Habeck claims anyone could quite easily use 10% less energy

111 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, klingklang77 said:

 

I actually tried a raw food recipe yesterday and I was impressed (I posted on the cooking thread). But if you get more involved in it, then you will want to get a dehydrator and the ingredients can be annoying to find. In Germany, I already make enough trips to different grocery stores. I don’t need to make more. But I have a few simple dishes that I will start using. 

 

I have a sous vide stick, but I am not sure how much energy that uses. 

 

 

Here,

 

▷ Sous-Vide-Stick Test & Vergleich 2022 | Netzvergleich (netzvergleiche.de)

 

Looks in the lower middle for consumption, I have never seen this before

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

We do sous vide on our induction stove. Got rid of my crock pot for slow cooking, too. 

 

That wonderbag thing looks nuts. What happens when you drip food all over it? Too fiddly for me.


That wonderbag does look interesting. I still have my crock pot, though. 
 

I use the sous vide for meat from Lidl. It makes it taste great! Going to also use it for asparagus this spring. 
 

How do you use your Sous vide on your induction stove? I just heat up the water and use it for that. 

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13 minutes ago, klingklang77 said:

 

 

Never seen sous vide? It works a treat for me. Can get steak, fish, pork from Lidl and save a ton by cooking sous vide. Makes the meat taste amazing! 

 

 

But as FF says why can you not just use the cooker hot plate for that, or use an oven set to a certain temperature ?, Ok boil the water first to speed up the process. 

 

Maybe I will try the oven version on day 

 

Thanks I learned something today

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25 minutes ago, klingklang77 said:


That wonderbag does look interesting. I still have my crock pot, though. 
 

I use the sous vide for meat from Lidl. It makes it taste great! Going to also use it for asparagus this spring. 
 

How do you use your Sous vide on your induction stove? I just heat up the water and use it for that. 

 

First, the induction stove is energy saving. You can cook with it low enough for sous vide and for like a crock pot. Himself has one of those bag sealer things and he puts the meat in one, seals it and drops it in the sous vide for a few hours. We don't eat Lidl or Aldi meat so don't know how well that would turn out. So sous vide and then throw on the grill for a couple of minutes. My stepson does T-bones, duck breast, etc.

 

A normal stove/hotplate/ceramic stove will not cook low enough for sous vide or slow cooking for hours. A gas cooker won't either.

 

The other brilliant thing with induction is that you can boil a pot of water in just a couple of minutes. We wish we would have gotten one years ago. In between, Himself bought a single one to try out at home and on the boat. He was convinced. I made him disconnect the little peep peep function because it would wake me up in the morning when he boiled eggs or such. We still enjoy the one on the boat instead of using gas when we have land power.

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40 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

First, the induction stove is energy saving. You can cook with it low enough for sous vide and for like a crock pot. Himself has one of those bag sealer things and he puts the meat in one, seals it and drops it in the sous vide for a few hours. We don't eat Lidl or Aldi meat so don't know how well that would turn out. So sous vide and then throw on the grill for a couple of minutes. My stepson does T-bones, duck breast, etc.

 

A normal stove/hotplate/ceramic stove will not cook low enough for sous vide or slow cooking for hours. A gas cooker won't either.

 

The other brilliant thing with induction is that you can boil a pot of water in just a couple of minutes. We wish we would have gotten one years ago. In between, Himself bought a single one to try out at home and on the boat. He was convinced. I made him disconnect the little peep peep function because it would wake me up in the morning when he boiled eggs or such. We still enjoy the one on the boat instead of using gas when we have land power.

 

 

I have induction and I use it to bring the water up to the sous vide temp and then turn the induction off and let sous vide stick do its thing. This is when I use a induction stove pot (metal) for the water bath. I also have a water tub (plastic), which obviously cannot be used on an induction stove. 

