Habeck claims anyone could quite easily use 10% less energy

575 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

I still feel the general solution for charging cars, especially for people without garage, is to charge at work.

 

I noticed our local Aldi installed a charging point. The roof of the building is completely covered in solar panels. Just counting x and y, there were around 600 panels, so I am guessing they generate a fair amount of power. Googling charges around Munich I see there are a few chargers at Aldi supermarkets.

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On 8/21/2022, 10:00:19, mtbiking said:

If I get offers I’ll write you (Gambatte), if that’s OK. 

Yes, very happy if you write to me.

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I was not sure what the best thread for this info was, I assume this is now the "Energy Crisis thread".

 

I heard this morning in the radio that due to the current energy crisis the government is thinking in bringing back the mandatory home office when possible regulations starting in October.

 

Edit: Here a link about it:  https://www.tagesschau.de/inland/innenpolitik/corona-homeoffice-pflicht-101.html

 

But that link says it is because of Covid.  

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42 minutes ago, Fietsrad said:

The Deutsche Bahn could save a lot of energy by turning off outside lights on sunny days.

Many places could.  I have friends who use high energy halogen ones because they prefer them.  Is that still a thing?

 

I guess for DB, lighting is a teeny tiny percentage of their electricity bill.  However, not really an excuse.  But in the UK cheap gas made insulating houses and alternative power "uneconomic".   Which was so !"§$ing short sighted.

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3 hours ago, Krieg said:

I was not sure what the best thread for this info was, I assume this is now the "Energy Crisis thread".

 

I heard this morning in the radio that due to the current energy crisis the government is thinking in bringing back the mandatory home office when possible regulations starting in October.

 

Edit: Here a link about it:  https://www.tagesschau.de/inland/innenpolitik/corona-homeoffice-pflicht-101.html

 

But that link says it is because of Covid.  

 

Seems strange to me, if people are staying home, then we will all have the heating on, if people to go the office, most peoples home heating can be turned off. 

 

I would think that heating an office with many people in it, uses less power than heating lots of homes.

 

But it seem to make sense to have home office because COVID, because you want to separate people.

 

COVID and saving energy measures seems to lead to 2 opposites strategy 

 

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I often rocked up the my children's schools and found it roasting.  Radiators turned up full.  Windows opened to cool down.   I hope the price hike encourages less reckless use.  We are lucky.  We could buy somewhere with good insulation.   Only room we heat is the living room (radiator at 3).  And the bathroom a bit because is dries the towels.   Not heated any other rooms for 15 years.  But of course many say that it does not work.  Causes damp problems.  I air house in winter for 10 minutes in the morning.  Windows mad open.  Heat returns quickly.  From the walls and such.

 

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1 hour ago, yesterday said:

Seems strange to me, if people are staying home, then we will all have the heating on, if people to go the office, most peoples home heating can be turned off. 

 

You are forgetting that one may be staying at home while the other goes to the office.

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22 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

You are forgetting that one may be staying at home while the other goes to the office.

I did try and cover that when I said " most peoples. home heating can be turned off.  ". I did not say all people, but trying to estimate the exact percentage is hard :wub:

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What a load of codswollop, turning the lights out or slightly lowering the temperatures or keeping the doors closed is just a bit of feel-good activism for the voting plebs.

Germany alone uses around 4 Petajoule of energy each and every year, (the US uses around 6 Petajoule.) The main consumers are the chemical industry, followed by the metal industry, next down the list is the fossil fuel industry, then glass, ceramics and stone stuff, then paper and stuff made from paper and the food industry.

Does anybody really think that turning the lights out at the library after 22:00 is going to make a dent?

 

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People going to their workplace needs energy for their transportation.  

 

And most people do not switch off their heating then they leave the house.  Actually switching it off might not be a good thing.

 

And if you stay at home you might skip one or two showers.

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They had it right 1973, car-free Sundays. Reduced maximum speed limits etc usw. Those measures were accepted then, they could be used again. Anyone old enough to remember that time?

..

Many people really do not care about wasting energy/cash, their own or their employer's.

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I'd forgotten that the only reason my then-husband agreed to a (used) Kinderwagen for Vierling, born in July 1973, was the energy crisis. Vierling and I put a lot of kilometers on that baby-buggy.

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@FietsradI remember it well. Here in Sweden the shop windows were dark and every other streetlight turned off. We were also hammered with the slogan "let empty rooms be dark rooms", which I've actually adhered to ever since, and it's resulted in arguments with my otherwise very green sister.:P

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3 minutes ago, Elljay said:

 "let empty rooms be dark rooms", which I've actually adhered to ever since

Me too! And it still makes sense. It may not make a bit of difference in the greater scheme of things, but the accumulated savings through the year makes a big difference in my utilities bill.

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9 hours ago, Krieg said:

People going to their workplace needs energy for their transportation.  

 

That would be the real saving, though presumably as in the lock downs public transport would carry on running more or less as normal. Gets a lot of cars off the roads though.
 

Quote

And most people do not switch off their heating then they leave the house.  Actually switching it off might not be a good thing.


Here I have underfloor heating, and although I could switch it off there's no timer and it's meant to be left on. But don't most people have a timer?. Certainly that's how it was in the UK: heating would come on in the morning and evening assuming I'd be out all day. If not and it got too cold I'd press the override button.

 

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And if you stay at home you might skip one or two showers.


I've used the washing machine a lot less in the whole Corona adventure because I'll wear the same clothes for longer than if I'd been going to the office every day. And if it's just underwear you can wash them in the sink. Maybe I shouldn't admit this.

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everyone in Germany with gas or electric heating has it on a timer. This is old tech you might not even realize that is built into gas water heaters. On at wake up, off at time to go to the office, back on in the evening... Naturally this has changed with covid somewhat (at least we reprogrammed), but if you are at home, you are saving the energy it takes to commute. Our ~30 system even has a party button (stay up late) and a vacation setting (x days away = no heat/hot water).

 

If you don't have a timer on your heating, you definitely need to rethink your system. People can forget to turn off the lights/heat.

 

And to the naysayers, of course it makes a difference, even if small. And if it is common practice, more people do it. And why do you want to heat/spend money for something you are not using? Is it too hard to turn down the heat/turn off a light? Heating systems are designed to cycle, so on/off it not really an issue.

 

And as a taxpayer, I see no need to light up a public library/office if it is closed.

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I was reading that when the cap expires in the UK next year the price p.a. could shoot up to almost 7000 Quid a year and inflation go up to double digits.

 

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37 minutes ago, slammer said:

I was reading that when the cap expires in the UK next year the price p.a. could shoot up to almost 7000 Quid a year and inflation go up to double digits.

 

Didn't they already announce >10% inflation?

 

 

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