Habeck claims anyone could quite easily use 10% less energy

111 posts in this topic

US gov site suggests that 6-8  degrees Fahrenheit reduction in your heating thermostat (for 8hrs a day) would be a 10% saving.

 

thermostat

 

Maybe Habeck is suggesting thicker sweaters and so saving 10% that way?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

US gov site suggests that 6-8  degrees Fahrenheit reduction in your heating thermostat (for 8hrs a day) would be a 10% saving.

 

thermostat

 

Maybe Habeck is suggesting thicker sweaters and so saving 10% that way?

 

Exactly what Jimmy Carter recommended in 1977 and we had programmable thermostats. 

 

Then came the Republicans.

 

here

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing new...

Habeck is right. Just need people to leave their comfort zone and turn off unused lights, turn down the heating, reduce the hot water temp (might need a plumber for that).

 

Saving (as does charity) begins at home.

 

Oil crisis / coal crisis in UK in the 70's had a slogan 'save it' ... and it works

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've already done all that - light only in rooms being used, heat the house only in the daytime (to a certain point), almost never use A/C, no A/C in bath or bedrooms - and now I'm not cooking or baking from 4 to 9 PM, as the rates have been raised. What's left to do? Swear to God, if they could tax breathing, they'd do it in a heartbeat!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been saving energy as well. Haven't had the heating on for several weeks. I have a lovely warm blanket to cover myself when sitting on the couch. Use of lamps reduced and so on. A few weeks ago, when it was really cold in the evenings I went to bed really early and watched TV from there on my laptop nice and warm.

 

I was born 2 years after the end of WWII and remember during my childhood that noone had central heating or warm water boilers. We spent the winter months in the large kitchen and remember us all sitting around the fireplace. Our school in Wales had no central heating, only large fireplaces, which didn't really heat the classrooms up adequately. We survived. Even though it's not comfortable, it's possible to get by on less energy, though I'm really looking forward to the warmer months to come. 

 

A few weeks ago I had a conversation with my neighbour across the hall and he said his wife has the heating on top notch all the time because she feels cold all the time and during the night the bedroom has to be at least 21 degrees Celsius. At first I thought he was having me on, but he was dead serious. 

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, bramble said:

I've been saving energy as well. Haven't had the heating on for several weeks. I have a lovely warm blanket to cover myself when sitting on the couch. Use of lamps reduced and so on. A few weeks ago, when it was really cold in the evenings I went to bed really early and watched TV from there on my laptop nice and warm.

 

I was born 2 years after the end of WWII and remember during my childhood that noone had central heating or warm water boilers. We spent the winter months in the large kitchen and remember us all sitting around the fireplace. Our school in Wales had no central heating, only large fireplaces, which didn't really heat the classrooms up adequately. We survived. Even though it's not comfortable, it's possible to get by on less energy, though I'm really looking forward to the warmer months to come. 

 

A few weeks ago I had a conversation with my neighbour across the hall and he said his wife has the heating on top notch all the time because she feels cold all the time and during the night the bedroom has to be at least 21 degrees Celsius. At first I thought he was having me on, but he was dead serious. 

 

Same here, I turned my heating off a few weeks ago.  I grew up in Ireland in the 60s/70s, also with no central heating and a lot of strikes when the power went off for days at a time. If we were cold, we were told to put another jumper on.  My Mother was great for knitting and crocheting, and to this day, I still have some of her blankets which I throw over my legs when I get cold - there's nothing like the heat that comes from real wool.

 

I have some cooking and baking to do over the weekend and I've already made a mental note of what I need to prepare earlier, so I can cook them all in the oven at around the same time, to save turning the oven on more than once. 

 

I think the older of us here have some experience, but the younger generations have never had to think about this, so this is going to be new for them and could take a little more time for them to get used to the idea of saving energy.

 

 

 

 

7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Tap said:

I think the older of us here have some experience, but the younger generations have never had to think about this, so this is going to be new for them and could take a little more time for them to get used to the idea of saving energy.

Well as it's the older generation that fucked up the planet for the younger generation I think the younger generation knows more about energy saving and what excess energy use leads to than we do.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started when the first lockdown came in 2020, knowing being home all the time would increase usage. The war has me honing every savings possibility...

 

The parental adage in the 60/70s:  "Cold? Put on another jumper." ;) 

 

Edit:

Duh!

The reason I posted in the first place was to say I have reduced utility costs by over 30%.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, robinson100 said:

the government hasn´t asked the population in general to make an effort to use less power. The savings would be amazing!