 

Depending on what I am making, I will then give the meat a nice sear with a cast iron pan on my induction after achieving the proper temp. I’ll do a steak at 134-5/2 hours for a ribeye (Fahrenheit).

 

I also use the sous vide for ice cream to get the perfect custard (at 160) or dulce de Leche (180). No sear needed for either, obviously. 

 

I think my question is more do you turn off the induction when you get to the right temp with a sous vide stick? I see no point in keeping the induction going with a sous vide stick once it’s up to temp. 

 

Definitely try Lidl meat with a sous vide and nice sear. I have been very happy as some meat, especially beef, is a hit and miss with German beef. 

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1 hour ago, yesterday said:

 

 

But as FF says why can you not just use the cooker hot plate for that, or use an oven set to a certain temperature ?, Ok boil the water first to speed up the process. 

 

Maybe I will try the oven version on day 

 

Thanks I learned something today

 

The sous vide stick brings the meat to the proper temp. Check out the sous vide everything YouTube channel. If you do decide to get a sous vide stick, remember the water will cause Kalk on it. I add a bit vinegar to it to prevent it. You can reuse the water since the meat is in a plastic bag. 

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3 hours ago, fraufruit said:

That wonderbag thing looks nuts. What happens when you drip food all over it? Too fiddly for me.

 

I would take the pot out of the bag before serving. Otherwise, it looks simple enough to use - open bag, put hot pot in, close bag? 

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7 hours ago, kiplette said:

This bag  Upgecycelter Schongarer | Kochen mit dem Wonderbag (kochen-mit-wonderbag.de) may be interesting to some people.

 

There are instructions to DIY on youtube etc. if cash is an issue, but the wonderbag firm has a charitable side -  A catalyst for social change — wonderbagworld.com  - or make one and donate, which I might do.

 

Anyway, It saves about 70% of the energy for cooking, suitable for soup, stews, yoghurt etc.

 

 

 

Ha , eastern europeans have been doing this since forever - bring pot of kasha stew to a boil, cover it in a duvet, and leave it for a couple of hours. On the flip side, leave your food out on the balcony in the winter - free refridgeration!

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Wonderbag is basically slow cooking. Use a product called 'Instant Pot' for this, which is a pressure cooker amongst other things. You can find it on amazon. They have offers every now and then. Once food is heated to a certain temperature in a sealed container it doesn't need much additional heat to just maintain the temperature, especially if the heat can not easily escape. Instant pot IMHO is great for soups, casseroles etc. I am sure there are other similar products, but this was the original, so I thought I'd try it.

 

Same principle if you put a lid on a pan or not. Just see how much quicker water boils when the lid is present, and how little energy it takes to simmer. Remove the lid and the kitchen is soon full of moisture and I can guarantee you need to turn up the heat.

 

So there are things you can do, but really a national program of insulating older houses is needed. Its the cheapest option. The UK used to have a scheme where this was done at zero or next to zero cost. So insulating the loft, pumping foam into external walls, draft proofing. The reasonably cheap and effective measures for UK houses. Even included new windows as many older houses had just single glazing. For those on benefits, zero cost. For other people, hugely subsidized. Generates lots of 'installer' jobs and helps make old houses much warmer, meaning less draw on the gas/electrical heating system.

 

Why is this not proposed in Germany as the number one action?

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On 16.4.2022 22:34:39, wien4ever said:

 

Ha , eastern europeans have been doing this since forever - bring pot of kasha stew to a boil, cover it in a duvet, and leave it for a couple of hours. On the flip side, leave your food out on the balcony in the winter - free refridgeration!

Lots of foods that are kept in the refrigerated cabinets at the food shops do not need to be kept cold: yoghurt, rice pudding, Schmand.

 

People may like to enjoy beverages cold, but there is no need to put a dozen bottles of orange juice or beer in the fridge for weeks.

