Residence and employment visas for Germany

88 posts in this topic

On 04/10/2016, 09:46:32, ilyann said:

 

Well, it's unclear if your friend actually has the permission to sublet or not. If yes, then he can be the formal Wohnungsgeber for the purposes of Bürgeramt and can provide the necessary documents for you (he'll sign as "Hauptmieter" – no documents from your landlord will be required).

 

If not, you can get him into trouble, as you are already living in the apartment without landlords permission. Still, what you actually need is the landlord's permission; then you'll be able to continue your arrangements with paying your friend; a lease from the landlord is not required, but can be done with your friend then.

 

As you are waiting for October 10th anyway, you can book a Termin in the Bürgeramt and wait. 

 

 

I've seen my Landlord and the previous tenant did not pay some rent or get out of the contract properly, so I can't be put on until that is sorted and get my city registration form signed. I'm not sure how long this will take and my Schengen Visa ends middle of November, so I don't have much time. I'm not sure what I can do now, I'm afraid I'll be forced to leave Germany because of this. I've been offered a place at an Air BnB room until February though, but I am not sure how well that will work since I've heard some places are no longer accepting Air BnB registrations anymore. Does anyone here have any experience with this?

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I'm expected to graduate from an IT university in my (non-EU) country sometime during this year. However, I want to move to Germany asap so I'm considering taking an offer for a job as a DPD driver. So suppose I get my work visa, work several months there and then I graduate (I can take care of study completion even if working in Germany, only a few exams left). 

 

My question is: Would I be able to apply for EU Card then with my diploma/degree and upon getting it - leave the current employer and find a job in an IT company? I know the initial work permits are tied to that particular employer, but would I be allowed to leave him once I get the Blue Card?

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New poster here!

My fiancé lives in Berlin and I plan on moving there this spring! We plan on getting married while I'm there as well. I have my "no record certification" saying I'm not married, I'm awaiting a new copy of my birth certificate, and I'll be getting an apostille for both.

My German fiancé has gotten information from other Germans that I need to apply for a spousal/marriage visa to get married, though I can't find any information on the American embassy/consulate websites. Is a spousal/marriage visa a thing? I was under the impression that I can get married while on the "tourist" visa 90-day thing.

Which information is right?!

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10 hours ago, marooples said:

New poster here!

My fiancé lives in Berlin and I plan on moving there this spring! We plan on getting married while I'm there as well. I have my "no record certification" saying I'm not married, I'm awaiting a new copy of my birth certificate, and I'll be getting an apostille for both.

My German fiancé has gotten information from other Germans that I need to apply for a spousal/marriage visa to get married, though I can't find any information on the American embassy/consulate websites. Is a spousal/marriage visa a thing? I was under the impression that I can get married while on the "tourist" visa 90-day thing.

Which information is right?!

I don´t really know the answer but what I understood from reading between the lines of TT postings the marriage visa is needed if you can´t get married within the 90 days you´re allowed to stay visa-free (which is not unlikely, given the bureaucratic requirements like getting apostilled translations etc.).

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Hey all, I'm an Aussie with a German/British/Aussie spouse and a german/aussie son and daughter.

 

I'd like to research two things if possible

 

One is obviously the visa requirements for Germany, I'm not sure who exactly  to contact to get more information I have looked online but I am a bit confused by it all and I would like to know the financial requirement. So if anyone can post an updated list of who to contact regarding this that would be great.

 

I also would like to know who I would contact to find out more about working as a Radiographer in Germany, my husband is a general radiographer, he got his Bachelor in Australia and is now working in the UK as a locum. I am thinking my partner will have to update his qualifications to maybe being a sonographer which he wants anyway.

 

So hopefully someone can link me some websites that I can gain further knowledge as I would prefer to live in Germany as we have a lot of friends and family there.

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16 hours ago, aussiea said:

One is obviously the visa requirements for Germany, I'm not sure who exactly  to contact to get more information I have looked online but I am a bit confused by it all and I would like to know the financial requirement. So if anyone can post an updated list of who to contact regarding this that would be great.

 

If your husband and children are German citizens, assuming they would be moving to Germany too, then AFAIK you'd be eligible to apply for a family reunification visa in the first instance. After some years you'd then be eligible to apply for permanent residency status albeit you'd need to jump through some bureaucratic hoops first, such as achieving a minimum standard of German language fluency and successfully completing a mandatory German integration course (which includes basic knowledge of the constitution and the social, political and legal standards etc.).

 

Financial requirements vary according to individual circumstances but the rule of thumb is that applicants should be self-supporting without the risk of becoming a burden on the German state. That generally translates (eg.for non-EU students) to having a minimum income or savings of ~8.5K € per annum as well as German (or BaFin approved international) health insurance. German health insurance is not cheap but if your spouse were working in a job designated as liable for mandatory social insurance contributions then his public health insurance provider would include coverage of his immediate family too.

 

The law which regulates such matters:  Act on the Residence, Economic Activity and Integration of Foreigners in the Federal Territory (Residence Act)

 

As an Aussie in Oz your first stop for further information should probably be either the German Embassy or your nearest Consulate General, German Missions in Australia, albeit I say that with the caveat German officials working overseas are not infallible and some of their information may not be up-to-date wrt changes in law or even accurate in other aspects.

