Staff shortage in KITA, problem everywhere ?

10 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I just received a letter from the (public) Kita that due to staff shortage and staff illness, groups would be closed and children would be required to stay at home.

It was explained this was due to the hiring rules, subsidies, unability to find more staff, etc. And there was no solution. We need to live with it.

 

How much of this scenario is familiar to you when teachers get sick at kindergarten?

Do you stay at home with your kids or you pick them early ? 

 

What about in the elementary school, when there is only one teacher ?

 

Thanks for the answers !

Luis

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oh boy - that situation was the nightmare of my "raising a child while working full time" years. Many years (decades, really) before COVID-19 made the situation a little more bearable with home office and greater flexibility in the schedule, I had to always be prepared with a "plan B" at very short notice for the first 6 years of my child's life.

 

Talk to your employer. Maybe you can work different hours, while the other parent watches the child? Use any and all available vacation days, use your accumulated overtime, find a new KiTa asap, have a reliable babysitter on hand, find a "rent-a-granny" service. You may also be able to pool your efforts with other affected parents in your area, watching each others' kids if need be. 

 

Lucky for you, the problems become less stressful when the child enters elementary school. There, if a teacher is sick, they can't send kids home - that is the beautiful law of "Schulpflicht". Which means your child may not be learning much about reading/writing/math - but at least they will be tended to in school while you do whatever you planned to do.

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38 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

Lucky for you, the problems become less stressful when the child enters elementary school. There, if a teacher is sick, they can't send kids home - that is the beautiful law of "Schulpflicht". Which means your child may not be learning much about reading/writing/math - but at least they will be tended to in school while you do whatever you planned to do.

 

They send the kids home in NRW - our Grundschule had a staffing crisis last winter and one of the classes had to stay home for eight days because there just wasn't enough teachers to go around. I'm open to correction but I don't think there is a temp teacher system here - unlike in the UK or Ireland for example.

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2 hours ago, LuisFG said:

It was explained this was due to the hiring rules, subsidies, unability to find more staff, etc. And there was no solution. We need to live with it.

 

There is a massive shortage of trained teachers at all levels. 

 

2 hours ago, LuisFG said:

What about in the elementary school, when there is only one teacher ?

 

In Berlin the kids usually don't have class when the teacher is out sick and there doesn't seem to be a system in place to monitor them. Some go home, some hang out with friends, others do who knows what. 

 

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12 minutes ago, pmd said:

I'm open to correction but I don't think there is a temp teacher system here

 

There is in Berlin, and according to my 9th-grade son, the substitutes here are not as universally awful as the ones I had growing up in Northern California.

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34 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

 

 my 9th-grade son,

 

 

NO WAY. Just last year he was counting the stops, wasn't he? :)

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30 minutes ago, tor said:

 

NO WAY. Just last year he was counting the stops, wasn't he? :)

We made the step-counting video in 2011. Crazy, huh?

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4 hours ago, pmd said:

. I'm open to correction but I don't think there is a temp teacher system here - unlike in the UK or Ireland for example.

 

My wife is a primary school principal, a Beamtin, and therefore a paid-up member of a mafia-like organisation.

The horror stories I could tell...if I weren't afraid of her being identified and being sent to one kind of camp or another.

Her budget allows her to get a temp in, when, for example, a teacher is sick, for up to a maximum of 70 hours (combined) per YEAR. Cool, eh? The other problem with that is, there really aren't any teachers available, they're already working somewhat else or retired and can't be f...d anymore.

Yes, one of the reasons we came back here is because the education system is far superior...my arse.

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4 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

 

There is in Berlin, and according to my 9th-grade son, the substitutes here are not as universally awful as the ones I had growing up in Northern California.

 

Are there currently enough substitute teachers for all public schools or just the elite ones? I've heard of many younger kids who had classes cancelled (all pre-pandemic) and were just left to their own devices. 

 

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Niedersachsen - Grundschule - ours was one that kept the kids regardless of circumstances -   verlässliche was the word that thankfully another parent asked the meaning of at parent's evening one time.  

 

We know of Gymnasium teachers who have apparently been forced into Grundschulen.

 

Friends in NRW were horrified when their 7 y o was left in the playground for 2 hours when her class fällt aus and they were not informed. New to Germany, they were a bit surprised, to say the least. Presumably not a Verlässliche Grundschule :)

 

OP, I fear your current situation is not going to change any time soon. Round here, the Red Cross/Paritätische organises an Oma/Opa 'adoption' scheme - I suppose if it all works out brilliantly, through such a scheme one might end up with an adult who will take up some of the slack, but I fear it is a bit of an outside chance.

 

 

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