Warning to all eDonkey file-sharing users

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That accounting only works if the same number of people who want the music for free would pay the .20 cents for the song. I doubt that is the case. In fact run a small experiment. Burn a song that you own a copyright to on 100 cds. Go down to the Stacchus U-Bahn/S-Bahn station and see how long it takes you to give away these cd's and pay attention to how many people you offer and how many accept. Now do the same but charge the 1.20 (the cost of the cd, wear on your cd burner, time for you to invest to burn it and the 20 cents cost of the music). See how many people you offer it to and how many you sell. I bet they won't be similar. In fact, I would assume that most people will toss the free copy in the bin as soon as they turn the corner.

 

So of those million of downloaders, if they were forced to purchase the music, it might end up being only 5,000 sales. But, the word of mouth from these people, who are probably more into the music scene than their peers and are then considered the opinion leaders, will also be reduced. Where upon their recommendations 25,000 more people would have purchased the CDs, thus resulting in a net loss for the record industry or 15*25,000=375,000.

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Fine - but I'm sure there are a lot of people with the mentality of 'it was OK then, so it's OK now'.

 

But regardless of anything else - I think that a lot of this goes back to the industries for demonising the internet instead of trying to work with it in the early days. Now the recognition has become somewhat grudging, but the way they distribute music is still so disjointed and expensive that people will still download music illegally until they get their shit in order.

 

I firmly believe that if you only have to pay - say €2 for a full album, in a format of your choice (without having to download that iPod shit) then most people will pay it, rather than risk the consequences of illegal downloads.

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But, the word of mouth from these people, who are probably more into the music scene than their peers and are then considered the opinion leaders, will also be reduced.

this is an unquantifiable factor, although a relevant arguement for new and up and coming bands who may now chose to market themselves. still a 375.000 loss is still a loss, and you can see why the finance people and lawywers are doning a dicky fit about it.

 

it doesnt matter how cheap it becomes there are still lpeople who will spend all night searching the web to download something for free.

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Hold on, noone has a legal entitlement to recoup their investment, particularly if they keep making the same investment decisions that might have worked in the past, despite the conditions changing.

 

Its like the horse-cart makers trying to make the car illegal, or forcing petrol to be priced in a way that horse travel was still cost effective, because they stupidly invested so much money in a new factory thinking the car was just a fad and felt entitled to see a return on their stupid investment.

 

Look, nowdays it costs next to nothing to distribute a song, so thats what the price should be.

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Hold on, noone has a legal entitlement to recoup their investment, particularly if they keep making the same investment decisions that might have worked in the past, despite the conditions changing.

your right noone has a legal right ro get adequate roi. but no-one has a right to break the law and steal something because they do not agree with the priceing structures set up be the legal owners of something.

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The Swedish police's homepage crashed on Thursday evening, following a major attack. Police say they do not know whether the attack was revenge for the raid on file sharing site The Pirate Bay.

 

The site, www.polisen.se crashed after receiving around half a million page requests a second. Police IT director Lars Lindahl told The Local that the problem was caused by a distributed denial of service attack. He said that investigators had not made a positive link to The Pirate Bay case:

Read more here

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Of course I completely condemn hackers and virus-spreaders but, well, this is just a little bit cool.

 

Does anyone know how I can infect my computer with this particular virus? :blink:

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And as Predicted...

When will these feckers (MPAA/RIAA) Ever learn..

/me goes off to listen to some chumbawumba/tubthumping... (I Get knocked down, but I get up again.. You ain't never gonna keep me down) :D

 

 

The Pirate Bay is back online, operating for now as "The Police Bay." Writes one anonymous submitter: "Pirate Bay got new hardware, moved the servers abroad and used recent backups. So the only bad side-effect of this police raid is that hundreds of clients of the ISP PRQ still have not got their servers back from the police. When the police did the raid on Wednesday, they took Pirate Bay from Bankgirot's secure server room. Then they also took all the servers in PRQ colocation facility STH3, effectively disabling a lot of small companies. The connection between PRQ and TPB? - Same owners, nothing more, this is beginning to become a huge scandal in Sweden with coverage on TV and all newspapers 4 days in a row."

Full Story

 

In Other news, it has been discovered that the MPAA/RIAA contacted the Swedish Govt. to try to get PB taken down, and when they were informed

that PB was doing nothing illegal under Swedish law, the RIAA/MPAA went full force directly to the chief of the federal police and the local district

attorney. They both caved to pressure, even knowing and stating that PB was doing nothing illegal. An investigation by the Govt. into the matter

will begin soon, as they aren’t to impressed that these US groups have directly interfered with Swedish law..

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Also making news, the US Govt. (Via the RIAA/MPAA) is telling Russia, that they gotta shutdown/Raid AllofMP3

if they want to join the WTO.. Org Story Here :o WTF is going on here...

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Yet another Story. The other 200 Customers who had there servers confiscated, and had nothing to

do with PB, can and prob. will also be suing the Govt. for Compensation. During the raid police

took ALL the servers in the datacenter, not just those of PB. This action has forced many legit companies

to loose their web and email presence, thus affecting business...

 

 

The Pirate Bay Threatens Compensation Claim

 

Sweden's self confessed daddy of BitTorrent has revealed that if the findings of an ongoing legal fiasco deem The Pirate Bay

legal, the site's owners can claim compensation from the Swedish state.

 

The popular tracker claims to have not been breaking any of Sweden's laws before it was subject to raids on Thursday by the

Swedish police force. Hackers retaliated by attacking the Swedish police website with a denial of service (DoS) attack a day later.

