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garden lawns are bad

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22 hours ago, emkay said:

 

A few of our neighbours get their lawns completely replaced every 1-2 years! I’m glad though that many German councils have banned stone gardens. 

 

I had heard that there were proposals to ban people paving their front or side garden to have extra parking spaces as this was increasing the risk of flooding. I'm surprised though that rockeries are being banned though, surely you still get the rainwater getting absorbed into the ground with this type of garden (or part of garden)? My parents had one and there were always really nice plants growing there.

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I'm likely an outlier on the lawn preferences as I prefer a well groomed yard.  This is part of my 200 square meter yard and it is a joy for me to maintain.  The Hunter irrigation system fed by a well makes watering easy with no burden on the municipal water system.  I use the scarifier on it twice a year, and mow once a week during the summer months.  Keeping the grass at about three centimeters does a good job of controlling the weeds, but I still pull a few by hand when I see them.

 

House-Garden-L.jpg.de88c62f2da49d663db9e

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Using a well makes it more of a personal preference since water is not being wasted, and when your new garden is a few more seasons old, those shrubs and trees will give it much more wildlife appeal, but you have a built in advantage with the shrubbery over the fence.

 

I really like your wall - it's a thing of beauty and a great habitat.

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On 4/30/2022, 5:33:00, JG52 said:

The Hunter irrigation system fed by a well makes watering easy with no burden on the municipal water system.

Can you please elaborate on your irrigation well ?

I've been considering drilling a well too.

Right now I use rainwater: 200 m2 of total roof area (including garage and patio), and 3 m3 of storage, but during the summer my veg need even more.

For drilling the well, I would have to invest in the drilling stuff etc, I don't mind the hard work myself (I actually love it) but I'm cheap and I'm still put off by the initial cost. Plus, it could well happen that sooner or later the well gets clogged...

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4 hours ago, Gambatte said:

Can you please elaborate on your irrigation well ?

I've been considering drilling a well too.

Right now I use rainwater: 200 m2 of total roof area (including garage and patio), and 3 m3 of storage, but during the summer my veg need even more.

For drilling the well, I would have to invest in the drilling stuff etc, I don't mind the hard work myself (I actually love it) but I'm cheap and I'm still put off by the initial cost. Plus, it could well happen that sooner or later the well gets clogged...

 

My well is only nine meters below grade, but I would never invest in the equipment to sink one myself.  I don't know what the cost of the well was since it was bundled in the total garden job, but the pump was about €800 and the pump controller was another €110.  The pump controller senses the immediate demand, such as a faucet or a irrigation zone valve opening, and turns on the pump.  When the water flow stops, the pump controller turns off the pump.

 

Unless you have drilled a well before, it is a job that is best left to the professionals, especially if you don't know where the water table is on your property.  You must have the drilling equipment, casings for the bore, well head, PVC pipe, and electrical connection to power the well.  I've contracted to have five wells drilled for the properties I owned in the States and would never do this on my own.  The kit tends to be a one-trick pony and is a considerable investment.

 

 

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1 hour ago, JG52 said:


My well is only nine meters below grade, .

Thanks.

Do I assume correctly that the pump is at ground level, and not down the well? Both types exist, and you don't specify...

If yes, then of course, because of physics, the well cannot be deeper than ca 9m.

It works like this: the pump sucks air away. So the water is pushed by the pressure of air on the other side. And air pressure happens to be equivalent to ca 10m of water height, make it 9m with loss. Therefore a pump at ground level cannot pump up water that is deeper than ca 9m. Even if you build it "better", you just can't beat physics.

Of course a pump could push water up (push, not suck), any height, if the pump was underneath .

 

I'm surprised your pump costed this much, most garden pumps like mine that sits at ground level (and can suck water max 9m) cost 50-100€.

I use my pump to move water horizontally, from the tanks near the house to the veg raised bed with perlschlauch at the far end of the garden.

 

Thanks for the advice. A friend of mine (hands-on young sporty engineer) did drill his well on his own, hard physical work and need the right tool (I think it's called Auger, which again if you are a physicist makes you think of something else, but never mind...), but otherwise he says easy job. Pity he ran out of water after 1yr🤣😑😲.

I haven't tried yet but I'm tempted, now still searching for the final bit of motivation...

 

Happy gardening 🌻

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Technically, you need a permit to drill a well. 

 

A vague inquiry at the Untere Wasserbehörde in our district yielded the info that the permit will not be granted unless the garden is adjacent to a house or for commercial farming.  What I did find out is that it can vary by district.  A larger well drilling company will always require a permit and well offer to apply for it as well. This can come back and bite you if the permit is denied.  A one or two man outfit probably might not ask too many questions.  

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3 hours ago, Gambatte said:

Thanks.

Do I assume correctly that the pump is at ground level, and not down the well? Both types exist, and you don't specify...

If yes, then of course, because of physics, the well cannot be deeper than ca 9m.

It works like this: the pump sucks air away. So the water is pushed by the pressure of air on the other side. And air pressure happens to be equivalent to ca 10m of water height, make it 9m with loss. Therefore a pump at ground level cannot pump up water that is deeper than ca 9m. Even if you build it "better", you just can't beat physics.

Of course a pump could push water up (push, not suck), any height, if the pump was underneath .

 

I'm surprised your pump costed this much, most garden pumps like mine that sits at ground level (and can suck water max 9m) cost 50-100€.

I use my pump to move water horizontally, from the tanks near the house to the veg raised bed with perlschlauch at the far end of the garden.

 

Thanks for the advice. A friend of mine (hands-on young sporty engineer) did drill his well on his own, hard physical work and need the right tool (I think it's called Auger, which again if you are a physicist makes you think of something else, but never mind...), but otherwise he says easy job. Pity he ran out of water after 1yr🤣😑😲.

I haven't tried yet but I'm tempted, now still searching for the final bit of motivation...

 

Happy gardening 🌻

 

My pump is submersed and it is the Grundfos SQ 3-40.  It can deliver 3 cubic meters (3,000 liters) of water per hour (50 liters per minute) at a pressure of 15 bar continuously up to a depth of 42 meters.  This is why it costs more than the surface garden pump. :D

 

The shallowest well on my properties in the States was 145 feet and the deepest was 460 feet.  There is an art to sinking a well in a viable aquifer, and that is why I use the professionals instead of doing it myself.  My well has been going strong for over 11 years, so I'm satisfied the guy who drilled it knew what he was doing.

 

 

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Wow, you opted for a Rolls-Royce of garden well. Well done!

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4 hours ago, Gambatte said:

Wow, you opted for a Rolls-Royce of garden well. Well done!

 

Not really, it's just a well.  The magic is in the irrigation system consisting of the controller, weather sensor, valves, valve manifold, retracting rotator heads, drip lines, and zone layout.  All the pump does is provide a steady source of water at pressure and on demand to the valve manifold.

 

You can find less expensive submersible pumps at Bauhaus, Toom, or Hornbach.  However, the devil is in the details and you must compare the specifications on head pressure, maximum depth, flow rate, run time, duty cycle, construction material (how much is plastic?), and manufacturer's warranty.  Some of the less expensive submersible pumps are not as tolerant to cycling on and off frequently as the more expensive models.  They might struggle to supply a large irrigation system that does not use a large pressure tank, as a residential unit for domestic water would use.

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