to take, and that's fine by me. I don't agree, but such is life. I just didn't think it very helpful to include a veiled suggestion that those that have a different position on this issue would somehow be incapable of great feats of (rational) thought.

 

Oh, and were this about anti-English hatred, I don't think that would go away without a referendum, or with a No vote (there's a chance with a Yes vote, when the two nation states can operate a little more at the same level). And yes, there may be some unresolved issues (partly caused because the UK Govt refuses to negotiate on these items before a Yes result), but this is about democracy and self-determination (as can be seen from the fact that 97% of those eligible have registered to vote).

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I am pleased Mr Murray is a +1

 

Except he isn't, because the proud Scotsman lives in Surrey and therefore has no vote.

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Self determination is a myth.

 

I think the next step is some idiot claiming to be a decedent of MacBeth calling for Mormaerdom of Moray to declare its independence from the rest of Scotland.

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Incidentally, the most significant opinion poll of the entire campaign is going unreported on the BBC and other outlets today as they are only reporting on the voting itself to avoid influencing the outcome. A YouGov poll last night put No on 52% and Yes on 48% with only 6% still undecided. The sample size was 3,237, far higher than all the other polls and at the level considered pretty accurate.

 

The poll found that the undecideds who have made up their minds in the past few days have done so evenly between Yes and No. The so-called "missing million" who don't normally vote in elections appear to be 57-43 against independence.

 

YouGov - Scotland: No enters polling day 4% ahead

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Interestingly (was on the morning news), the fact that only *residents* in Scotland can vote in the referendum today causes the absurd situation that:

- Scotsmen living in Germany *can't* vote, and

- Germans living in Scotland *can* vote.

 

Absolutely weird.

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Interestingly (was on the morning news), the fact that only *residents* in Scotland can vote in the referendum today causes the absurd situation that:

- Scotsmen living in Germany *can't* vote, and

- Germans living in Scotland *can* vote.

 

Absolutely weird.

 

But like every other election and referendum in Scotland with the exception of elections for the Westminster parliament.

 

And to show you how things have changed, at the devolution referendum I voted No + Yes :P

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- Scotsmen living in Germany *can't* vote

 

But how could you define a Scotsman with reference to eligibility to vote in the referendum? Somebody born there? Somebody whose parents where born there. Or grandparents? Or great-grandparents? Somebody with a British passport and a Scots accent? Anybody who feels comfortable in a kilt? Anybody who wants to call themselves Scottish?

 

There are more "Scottish" people living in the US alone than in Scotland, so it would have had quite an influence on the referendum if all global Scots had been invited to vote.

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here are more "Scottish" people living in the US alone than in Scotland, so it would have had quite an influence on the referendum if all global Scots had been invited to vote.

 

...which is exactly why they weren't. ;)

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Interestingly (was on the morning news), the fact that only *residents* in Scotland can vote in the referendum today causes the absurd situation that:

- Scotsmen living in Germany *can't* vote, and

- Germans living in Scotland *can* vote.

 

Absolutely weird.

 

It all makes sense to me. The vote is NOT about Scotsmen & the Scottish identity, it is about people LIVING in Scotland and how they want their country to be governed. The outcome of the vote will affect the everyday life of people living in Scotland, whereas there will be little impact on a Scottish person living in Germany.

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If the yes votes win, how will that effect Scots living in Europe when they are no longer EU? i.e. work permits, etc.

 

Please excuse me if this has already been addressed.

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The honest answer is nobody knows, it is one of many things that must be negotiated after a yes vote.

 

Best case (and the desire of the SNP) is that Scotland remains in the EU and there is no impact.

 

Worst case would be that Scottish people would be treated as a non-EU country and Scottish people who exchanged their UK passport for a Scottish one (without any dual nationality) would require work permits.

 

My guess is that the reality is likely to be a period of negotiations until about 2018 with either delayed or partial independence, and ultimately Scotland remains in the EU, with the EU extracting their pound of flesh from Scotland (no treaty exceptions or rebate allowed) in order to discourage other separatist movements.

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All 28 members have to agree to any of that. The government of Spain made its position very clear yesterday. Scotland would have to apply for membership, in a process that would take years.

 

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Interestingly (was on the morning news), the fact that only *residents* in Scotland can vote in the referendum today causes the absurd situation that:

- Scotsmen living in Germany *can't* vote, and

- Germans living in Scotland *can* vote.

 

Absolutely weird.

 

Absolutely correct. Why should one have a say on the basis of ancestry? That would be Medieval Europe. The concept of citizenship is outdated and should be replaced by residency. That way a Scotsman moving to Germany will loose their Scottish passport and get a new German passport. And vice versa.

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What happens to healthcare? For that reason alone, I think the no will win. It's scary to gamble with that, eh?

 

Scotland already has its own healthcare system.

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All 28 members have to agree to any of that. The government of Spain made its position very clear yesterday. Scotland would have to apply for membership, in a process that would take years.

 

Link

 

But given that Scotland already implicitly complies with EU rules and standards, there would be no extra costs to meeting those standards, so it may pay not to join the EU, but the EFTA like Norway and others. If this can be agreed quickly, it would ease the pain for trade and access to EU markets until a point the country joins the EU proper.

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If the yes votes win, how will that effect Scots living in Europe when they are no longer EU? i.e. work permits, etc.

 

They will have to make appointemnts at their local Ausländerbehörde and get a permit like a non-EU because the natural reaction of Spain will be to show the finger to separatists.

 

 

 

They will be still UK citizens

 

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