 

The hackers also unleashed their anger on Sony BMG and Warner Music's regional sites, allies to anti-filesharing devotees such as

the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

 

Despite Sweden's anti-filesharing group Antipiratbyran being accused of misleading the police, a Swedish legal expert has deemed

the site's threat of compensation as being "silly".

 

Regardless, it seems it's back to business as usual at The Pirate Bay.

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The Pirate Party Comes to the US...

 

"Wired news has published an interview with the Pirate Party of the U.S., which was formed a week after the raid on Pirate Bay. The group patterns itself after Piratpartiet, the Swedish political party associated with The Pirate Bay, and says it wants to reform intellectual property and privacy laws."
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I thought this was about copyright infringements? The whole p2p is just another way of doing this. So far as i know making mp3 from purchased CD's is also illegal, does it not say on every CD that it should not be copied? So far as i know that makes and mp3 that you have on your harddrive that is not bought as an mp3 illegal, wether you own a copy of it in timbuktu or not.

 

just a thought.

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Of course this is all about copyright infringement. Making mp3s from purchased cds is not, in most countries with fair use provisions like germany, illegal, otherwise how are people supposed to use mp3 players? It may be illegal in the USA due to the DMCA but noone knows for sure as the whole thing is a messy grey area.

 

And regarding the last bit, no having mp3s on your hard drive wont neccesarily be illegal, in some cases it would be illegal even if you bought it, say you might have bought it legitimatly from a site somewhere and then all of a sudden the riaa declares the site illegal and your mp3s therefore illegal.

 

If you have bought a CD of some music overseas and copied it onto mp3s you should be allowed to possess those mp3s even if you dont have the CD. Whether people are guilty until proven innocent (by producing the cd) or innocent until proven guilty (the riaa or equivalent proving you dont in fact own the cd) is something I am unsure about. I suspect the plaintiffs in such cases know they dont have a chance of being able to do the latter so thats probably why most cases were settled, because they knew they couldnt win in court.

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I thought this was about copyright infringements? The whole p2p is just another way of doing this. So far as i know making mp3 from purchased CD's is also illegal, does it not say on every CD that it should not be copied? So far as i know that makes and mp3 that you have on your harddrive that is not bought as an mp3 illegal, wether you own a copy of it in timbuktu or not.

 

just a thought.

So despite the fact I've paid the rights to the song, I'm not allowed to put it in the format that I want??

 

No wonder nobody respects the law...

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does it not say on every CD that it should not be copied?

Tough shit. The record companies have received concessions from most countries claiming blanks were mostly used for copying music -- utter bullshit in my company which burns thousands of data CDs a week. As long as those whores are collecting money for every single blank disc and cassette sold in a country because I might burn music on them, then I am allowed to do so for myself. They have already been paid their percentage.

 

woof.

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So despite the fact I've paid the rights to the song, I'm not allowed to put it in the format that I want??

 

No wonder nobody respects the law...

yes but are you buying the rights to the song or the rights to play this CD? the whole thing is a mix up in my eyes.

 

 

If you have bought a CD of some music overseas and copied it onto mp3s you should be allowed to possess those mp3s even if you dont have the CD.

How can you prove this? that means every foreigner in Germany can say 'ive got the CD back home'

 

anyone got a link or two to sites with copyright info? would be good to read them through.

 

I have found this

 

 

So gilt in Deutschland seit dem 13. September 2003 das neue Urheberrecht.

Es wurde erweitert um das "Gesetz zur Regelung des Urheberrechts in der Informationsgesellschaft":

 

Strafbar macht sich wer - ganz gleich ob gewerblich oder privat, entgeltlich oder unentgeltlich Daten - wie Musik, Filme, Software oder Computerspiele - im Internet zum Download anbietet und verbreitet, ohne hierzu berechtigt zu sein.

 

Das Knacken oder Umgehen eines Kopierschutzes (z.B. von PC-Spielen, Musik-CDs oder Video-DVDs) ist verboten. Das gilt auch für private Kopien für den eigenen Gebrauch oder den engsten Familien- und Freundeskreis. Wer trotzdem einen Kopierschutz umgeht, macht sich laut Gesetz zwar nicht strafbar, muss aber mit Schadensersatzforderungen der Rechte-Inhaber rechnen.

 

"Anti-Kopierschutz"-Programme oder -Geräte dürfen laut Gesetz nicht mehr verkauft werden.

 

Auch dürfen keine Privatkopien aus "offensichtlich illegalen Quellen" angefertigt werden. Damit sind vor allem Tauschbörsen und Peer-to-Peer-Dienste (wie eDonkey, Morpheus oder KaZaA) im Internet gemeint, die zig-tausendfach Musik- und Filmtitel und Software zum kostenlosen Download anbieten.

quelle http://www.www-kurs.de/urheber.htm

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How can you prove this? that means every foreigner in Germany can say 'ive got the CD back home'

Exactly the burden of proof is really on the prosecution to prove the guilt of the defendant by establishing that the defendant does not in fact own the CD which is next to impossible. Thats why the court hardly ever sees such trials. The RIAA etc has up till now only been trying to prosecute people who share such material on the internet, rather than merely possessing mp3s or cds on hard drive, as far as I know.

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the third paragraph above from me is interesting, it means you cant copy a CD if it is copy protected. Its against the law and you could pay damages to the owners.

 

So if this is true no more copying CD for your mp3 player if they are copy protected.

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