Eczema treatments for children

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My toddler has Eczema on his elbows and on his legs. I tried various ointments and eucerin and it doesn't seem to help. It goes away keeps coming back. Can anyone have any tips or suggestions what shd I use, and what not do...

 

Many Thanks

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Has your toddler seen an allergist? It could be a simple fod intolerance or an allergy to cleaning products or synthetic materials. Worth investigating anyway.

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There was a big thread in Misc and Random Chat once about this. I'll see if I can get Editor Bob to revive it for you. Lots of good advice, although it was meant for adults.

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Yes I had been to the Dr and he said, when he get older it eventually goes away.

no, I actually meant a specialist allergist who can track common allergies an intolerances using patches. Most general doctors do not take allergy seriously especially when the reation is not severe as in the case of eczema.

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With a toddler they might more likely do a blood test for food allergies first.

 

My baby also has a little eczema due to sensitive skin (she tested negative for food allergies with a blood test.) The doctor prescribed a hydrocortisone cream for limited use when it's acute, and then we have to use Eucerin regularly to keep it away.

 

The way the doctor described it, it's best to get on top of the immediate problem and get rid of the rash with the hydrocortisone before using the other creams.

 

I'd get a different opinion, if I were you. I wouldn't consider "it will go away eventually" to be an acceptable treatment for my child, even if it's true.

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My baby also has a little eczema due to sensitive skin (she tested negative for food allergies with a blood test.) The doctor prescribed a hydrocortisone cream for limited use when it's acute, and then we have to use Eucerin regularly to keep it away.

Seconded. We received identical advice when one of our children had this problem a couple of years ago.

By the way, it has disappeared since (the eczema, not the advice :D ).

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(my post didnt go thru..so ill try again)I tried everything back home (usa) and nothing worked on my skin, but when i was in the uk, i tried e45 cream (just a normal over the counter cream everyone uses there) and it worked wonders.. you should give it a try if you havent

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The doctor prescribed a hydrocortisone cream for limited use when it's acute, and then we have to use Eucerin regularly to keep it away.

Thirded. This is exactly the course of treatment that my father prescribed for my nephew. It can be a lotion other than Eucerin like Curel or some other non greasy hydrating lotion, but this is exactly the way to do it.

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Hi there

 

I have a daughter who is now almost seven and she has had eczema on the inside of her elbows and behind her knees for as long as I can remember.

 

I have tried every cream you can imagine and have found that nothing actually works at all. I have found ointments (oily ointment or salf) to be the best bet as creams seem to make the itch worse and sometimes redden which is terrible for the kids. I have cream sent over from South Africa called Anitpeol cream which is actually used for bad nappy rash in SA - dont know if you can get an equivalent over here. I also use - but very seldom and in extreme case where her eczema gets very bad- a mild cortizone based cream used to relieve insect bites. Now I realise that cortizone has side effects - trust me I have read every book and consulted every Dr re this - but the strength I use and the amount of times I use it on her are not likely to negatively affect her. This usually clears up the eczema in a day or two but as I said I only use this in extreme cases. I would recommed applying the oily ointment even when the eczema is not flared up as it is a viscious cycle - if the skin dries even slightly the itchiness returns, then the scratching and then of course it is hard to get the skin back to normal again.

 

I have also found that bubble baths are to be avoided when the eczema is bad and also switched to using sensitive washing liquid etc. Also watch the bath temperatures - hot baths dry out the skin. I even bath her every second day and rather let her shower the alternate day and that seems to work too. I have also been told that the sun us bad for eczema but have not found this to be the case - it is actually better after slight sun exposure. Chlorine from pools worsens it - probably due to drying the skin out. Tight clothing on the arms - long sleeve shirts in winter - seem to worsen the eczema too.

 

I have been told that it should clear up as she gets older - and that this usually clears before puberty (not sure why).

 

Will post if I can think of anything else...