 

This, Auswärtiges Amt - Federal Foreign Office - Overview :Travel Immigration Residence is the English website of their HQ where, by use of the site search, you may find out about any recent changes in visa or immigration matters

 

16 hours ago, aussiea said:

I also would like to know who I would contact to find out more about working as a Radiographer in Germany, my husband is a general radiographer, he got his Bachelor in Australia and is now working in the UK as a locum. I am thinking my partner will have to update his qualifications to maybe being a sonographer which he wants anyway.

 

Use this link.

Recognition in Germany - Federal Government Web Guide to Obtaining Recognition of Foreign Academic or Vocational Qualifications

NB: Because the rules vary from one Bundesland to another you must start by choosing which state in Germany your husband is hoping to work in and then, using the folllowing website very carefullly (paying close attention to the details whenever they appear in the answer stages), follow the links in the final stage.

 

You should study the German government advice on  Applying for work in Germany - www.arbeitsagentur.de and this link would be a useful one to research and bookmark too.

BERUFENET, Berufsinformationen - Arbeitsagentur (Dept of Labor) Information on all German employment classifications and training

 

HTH

 

2B

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Thanks 2b, I'll have a look at all that, it would only be myself and maybe our youngest who is 15 going to Germany with my husband as my daughter is 21 and does not want to move due to friends in Aus.

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Hey guys, 

 

I'm a long time lurker and first time user (so sorry if I've used this website wrong). I'm not sure where to post this question (I posted this on a different forum but didn't receive a response so this is a copy/paste job), but I'm in a bit of a complicated situation. I've recently received a job offer from a Dutch company looking to expand in Germany. They aren't 100% prepared for employees to start working in Germany, so they need me to work in Amsterdam for 2 months before I start full time in Germany. I know that I have to get a work permit from the Netherlands to do this.  My question is after the 2 months expires and my work is done in the Netherlands, then I would have to get a work Visa from Germany. Is it possible to get a visa in Germany, then go through the Dutch immigration to get a temporary visa? this possible or legal? I don't know if there are any bureaucracy experts out there that could give me insight as to the appropriate/legal steps to take here. I would appreciate any help (even if its just to tell me where I should post this question). 

 

Thanks! 

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Hi everyone,

 

I just signed up to this forum and have been using the search function however, I have not been able to find the exact information I am looking for so I was hoping someone here could answer my questions.

 

My employer is moving me to Germany from Canada. I work for a Canadian company but will be assigned to a project being managed by a German consulting company. My family consists of my wife and 3 children, we are all Canadian citizens. From what I have researched, it is not necessary for Canadians to obtain a work permit / residence permit prior to arriving in Germany. We can enter and stay in Germany for a maximum of 90 days. Our plan is to stay in Germany for 2 - 3 years.

 

Question 1: Is the work permit separate from a residence permit? Or is it the same thing?

Question 2: Can I enter Germany and then apply for a residence permit? 

Question 3: Is my family included in my application for a residence permit or do they have to remain in Canada, or go back to Canada until the residence permit is approved?

Question 4: How long does it typically take for the permit to be processed?

Question 5: I was married outside of Canada and our marriage certificate is in a foreign language. Do I need to get this translated to English first, and then to German? Can the English translation be done by any certified translator or does it have to be notarized as well in the country the marriage took place?

 

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Hi everyone! I am an international (non-EU) graduate student in NRW, and I am graduating in June 2018. I used to intern for a year somewhere and they just contacted saying they'd like to employ me full-time. My question is: Can I change my student residency to work residency (I don't mean permanent, only changing 16§ to 18§) before graduation? Also, which office and who in the Auslanderbehorde can I go to for such questions?? Thanks!

 

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2 hours ago, Zoeys said:

I am an international (non-EU) graduate student in NRW, and I am graduating in June 2018. I used to intern for a year somewhere and they just contacted saying they'd like to employ me full-time. My question is: Can I change my student residency to work residency (I don't mean permanent, only changing 16§ to 18§) before graduation?

 

Yes, it is theoretically possible; however, I would strongly recommend that you don’t attempt this.

 

Have you already worked this year? You are allowed to work 120 days per calendar year, if you have not already worked this year, you should be able to work full-time until you graduate without going over your limit (keep track of exactly how many days you work every week).

 

As soon as you graduate, you can apply for a permit to look for a job under §16 Abs. 5 (it doesn’t matter that you already have a job). This permit allows you to be employed AND/OR self-employed.

 

Once you are secure in your new job, then you can change your permit to one for employment.   

 

Unfortunately, many foreign students change too soon after graduation from § 16 to § 18 and then can’t go back.

 

For example,

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/372741-residence-permit-after-losing-job-in-trial-period/#comment-3597884

 

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6 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

Yes, it is theoretically possible; however, I would strongly recommend that you don’t attempt this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you very much for your response and the link enclosed. Regarding the 120 full-day period international students are permitted to work within, do weekends and holidays count as well? (sorry if this sounds inane!)

