German words you learnt but never used

96 posts in this topic

die Parte - the name for the 'bitter end' of a piece of rope i.e. the end left over when a rope is passed around a bitt to secure it.

 

Had to translate it into English once - and because the dictionaries don't know it we spent half a day chasing the word round the Internet trying to find a definition/translation - but I've never needed it in German.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liebling

 

My husband does not like the sound of it...and I speak English to our son.

Mrs Tom 34

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Dudelsack.

 

Just doesn't come up in conversation, for some reason.

It does if you're Irish (or Scottish, no doubt), alala, and you get into a conversation about music

 

My word is: Puffmais

 

I learnt it in school but have never met a German who actually uses it.

 

Every German I've ever asked uses ... (wait for it...) Popcorn

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the way they end things with "Oder?" I do it all the time- except I've also adapted it to English, ending sentence with, "Or?"

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I love the way they end things with "Oder?" I do it all the time- except I've also adapted it to English, ending sentence with, "Or?"

I like it now too, but it took some time. As an American to here 'oder' at the end of a sentence struck me as insecurity, uncertainty. But now I use it too. When in Rome….

The Canadians with their 'ay' have a close match. Oder?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YEAH, I know- it used to bother me a lot when I first got here, like you've just disqualified everything you've just said by adding a touch of uncertainty at the end. :D Oder? ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brötchen

 

I've only lived in Bavaria here. The one time I said it I got such a weird stare. the bakery woman had no idea what the hell I was talking about. I watched other customers and listened as they ordered and figured out "Semmel" real fast. Hunger helps you learn fast.

 

woof.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wichser.

 

Fantastic word. Easily used in any region of Germany and gets the point across. :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@BadDoggie - I am surprised that you seem to expect a Brötchen or Semmel in your food bowl.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised that he's allowed inside the bakery. ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumors have it that a quarter of all users on the Internet are dogs. Nevertheless I agree that it's very unusual to have one ordering stuff in a real bakery.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GAFFEL

My brother was visiting me here in Munich. While out shopping he wanted to buy a paar Wiener from a takeaway. As the lady behind the counter was getting his order ready my brother (Who wanted to practice his German) turned to me and said “Gaffel is German for Fork, right

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eiskunstlaufeuropameisterschaften - Not a great fan of the "sport".

 

Geschwindigkeitsüberschreitung - Never been caught. :ph34r:

 

Gradierwerk - As you can tell, German lessons at English schools really prepare you for the (sur)real world!

 

Nanu - Mork! Only old ladies from Northern Germany say nanu (in my experience, anyway)!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Brötchen

 

I've only lived in Bavaria here. The one time I said it I got such a weird stare. the bakery woman had no idea what the hell I was talking about.

Oh she knew what you were talking about alright, she just hates Prussians by the sounds of it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Schadenfreude - i think that's how you spell it, means to laugh at someones misfortunes. I always thought it was a cool word but never used it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft

:

 

The association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services.

 

Never really had need for it up here.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now