 

Air-conditioning must be one of the biggest wasters of energy. But it is responsible for lots of jobs😣

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On 16/04/2022, 22:34:39, wien4ever said:

On the flip side, leave your food out on the balcony in the winter - free refridgeration!

 

I always wonder that. You use energy to heat your kitchen in the winter and in the kitchen you have your fridge which is using energy to keep the contents cold. If someone had thought ahead kitchens could have been fitted with a "cold pipe" that lead outside and the fridge would just exchange heat with that. Simple.

 

Does it use more energy to keep bottles in the fridge for weeks? Probably not. 

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On 16.4.2022, 20:40:01, fraufruit said:

The other brilliant thing with induction is that you can boil a pot of water in just a couple of minutes. We wish we would have gotten one years ago. In between, Himself bought a single one to try out at home and on the boat. He was convinced. I made him disconnect the little peep peep function because it would wake me up in the morning when he boiled eggs or such. We still enjoy the one on the boat instead of using gas when we have land power.

Bought my first 20 years ago! On a quest, even back then, to get rid of all gas-stuff. My backdoor neighbor had a gas leak and subsequent explosion which almost killed him.

 

 

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12 hours ago, scook17 said:

Wonderbag is basically slow cooking. Use a product called 'Instant Pot' for this, which is a pressure cooker amongst other things

 

Yes. Indeed.

 

We are all about saving energy on this thread, to the point of not using the main light bulb in a room, hence the Wonderbag suggestion which uses no power at all, after the initial heat to boil. Like the duvet and the haybox. These other appliances, whilst certainly being cheaper than running a whole oven, are still consuming electricity.

 

10 hours ago, Dembo said:

Does it use more energy to keep bottles in the fridge for weeks? Probably not. 

 

 I think so, because the fridge is freed up for other stuff, and I think that unlike a freezer, filling a fridge does consume more energy than having it only part filled. 

Presumably you mean, once they're cold, does it take much power to keep them cold, and I guess, like you said, the answer is not much.

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12 hours ago, kiplette said:

I think so, because the fridge is freed up for other stuff, and I think that unlike a freezer, filling a fridge does consume more energy than having it only part filled. 

Presumably you mean, once they're cold, does it take much power to keep them cold, and I guess, like you said, the answer is not much.

 

If you put a lot of warm things that are denser than air into the fridge then it obviously has to work harder to cool them down. But if you open the door to an empty fridge you let all the cold air out (let's say all), whereas a fridge that's jammed packed full doesn't have as much air that can escape You might be better off keeping your fridge as full as possible, as long as you leave things in there for weeks and not constantly replace them with warm things. 

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17 minutes ago, Dembo said:

leave things in there for weeks and not constantly replace them with warm things. 

 

I agree that the frig is more efficient when full but you have to replace what you use with warm things. Of course, in winter, you can cool things down outside first.

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Once a fridge reaches steady-state, meaning all its contents have reached the desired temperature, the additional energy to keep it cool is dependent on how well the fridge is insulated. The contents no longer play a role.

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6 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I agree that the frig is more efficient when full but you have to replace what you use with warm things. Of course, in winter, you can cool things down outside first.

 

I often get Indian food delivered and buy beer from them as well, which is delivered cold. So I recommend an Indian takeaway as a way of saving energy.

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9 hours ago, Dembo said:

 

If you put a lot of warm things that are denser than air into the fridge then it obviously has to work harder to cool them down. But if you open the door to an empty fridge you let all the cold air out (let's say all), whereas a fridge that's jammed packed full doesn't have as much air that can escape You might be better off keeping your fridge as full as possible, as long as you leave things in there for weeks and not constantly replace them with warm things. 

 

Actually saw a report on the TV once, about saving money - apparently, by filling the fridge, you do save money by not losing so much cold air when you open the door, as Dembo said.

The solution shown was to put clothing in there that wasn´t really dirty, but needed to be freshened up a bit - it filled the spaces, and the cold air helped neutralise smells in the clothing.

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