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On 1/25/2018, 4:05:28, engelchen said:

 

Yes, it is theoretically possible; however, I would strongly recommend that you don’t attempt this.

 

 

 

Have you already worked this year? You are allowed to work 120 days per calendar year, if you have not already worked this year, you should be able to work full-time until you graduate without going over your limit (keep track of exactly how many days you work every week).

 

 

 

As soon as you graduate, you can apply for a permit to look for a job under §16 Abs. 5 (it doesn’t matter that you already have a job). This permit allows you to be employed AND/OR self-employed.

 

 

 

Once you are secure in your new job, then you can change your permit to one for employment.   

 

 

 

Unfortunately, many foreign students change too soon after graduation from § 16 to § 18 and then can’t go back.

 

 

 

For example,

 

 

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/372741-residence-permit-after-losing-job-in-trial-period/#comment-3597884

 

 

 

 

Hey englechen, 

 

really my first post here so sorry if not in right place. 


Can't tell you how valuable I found your input and advice. I have a question is you don't mind me asking.

 

I'm an non-EU international student who is about to graduate from masters. I will be receiving a full time contract for a 6 month duration (possibly extended for another 6 months), as I gather from your advice, it wouldn't be wise for me to jump fish and apply for a work permit ( or a blue card, if eligible) and rather use my Arbeitsucher visa and work with it.The §16 Abs. 5 states that I can work within this period yet it doesn't specify what kind of work or the duration. To your knowledge is it possible to work full time ? 

and do you think this is the best course of action I have until I find a secure job ? 

 

Any help is more than appreciated. Thanks !

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On 25.1.2018, 22:59:28, Zoeys said:

Regarding the 120 full-day period international students are permitted to work within, do weekends and holidays count as well? (sorry if this sounds inane!)

 

Only days the days that you actually work as well as the days that you get paid without having to work (paid holidays, sick days etc.). 

 

For example, if you have an office job where you don't work weekends, then they don't count.

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On 31.1.2018, 20:01:14, aziade said:

I'm an non-EU international student who is about to graduate from masters. I will be receiving a full time contract for a 6 month duration (possibly extended for another 6 months), as I gather from your advice, it wouldn't be wise for me to jump fish and apply for a work permit ( or a blue card, if eligible) and rather use my Arbeitsucher visa and work with it.The §16 Abs. 5 states that I can work within this period yet it doesn't specify what kind of work or the duration. To your knowledge is it possible to work full time ? 

and do you think this is the best course of action I have until I find a secure job ?

 

Yes, you can work full-time with a permit under §16 Abs. 5. You can even be self-employed (from an immigration law standpoint, however, you still need to follow the rules for the Finanzamt, Gewerbeamt, etc.).

 

You just need to make sure that you find a proper job before your 18 months run out.

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Hi people of Toytown Germany!

 

My question is:

 

When you have graduated from your German university, and have started working as a freelancer, which means you have changed your student visa to freelance visa, is it possible at all to go back to a student visa again, if you decide to go back to college and have a letter of acceptance from a German uni? (without having to leave Germany, and start the student visa process all over again in the German embassy of your passport country).

Or

Is it possible to enroll at your university and study full-time on a freelance visa while also working as a freelancer?

P.S non-EU citizen here!

 

Thanks!

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> Is it possible to enroll at your university and study full-time on a freelance visa while also working as a freelancer?

 

Yes, any resident has the right to study whatever they want, so as long as your freelancing continues as your "main" activity, you don't need to change the visa.

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Hi this is my first time writing here. Not sure if I’m in the write space. 

 

So, I’m an American Citizen, living still in the states. I have been offered a letter of intent to teach English near Munich. My question is, has anyone here applied for the work/residence visa from the USA? If so, were you able to open a German bank account from the states, what type of health insurance do you recommend, and how did you go about registering your address not physically being in Germany yet. It seems almost impossible as all these major factors have to be done in Germany. 

 

 

I’m losing my mind. 

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Is this for a position as a employee? If so, the employer has to request the visa for you. Yoru employer should also be willing to help you address these issues.

 

If you will be an employee, in all likelihood, you will automatically have to join the public health insurance system. 

 

If you will not be an employee, it's more complex. Can you clarify whether you'd be an employee or a freelancer? 

 

See if your US bank does business in Germany so you can have an account through them since not all German-based banks will allow a US citizen to open a bank account (use the search function- forum member Starshollow started a thread on this recently, IIRC). 

 

You can't register your address before you get here, but if you need a freelance visa, you can apply for that from Germany (although you'd need more than one language school to give you a letter of intent). As a freelancer who's coming from the US and hasn't been in an EU public health insurance system, you'd need private health insurance (contact Starshollow or john g about that). 

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If it´s on a freelance basis, you must have at least 2 letters of intent ie from at least two language schools.

As an American, you can also come to Germany and apply for the visa there and  can only register there.

Health insurance: if on a freelance basis, you cannot get public insurance - it has to be a private solution. Just contact one of Toytown´s insurance brokers for help - that bit can be sorted out to save you the stress of trying to find your own solution.

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