Brits coming to Germany for work in a post-Brexit world

9 posts in this topic

My gaffer recently expressed concern that the two excavations we have are seriously under-staffed and that if I knew anyone with skills and availability could I mention it. Well I mentioned in one my Facebook page and expected replies from German colleagues. Replies I got, but also from an unexpected quarter - back home in the UK. I would have thought that everyone was working on the HS2 project but no, some people are not for various reasons. 

"So Taff, what do I have to do to get over there digging". Well that threw me a bit: of course previously it was not an issue but here we are. The projects will likely last until March. Would my pal need a solid offer from my firm before applying for a Visa; how does this work?

Thanks in advance,

Taff  

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7 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Employee or freelance?

Previously the gaffer was keen to have everyone on contracts but given the gravity of the situation he'd probably accept freelancers. 

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Employee would actually be better and solve the health insurance issue.

 

1 hour ago, Dark History Tours said:

My gaffer recently expressed concern that the two excavations we have are seriously under-staffed and that if I knew anyone with skills and availability could I mention it.

 

Does this mean that you are asking about a skilled British citizen who'll not be paid less than his German counterparts? 

 

Does this person have degree/ diploma?  (I'm not familiar with the work that you actually do, I only know the administrative side of applying for permits)

 

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The person is highly skilled in their field, they are a professionally qualified individual.

 

The way archaeology works in the UK is that we often have rolling contracts - month to month is common - and getting laid off over the Christmas period is sadly all too common. Winter excavations are difficult, particularly where the ground is frozen through, and so many employers let all but their core staff go in this period, with the aim of rehiring when the weather picks up. So its not like the interested parties have been fired for misconduct or anything detrimental like that. We call it "resting", which is trying to put a gloss on a crappy state of affairs. So some colleagues will be "resting" until the weather starts to pick up back home. But here, due to the pickle my firm finds itself in, the plan is to really pack in as much as we can before the snow gets too bad.

 

As for pay grades: it depends on which job(s) you are actually doing on site.

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British citizens have the option either applying in the UK before they move for a D Visum with which they can start working on arrival or come to Germany and apply here. The downside of applying in Germany is that the applicant needs to wait until the permit is processed to start working. 

 

6 hours ago, Dark History Tours said:

The person is highly skilled in their field, they are a professionally qualified individual.

 

To be considered a Fachkraft a foreigner needs either a degree or qualifications equivalent to a German apprenticeship. 

 

6 hours ago, Dark History Tours said:

The way archaeology works in the UK is that we often have rolling contracts - month to month is common - and getting laid off over the Christmas period is sadly all too common. Winter excavations are difficult, particularly where the ground is frozen through, and so many employers let all but their core staff go in this period, with the aim of rehiring when the weather picks up. So its not like the interested parties have been fired for misconduct or anything detrimental like that. We call it "resting", which is trying to put a gloss on a crappy state of affairs. So some colleagues will be "resting" until the weather starts to pick up back home.

 

I really hope your German employer is not trying that in Germany.<_<

 

6 hours ago, Dark History Tours said:

But here, due to the pickle my firm finds itself in, the plan is to really pack in as much as we can before the snow gets too bad.

 

Are they offering a standard German temporary contract?

 

6 hours ago, Dark History Tours said:

As for pay grades: it depends on which job(s) you are actually doing on site.

 

German authorities are supposed to ensure that the foreign workers are not earning less than the locals. 

 

If you prepare all the documents well, it should be possible to obtain a permit relatively quickly. When does the job start and does it include accommodation? 

 

 

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On 20/11/2021, 22:04:13, engelchen said:

British citizens have the option either applying in the UK before they move for a D Visum with which they can start working on arrival or come to Germany and apply here. The downside of applying in Germany is that the applicant needs to wait until the permit is processed to start working. 

 

 

To be considered a Fachkraft a foreigner needs either a degree or qualifications equivalent to a German apprenticeship. 

These days a BA is standard for any digging on commercial sites. I do know a few peeps who got digging on YTS schemes back in the 80's but they are not in the frame here.

On 20/11/2021, 22:04:13, engelchen said:

 

 

I really hope your German employer is not trying that in Germany.<_<

No, at the moment all the crew are on permanent contracts: my first time since I moved here.

On 20/11/2021, 22:04:13, engelchen said:

 

 

Are they offering a standard German temporary contract?

Don't know - but we are in sh*t-street so the gaffer will probably do whatever needs to be done in this regard.

 

 

German authorities are supposed to ensure that the foreign workers are not earning less than the locals. 

I mean that I, like in most jobs, there is a hierarchy, a chain of command, different job grades: our anthropologist will be on a different grade to me

 

If you prepare all the documents well, it should be possible to obtain a permit relatively quickly. When does the job start and does it include accommodation? 

The job is open now. My co-workers tell me that the boss really dropped the ball on this one, knowing months ago that we had two big jobs coming up and yet for whatever reasons, was not proactive in recruiting. No accommodation included - it was never considered that there might be interest from the UK (and Morocco would you believe, via LinkedIn ), and so it was assumed that there would be no need to organise a place to crash, that people would be working from home. I've never actually been put up for work, even though its so common in the UK that it is taken as standard.

 

On 20/11/2021, 22:04:13, engelchen said:

 

 

 

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'our anthropologist'

 

A phrase I never thought I'd read on here!

Yay for anthropologists! 

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