 

I suppose that's what the Habeck thing which started the thread is. Surprised it took this long, but how amazing if most people really did it, as you say.

 

I think he's probably right, that 10% would be pretty easy.

 

28 minutes ago, Janx Spirit said:

I have reduced utility costs by over 30%.

 

That's brilliant.

 

Any tips, Enlightened One?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 

I suppose that's what the Habeck thing which started the thread is. Surprised it took this long, but how amazing if most people really did it, as you say.

 

I think he's probably right, that 10% would be pretty easy.

 

 

That's brilliant.

 

Any tips, Enlightened One?

 

Just common sense really. I looked at what was eating up the most energy - hot water and heating. I love a hot bath and used to have one every other day in addition to showering. Cut bathing to once a week and shortened the duration of my showers.

 

With heating, I turned down the thermostats of all the rooms not in use, plus bedroom and kitchen, to the snowflake symbol setting. Livingroom set to 18/19° and the bathroom only on as needed.

 

Next I tackled electricity. Like others have said, turning lights off (and not using the main light in the living room, just one standing lamp). Turning computers, TVs, tablets off when not in use. Regular freezer defrosting. Smart oven/dishwasher/washing machine use.

 

(actually, I did it by tapping into the neighbours mains ;) )

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Janx Spirit said:

(actually, I did it by tapping into the neighbours mains ;) )

 

30% would have been really disappointing :lol:

 

That's a great list - hopefully people will add their thoughts and we'll all be saving like mad. 

-defrosting the freezer is my take-home from your list - I usually wait until I can't shut it, so that's an improvement I can make.

 

Thank you! 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several years ago, I decided to buy this type of Thermomotor 

 

eqiva CC-RT-N / 132231 N Heizkörperthermostat elektronisch 5 bis 29.5 °C kaufen (conrad.de)

 

It works well, once you know how to program it

 

Experts say, you are but better to turn off, your heating while you are out, than leave it on a minimum while your out, to save power, but if you go outside for a random time then it could be difficult to come back to a warm home, which I like.

 

So was thinking ( for years now ), of up grading to something like this 

 

Eurotronic 700200 Comet Wifi Funk-Heizkörperthermostat elektronisch kaufen (conrad.de)

 

With this one you can be outside, 10 minutes before you get home, you can switch the heating on to a certain temperature over  the Internet from your mobile phone, which seems perfect. Or have it on a timer, but of course you can buy things like this from many sources.

 

Sure I remember playing monopoly,  with only candle light and blankets and jumpers while the miners/power station workers were on strike in the early 1970's, ok I was not so old then, but strangely I look back on it some found memories

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will add one little tiny thing that I do. I only used cold water for rinsing off dishes, cleaning, etc. You all probably do this but I was using hot water for a long time for dishes, mopping the floor, etc. I thought it made things cleaner.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no 0 option on my floor heating, but I very rarely turn it on. I am on the middle floor and downstairs uses a fireplace, and upstairs always have their heat on, so it’s always just warm in my apartment, being that it is on 1. Too warm actually. The landlord’s job is heating and they live downstairs, so they set it up nicely, I guess. They won’t usually give Nebenkostenabrechnungen unless asked, though. 

 

I don’t use lights much and keep track of my kWh per month. I do use a dryer a few times a month, though. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This bag  Upgecycelter Schongarer | Kochen mit dem Wonderbag (kochen-mit-wonderbag.de) may be interesting to some people.

 

There are instructions to DIY on youtube etc. if cash is an issue, but the wonderbag firm has a charitable side -  A catalyst for social change — wonderbagworld.com  - or make one and donate, which I might do.

 

Anyway, It saves about 70% of the energy for cooking, suitable for soup, stews, yoghurt etc.

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fietsrad said:

Rohkost, a raw food diet, has been popular in Germany, might be worth trying.

 

I actually tried a raw food recipe yesterday and I was impressed (I posted on the cooking thread). But if you get more involved in it, then you will want to get a dehydrator and the ingredients can be annoying to find. In Germany, I already make enough trips to different grocery stores. I don’t need to make more. But I have a few simple dishes that I will start using. 

 

I have a sous vide stick, but I am not sure how much energy that uses. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do sous vide on our induction stove. Got rid of my crock pot for slow cooking, too. 

 

That wonderbag thing looks nuts. What happens when you drip food all over it? Too fiddly for me.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now