Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

English Language: "Warming Down"

21 posts in this topic

If any mod feels this is not an appropriate post for this forum please delete and accept my apologies.

 

I remember from my youth that we called the period of gentle exercise after strenuous exercise or training "warm down" and called the action "warming down".  Commonsense suggests that "cool down" and "cooling down" would have been more accurate.  

 

I still use "warm down" and "warming down", but I seem to be in a minority of one.  Does anyone on here remember using "warm down" and "warming down"?

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't ever remember this usage, but wikipedia seems to have it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooling_down.

Quote

Cooling down (also known as limbering down or warming down) is an easy exercise, done after a more intense activity, to allow the body to gradually transition to a resting or near-resting state. 

 

The Cambridge dictionary has it too.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/warm-down

Quote

warm down

 phrasal verb with warm verb [ I or T ]

to do some gentle exercises and stretches after you have done some intense physical activity, in order to allow your body to recover:

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are in a minority of two!  

 

I would always use warm down/warming down as Pappnase quoted. Maybe we are old, or it's that pesky Brits v Yanks language barrier again :) 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Warming up' would be what an American would do to get ready for an athletic event.

But afterwards we would 'cool down' which makes perfect sense to any American and probably very little to anyone else.

But as far as opposites go, warm up and cool down go well together.

And Americans would look at you funny if you say you need to 'warm down'.

Language has no reason to make sense.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, mako1 said:

'But afterwards we would 'cool down' which makes perfect sense to any American and probably very little to anyone else.

Why would you think that?:blink:

 

I've heard people say "warm down" before. I always wonder if these things get into English from German via the number of German settlers in the US. Sure enough according to dict.cc "cooldown" = "Abwärmen",which you could literally translate as warm down. But maybe that's nonsense and people are just saying "warm down" to be funny. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an American, I've never heard of warm down, so I agree with mako1, except I have no idea if it makes sense to people from other countries besides the U.S. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Also never heard it before.

I've used it and heard it many times in the past.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never heard if it before today (UK citizen here).  Sounds very odd.

 

I've heard of "warm up" & "cool down".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on context I (brit) guess. I do warm down (lips/chops) at the end of a long session of brass/alphorn activity. Muscles appreciate it the next time you pick up the instrument.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You wouldn't use it in the AC context, just in the muscular activity context, whether sport, music or whatever.

 

Like French bean, I have both heard and used it often. Warm up before, warm down afterwards. Or cool down, no problem with that and it works for AC as well, so for language learners definitely a better option.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, kiplette said:

You wouldn't use it in the AC context, just in the muscular activity context, whether sport, music or whatever.

 

What if I had been riding my Peloton beforehand? :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think people have started to use 'warm down' after outside training or sport in the winter / cold weather. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to do lots of dance/exercise classes in London back in the "Fame!" days of shiny leotards. (I remember one quite well-known journalist in a class getting teased unmercifully by the teacher calling her "Brillo" because of her silver Lurex one-piece.)

We definitely warmed down before getting back into our turquoise velour tracksuits.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used and heard both 'warm down' and 'cool down' in the states. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I don't have a Peloton. :)

 

It did seem a tad out of character :lol:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0