A gastroscopy without the sedative?

46 posts in this topic

Thank you everyone for sharing your experiences. At first I am not sure if I am the one being unreasonable insisting on the sedative(because that’s how the doctor acted, as if I am being very unreasonable), now I know I made the right choice.

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22 minutes ago, catjones said:

Pertinent, I just had an endoscopic exam last week (in the US).  Went from the curtained dressing room into the exam room on a gurney, rolled over onto the exam table on my side.  I blinked and was back on the gurney in the dressing room.  As best as I can tell, I lost ~30 minutes of my life.  Waited for a few minutes for my mandatory return home escort ride to come back and fetch me and went on with my day as usual.  Zero side effects.

Your doctor is either a quack or incompetent or both.  Since your primary care physician must have prescribed the procedure, go back to him/her and demand a gastro that gives a general anesthesia.


I am not sure if it’s a culture difference thing? Maybe Germans believe suffering is also a way of healing? (I think I heard of this saying somewhere)

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20 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

As catjones says- go back to your family MD and explain your concerns.

 

 Thank u both for the advice. Unfortunately I have just moved to this town recently and this doctor is my family MD now. Of course I am considering to go to another practice.

 

 I came to this doctor with a Überweisungsschein. He took it and refused to give it back to me. I have to find a another doctor in another town and start this process all over again. A bit frustrated. With my poor German skill it is not that easy for me.

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8 minutes ago, InfiniteJest said:

I am not sure if it’s a culture difference thing? Maybe Germans believe suffering is also a way of healing? (I think I heard of this saying somewhere)

On the contrary, I can think of several medical examples where Germans are lightweights.  IMO your doctor is simply a 🥜.  

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1 minute ago, InfiniteJest said:

 Thank u both for the advice. Unfortunately I have just moved to this town recently and this doctor is my family MD now. Of course I am considering to go to another practice.

 

 I came to this doctor with a Überweisungsschein. He took it and refused to give it back to me. I have to find a another doctor in another town and start this process all over again. A bit frustrated. With my poor German skill it is not that easy for me.

Why would you need an Überweisungsscbein?

The reason he refuses might have to do with that he may have to supervise you until you fully regained consciousness which may come with organisational problems, not with the cost of the actual drug. When I had my wisdom teeth pulled my dentist called in an anesthetist because he wasn't comfortable sedating me himself (I had to pay extra for that service). Maybe it's the same with your doc.

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I still think there is a misunderstanding.   A calming sedative is different from full anaesthesia.  That would be expensive, needs additional staff.  OP talked of wanting to be "asleep" during procedure.   However, never disregard the callousness of (some) surgeons and dentists. 

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13 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

I still think there is a misunderstanding.   A calming sedative is different from full anaesthesia.

The thing is that it's difficult to predict in an individual patient for how long those calming sedatives will take to wane, i.e. for how long you'll have to supervise them after the procedure. The short acting stuff like e.g. propofol is something a gastroeneterologist may rather have administered by an anesthetist.

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How far are you from Dortmund? Would a little train ride not be worth it to get better care?

 

If it's a problem, you would be excused from work to attend a doctor's appointment.

 

I'm sorry that you have so few options. 

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45 minutes ago, jeba said:

The thing is that it's difficult to predict in an individual patient for how long those calming sedatives will take to wane, i.e. for how long you'll have to supervise them after the procedure. The short acting stuff like e.g. propofol is something a gastroeneterologist may rather have administered by an anesthetist.

 

I had one many years ago with the sedative. I remembered nothing about it not even talking to the doctor afterwards. After a friend had taken me home late afternoon I feel asleep on the sofa and woke up sometime around midday. I recommend it if you want a good long nap.

 

The second time I was older and asked not to have the sedative. I wouldn't say it was fun, but it wasn't so bad. I've done the other end several times now without sedatives, which in the UK was always a bit of a battle. They'd always want you to have it, and then demand to know who was picking you up. So it was always a fight to say "look I'm fine. I don't want the sedative and I can walk home in 5 minutes".

 

I'm surprised they don't want to give you the option.

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33 minutes ago, Dembo said:

 

I had one many years ago with the sedative. I remembered nothing about it not even talking to the doctor afterwards. After a friend had taken me home late afternoon I feel asleep on the sofa and woke up sometime around midday. I recommend it if you want a good long nap.

That's exactly what I meant. If you don't fully wake up before lunchtime or end of the shift of the staff the doc will have a costly problem, e.g. having to pay overtime for someone to stay around. And the insurance won't cover that cost.

