Favorite proverbs

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I was looking through some websites for quotes and came across some proverbs from various cultures. My favorites being from the Russians:

 

*Better a dove on the plate than a woodgrouse in the mating place.

 

*A word of kindness is better than a fat pie.

 

*Having a good wife and rich cabbage soup, seek not other things.

 

*Let everyone pick his own nose.

 

*To run away is not glorious, but very healthy.

 

And the Ukranians had a good one:

 

*Love well whip well. :unsure:

 

As well as the Lithuanians:

 

*Offer the lazy an egg, and they'll want you to peel it for them.

 

Feel free to add your own personal favorites.

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My favourite is an old Finnish one: ;)

 

"Never read threads about favourite proverbs they make you forget all the ones you know." Arne Makkanin. 1842

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:D I think we can all learn a lot from these cultural gems. I, for one, never would have realized that a good wife and cabbage soup were all that a man really needs in life.

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"Slap the parents"

(my Ma, when children misbehave in public)

 

"If angry with pig, do not kick his skin, eat him"

(why having a barbeque makes more sense than playing American football)

 

"When in Rome cross the street at your own risk"

(me, from experience)

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I like that Lithuanian one.

 

I also like the Kurdish one, "If you speak the truth, have one foot in the stirrup".

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I finally found the ones I was looking for. Not so much proverbs as sayings (though not sure what the difference is anyway).

 

" A Lithuanian is not worth a cheap slipper." (German saying)

 

"An ass in Germany is a professor in Rome." (German saying)

 

"Did hogs feed here or did Lithuanians have a feast here?" (Traditional Polish saying)

 

I wish we had cool ones like these in English. I would so love to use the saying "A Lithuanian is not worth a cheap slipper" in normal everday discourse.

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"Trust in God, but tie your camel too" an old Sufi proverb. The tying of the camel referring to securing, I assume, rather than desert bondage practices. :unsure:

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Argh. I'm trying to recall a proverb that I remember thinking was very clever at the time I read it. For the life of me I can't remember how it went or what the moral was but it involved a woman having fallen off a cliff who was able to save herself by hanging onto a vine. I remember there being a tiger growling at her from the top of the cliff as well.

 

It had something to do with her choosing to climb up the vine and face the tiger or fall into the abyss but the way I remember it it was a more clever than that. Can anyone else enlighten me?

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Itchy bum at night, smelly finger in morning - heard that at school in the 70's

 

My father taught me to work, he did not teach me to love it - Abraham Lincoln

 

Do not insult the mother aligator until you have crossed the river - Haitan Proverb

 

It isn't the people who make the most noise who do the most work - someone's mother.

 

When in doubt, stick your left out - Henry Cooper

 

"Take what you like," said God, "Take it and pay for it." - Polish proverb

 

I cannot hear what you say, for the tunder of what you are. - Zulu proverb

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Argh. I'm trying to recall a proverb that I remember thinking was very clever at the time I read it. For the life of me I can't remember how it went or what the moral was but it involved a woman having fallen off a cliff who was able to save herself by hanging onto a vine. I remember there being a tiger growling at her from the top of the cliff as well.

 

It had something to do with her choosing to climb up the vine and face the tiger or fall into the abyss but the way I remember it it was a more clever than that. Can anyone else enlighten me?

Hah! My memory has miraculously returned to me. The proverb goes something like this:

 

A woman is chased off a cliff by a ravenous tiger, she is able to save herself by grabbing onto a vine. Faced with the certain death of either battling the ravenous tiger or plummeting into the abyss, the woman plucks a juicy, ripe, red strawberry* off the vine and enjoys it to the fullest.

 

*might have been another berry as I don't think they grow on vines but you get the picture

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"When in Rome cross the street at your own risk"

(me, from experience)

I also have a proverb about crossing the street in Rome.

 

"When in Rome, find a nun and cross the street just behind her." -cinzia

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I think we can all learn a lot from these cultural gems. I, for one, never would have realized that a good wife and cabbage soup were all that a man really needs in life.

i've been saying that for ages but... theres also an old medeival english one i find quiet funny.

 

a woman a dog and a willow need beating time to time to make them grow proper.

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What's the use of being stupid if you don't show it - TV

 

He who doesn't have sense enough to get out of the rain, is a damp fool - Confucius Says

 

You can recognize a bad egg without trying to lay one - TV

 

Dogs chase cars but they can't drive. (dunno where from)

 

If you can't stand the heat get out of the kitchen - TV - The Defender

 

The trouble with politicians is that they get elected - TV

 

Whenever Wall St. sneezes, Europe catches a cold - heard at work

 

Figures don't lie but liars figure - heard at work

 

To win a war without striking a blow is perfection [sun-Tze, 2500 years ago, great Chinese theorist of war].

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Not really a proverb, more of a saying.

 

My dad doesn't hold with cussin'. If somebody makes him mad, he says, "That really chaps my hide."

 

When a rich man does something stupid, he also likes to say, "That guy has more dollars than sense."

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The thing I love the most about some of those first ones I posted is that they make no sense to me. But I'm going to start using them anyway.

 

Somebody will pour their heart out to me some day, and after listening to their story, I'll simply reply, "Well, you know, it's like they always say, 'Love well, whip well.'" and then I'll walk off to let them ponder it for a bit.

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Das letzte Hemd hat keine Taschen.

(The last shirt has no pockets)

:)

 

edit: zwei Doofe, ein Gedanke :lol:

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