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My little girl is 3, has exactly the same thing as your boy...I'm not sure it is actually eczema or whatever..but the doctor I went to - ask me to get Bedan, which I have to say is very good, I think it relieves the itching if anything. I think it looks worse than it actually is (I guess you have to keep that in mind). I'd say the hotter weather set my daughter off again, she does not get it in winter?? plus I used a different washing powder and since then I've not been able to get rid of it?? I think once you set it off it takes ages to shift !!! weird I know!! I've decided not using bubble bath has immediate effect lately. BEDAN also has a lotion for the bath, which is great, it leaves a film on the skin and vertually clears it up.

 

Hope this helps. ;)

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I even bath her every second day and rather let her shower the alternate day and that seems to work too.

Does your daughter actually get that dirty that she needs to bathe or shower every day? That's very drying to the skin too. I'd let her get grubby for a day or two. if she hadn't been playing in mud puddles.

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I agree with showem that infrequent bathing or spot baths just to get the dirt off is helpful.

 

My daughter doesn't get a bath more than twice a week, which really helps since her skin is worse the day after a bath. She's not even crawling yet, though, so she doesn't get that dirty yet.

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I used to suffer really badly as a child, so bad I was regularly hospitalised with it. My eldest son also suffered really badly with it, and although it does tend to disappear as they get older, he still gets the occasional break out.

 

Although hydrocortisone is good, use it only sparingly as it thins the skin if used too much and too often in same place. I never used soap or any form of shower/bath product with Alex, I used Emulsifying ointment, it's in a big white tub of gunky stuff but you use it just like you would soap, I would then cream him all over with aqueous cream. It is important to keep the skin moist and not let it dry out even when not having an outbreak. Always use the cream after a bath or shower and at least again at some other point during the day. Alex to this day still creams after every shower and sometimes an additional time of day. It sounds a bit of a hassle but one they get in the habit it becomes natural and they do it as a matter of course. Even if Alex has a shower the night before, he will cream himself and then do it again when he gets up in the morning.

 

When they are young and it is still bad, try to only use cotton clothes, bed linen etc and try and use a soap powder for sensitive skin. You can try your own tests, avoid dairy products for a while and see if the flare ups are less, also do the same with acidic food products. I used to have to dust and clean alex's room twice a day as dust is also a trigger for a flare up. You could also try the anti-allergen bed linen and mattress protector.

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Does your daughter actually get that dirty that she needs to bathe or shower every day? That's very drying to the skin too. I'd let her get grubby for a day or two. if she hadn't been playing in mud puddles.

This is how I was raised.

 

She has baby oil in her bath as well which obviously helps keep her skin moisturised.

 

Anyway the other thing I thought of was that eczema seems irritated when kids wear woolen or fluffy jerseys or long sleeve shirts, also holding very fluffy toys and sometimes cats, dogs and horses seem to irritate the eczema too. This is just what I have noted.

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I'd say the hotter weather set my daughter off again, she does not get it in winter??

I think it is the sweat that causes the eczema to itch and not the sun. Perspiring whilst sleeping aggravates it more than anything.

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She has baby oil in her bath as well which obviously helps keep her skin moisturised

If using baby oil though, it's always worth checking that there isn't an allergy to lanolin. Unfortunately, lots of products used to treat eczema have lanolin in them, however, this can also be a skin irritant to quite a lot of eczema sufferers and it is sometimes best to avoid using creams or lotions containing lanolin.

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Meyermunich, you might have been raised that way, but you don't have eczema either. I'm not telling you how to raise your child, but pointing out that it could be aggravating the problem.

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I have a daughter who has had eczema for nearly seven years now - I might not have added that I have it 99% under control - and I believe it is due to the advice I have given above. Bathing her does not aggrevate the problem due to the fact that she is a very 'hot' child and sweats during the evening whilst sleeping - this aggrevates the problem more than washing the sweat off. I have obviously taken close notice of what aggrevates the eczema and when and have tried the not bathing for two or three days thing but it had a negative and not a positive effect. The water here in Munich has no chlorine as far as I know and if the water is kept luke warm it does not have much of a drying out effect as far as I have seen. The baby oil provides overall mositurising which helps keep the dryness and therefore itchiness at bay. I am not saying you should or shouldnt bath your child every day but dont believe I should stop doing so if I find there is no negative effect on the eczema. I agree wth the lanolin advice as well - creams that contain it definitely aggrevate the eczema.

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