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Gastroscopy? I always thought it was the one where they went up your arse while singing "ring of fire"

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30 minutes ago, jeba said:

If you don't fully wake up before lunchtime or end of the shift of the staff the doc will have a costly problem, e.g. having to pay overtime for someone to stay around.

 

Are you referring to the twilight sleep they put you in for a coloscopy? Everyone wakes up 10 minutes later. If you don't wake up, they should send you to hospital.

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3 hours ago, InfiniteJest said:


I asked my doctor if this will happen, he said it’s very rare. But I don’t believe him at all.<_<

 

That's what I had, gagging the whole time to the point I had tears flowing out of my eyes and you have that tube in your throat and can do nothing but wait for it to be over.  I don't remember any after effects though.  Maybe a sore throat same day. 

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3 hours ago, InfiniteJest said:


I am very confused. And the receptionist told me that they have done this procedures with sedatives but the doctor is just not willing to do it for me. Maybe because I am not a child nor serious sick?

 

Some doctors are just assholes.  One of my friends cut his finger and the doctor just started to stitch it up without numbing.  When he complained, the doctor said he shouldn't be crying as he's a man.  :blink:

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I have had this.  I know that numbing things can be tricky, beyond just a surface spray.  I once had a nasty wound on my finger.  They covered it up and said to come a week later.  It was black and stinky.  They injected loads of anaesthetic into my finger.  That hurt a lot!  My hand blew up like a baloon.  And still hurt.   So I said, could they perhaps just try stripping away the dead flesh without any more attempts at pain relief.  It worked.  I mean, it was probably slower for the docs, but at least they knew they were only removing the dead stuff.  I am a wimp by the way.  Really. 

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The anesthesiologist was the first person I met.  She had 2-3 pages of very detailed questions about every aspect of my medical life and answered all the questions I had calmly and clearly.  She said the general anesthesia she would administer has changed over the years and there is now less chance of grogginess or nausea.  She said, "you won't feel a thing and we give you an exact amount of drug for you and your procedure".  You cannot drive or operate any machinery for the remainder of the day.  You cannot use a taxi or uber (there have been instances of being "taken advantage of" in the past).  They want you home safely with someone you know.  There are also liability issues.

Don't try to "save money" or "man up" or "do what you're told".  Some of the stories here are hair-raising.

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8 minutes ago, catjones said:

The anesthesiologist was the first person I met.  She had 2-3 pages of very detailed questions about every aspect of my medical life and answered all the questions I had calmly and clearly.  She said the general anesthesia she would administer has changed over the years and there is now less chance of grogginess or nausea.  She said, "you won't feel a thing and we give you an exact amount of drug for you and your procedure".  You cannot drive or operate any machinery for the remainder of the day.  You cannot use a taxi or uber (there have been instances of being "taken advantage of" in the past).  They want you home safely with someone you know.  There are also liability issues.

Don't try to "save money" or "man up" or "do what you're told".  Some of the stories here are hair-raising.

 

Didn't you say you had yours in the U.S.?

 

I've found that medical care/procedures are never the same here. Usually better, BTW.

 

I've only met with the anesthesiologist when I had surgeries that needed general anesthesia, not twilight sleep for coloscopies, upper GI's etc. 

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

 

Are you referring to the twilight sleep they put you in for a coloscopy? Everyone wakes up 10 minutes later. If you don't wake up, they should send you to hospital.

Not sure what you mean by twilight sleep. I was talking about those "calming sedatives" mentioned above (usually benzodiazepines) to which different people react differently. Having to send you to hospital is probably one of the costly risks her doc wants to avoid (and it would probably not be necessary anyway).

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5 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

On the contrary, I can think of several medical examples where Germans are lightweights.  IMO your doctor is simply a 🥜.  


Maybe you are right, unfortunately I can do nothing about it

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4 hours ago, jeba said:

Why would you need an Überweisungsscbein?

The reason he refuses might have to do with that he may have to supervise you until you fully regained consciousness which may come with organisational problems, not with the cost of the actual drug. When I had my wisdom teeth pulled my dentist called in an anesthetist because he wasn't comfortable sedating me himself (I had to pay extra for that service). Maybe it's the same with your doc.


The Überweisungsschein is written by my previous family doctor, introducing me to a specialist to do the gastroscopy. I think it’s necessary before you do the procedure?

 

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